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Saeco MC2002 Burr - John K.'s Review
Posted: July 11, 2002, 8:54am
review rating: 6.8
feedback: (0) comments | read | write
Saeco MC2002 Burr
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Arrow The Saeco MC2002 Burr has 22 Reviews
Arrow The Saeco MC2002 Burr has been rated 6.65 overall by our member reviewers
Arrow This product has been in our review database since November 30, 2001.
Arrow Saeco MC2002 Burr reviews have been viewed 86,015 times (updated hourly).

Quality Reviews
These are some of the best-written reviews for this product, as judged by our members.
Name Ranking
Tony Reynolds 8.50
Doug Wiebe 8.20
Brendan Getchel 7.66
Paul Quinn 7.50
Leigh Booker 7.40

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Ratings and Stats Overall Rating: 3.8
Manufacturer: Saeco Quality: 3
Average Price: $120.00 Usability: 3
Price Paid: $110.00 Cost vs. Value 3
Where Bought: comforthouse.com Aesthetics 7
Owned for: 1 year Overall 3
Writer's Expertise: Advanced Would Buy Again: No
Similar Items Owned:
Bottom Line: Not to be used to produce an espresso grind!  Very inconsistent results.
Positive Product Points

Looks nice, but that won't get you a good espresso grind.  It MIGHT make a decent regular coffee grind, but I can't see how it can be consistent in that regard either given it's shortcomings.

Negative Product Points

NOT made for espresso grinding!  Too many negatives to list concisely.  Inconsistent results due to design flaws that constantly vary the grind at a static setting.

Detailed Commentary

Beware-NOT made for espresso grind!  I've had this unit for more than a year and after trying all things possible, I cannot make this thing produce a consistent grind for espresso without continous cleaning of the grind chute.  To begin with, as all other reviewers seem to attest, it's a MESS to operate with all the static electricity built into the plastic gcomponents.  It spews grinds while grinding if you don't hold the lid down, and then makes up for it the second you open the lid by dispersing grinds everywhere in the vicinity.  For espresso, the setting has to be near the lowest number or the grinds aren't fine enough for espresso.  Thus, there's not much adjustability in the espresso range.  Next, it has a goofy thick plastic "screen" over the grind-chute.  I can only suppose it's supposed to stop whole beans from shooting thru at the higher grind settings or to keep geniuses from sticking their fingers up the chute while it's grinding.  In either case, it only serves to clog up and hold back the grinds from falling easily into the cup; especially when trying for a finer grind for espresso.  I immediately cut this piece out in an effort to stop the persistent clogging.  This helped, but the rough-cast metal surface of the grind chute coupled with all of the static electricity still builds up grinds quickly in the chute to cause clogging and grinding variability.  The variability comes from grinds sticking in the chute and causing new grinds to drop out slower.  As the buildup increases, grinds can't escape the grinding component fast enough and you end up with too fine a grind and an impervious espresso puck.  Thus, you have to constantly monitor this situation and be of keen eye to know what the grind is supposed to look like in order to try to obtain consistent espresso results.  NOT what I was looking for!

The unit fits nice on the counter and looks good, but that doesn't make a good espresso.  I would definitely encourage you to look elsewhere if you want to make espresso grinds with this unit.  Based on other reviews, it seems to do OK with regular coffee grinds, but I can't see how that is consistently possible if the grinds have the same buildup problem in the chute.  Unless the grind setting is very coarse, I can't see how the chute wouldn't clog and alter the dispense rate and thus alter the grind.

As a footnote, I tend not to believe novice consumer reviews as you may fall prey to opinions that are not well versed in the art of espresso equipment.  Any good review(er) of a grinder should make the distinction of their primary use, i.e. drip coffee vs. espresso.  If they're espousing the virtues of a machine for it's coarser grind capability, that review will not apply equally to it's espresso grind capabilities. Good luck.

Buying Experience

I bought this online at comforthouse.com becuase they had the lowest price at the time.

Three Month Followup

This is actually a one-year follow-up comment.  After almost exactly two years, this grinder has died.  Due to the mess it makes, I won't be looking to waste my time repairing it.  I'll be looking longingly at the Mazzer-Mini

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review rating: 6.8
Posted: July 11, 2002, 8:54am
feedback: (0) comments | read | write
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