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oomph
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oomph
Joined: 14 Sep 2005
Posts: 104
Location: Hobart

Espresso: LM's.Slayer, Synesso
Grinder: Mazzers conical only.
Roaster: Joper.
Posted Tue Nov 13, 2007, 3:10am
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

hey fenners,

good luck on your new venture.. I see you are from Echuca, great spot.

there has been a few reactions to your post and I suggest you contact us privately should you like to know more.

we have had much experience roasting in difficult situations and would be happy to talk further.

our email is coffee@oomphcoffee.com

cheers,

Nikki
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caffeinediva
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caffeinediva
Joined: 10 Aug 2007
Posts: 66
Location: Melbourne
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: Wega Mini Nova EVD
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Roaster: Brambati 120Kg
Posted Sun Nov 18, 2007, 9:59pm
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

In reply to the comment made by Nettuno on this subject

MOST COMMERCIAL ROASTERS DID NOT START OFF IN A BACKYARD SHED


Thanks for reading
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jasonscheltus
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jasonscheltus
Joined: 9 Oct 2003
Posts: 116
Location: Melbourne
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Posted Mon Nov 19, 2007, 6:32pm
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

caffeinediva:
You made me laugh for a long time, thanks.

but, say you did want to become a commercial roaster... what seems to be the most common or successful route? Cafe, smaller roaster, big roaster? Or, financial backer, roaster, cafe, big roaster? What do you think?

-jason
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MarcS
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Joined: 30 May 2006
Posts: 66
Location: Sydney
Expertise: Professional

Posted Mon Nov 19, 2007, 6:46pm
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

caffeinediva Said:

MOST COMMERCIAL ROASTERS DID NOT START OFF IN A BACKYARD SHED

Posted November 18, 2007 link

And who says they can't? Gotta start somewhere! I know I've started this way. While not a big commercial, I'm working towards it. Sometimes, the most successful people are the ones who do things outside the box.
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CraigA
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CraigA
Joined: 19 Dec 2001
Posts: 11,176
Location: Rexdale, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
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Posted Mon Nov 19, 2007, 6:50pm
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

MarcS Said:

And who says they can't? Gotta start somewhere! I know I've started this way. While not a big commercial, I'm working towards it. Sometimes, the most successful people are the ones who do things outside the box. Sometimes, the most successful people are the ones who do things outside the box.

Posted November 19, 2007 link

& starting/working with a shoestring budget too!

 
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brentling
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brentling
Joined: 25 Sep 2002
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Posted Mon Nov 19, 2007, 6:50pm
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

I guess it depends quite on your definition of backyard :)

CraigA Said:

& starting/working with a shoestring budget too!

Posted November 19, 2007 link

I dream of a shoestring budget
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caffeinediva
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caffeinediva
Joined: 10 Aug 2007
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Location: Melbourne
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Posted Mon Nov 19, 2007, 7:28pm
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

CraigA Said:

& starting/working with a shoestring budget too!

Posted November 19, 2007 link

I agree everyone has to start somewhere, but please before making a quote I would hope people would do their research and really find out how a commercial roaster started and what blood sweat and tears go into the first few years of getting established.  

I am forming the opinion that everyone thinks they can just be a roaster, set up any kind of operation and off they go.  

A word of advice, anyboady can roast, even I can do that, but the real art is the blending and being able to cup and taste  And yes there is a leaning towards single oprigin coffee's today, but a true Italian style espresso needs to be a BLEND, and that not everyone can do.

So keep up the enthusiasm and if anyone wants some info or an opinion on commercial roasting please feel free to drop me an email

Caffeine Diva
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Nettuno
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Nettuno
Joined: 19 Nov 2005
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Posted Mon Nov 19, 2007, 8:40pm
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

Within my involvement with coffee roasters and coffee in general
I have seen a fair few start ups and listened to stories of start ups from those that have played a part of what people call speciality coffee in New Zealand and Australia; I can say there have been a few sheds involved. The one I liked the most was a little coffee shop that my grandmother use to visit in takapuna that is now a monster roaster consuming speciality coffee roasters for more market share, the start up owners are long gone but the name remains the same.
If you wonder why I have a lot of respect for fire this is a couple of experiences
First roast
Not to sure about roasting but have spent a fair bit of time with roasters and  roasting process, machine not really running right very slow mechanically good ,drum gate moves back and forward .now getting ready light the machine up thing hits 130 that’s as hot as it gets ok  time for a roast, after a while it all starts to move along nice and quite slow ok 1st   now she’s smoking nice sea side town good breeze not to many people around ,2nd out you go, where’s all that smoke coming from?thats right don’t forget to close the drum gate when checking that the drum moves back and forward, a couple of wet tee towels and the bean fire is out! now that did get the blood pumping.
New bearings
Helping a friend set up a small vintage 3.5kg shop roaster 1940s English new bearings and belts on machine .burner on drum shaft coffee is tossed around flame .
Friend’s grandfather set up gas and gas lines new o rings etc
Machine works vintage motors and belts all do as they should ok light it up
Bit of a problem to light hindsight says over gassing, ok where is the paper?
Lights newspaper holds to burner var boom nice big fire ball and very spooked roaster
With no eyebrows .
Joshua      
lots of research on this topic over a fair few coffees in many different roasting plants and sheds .
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Luca
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Luca
Joined: 27 Jan 2004
Posts: 2,658
Location: Melbourne, Australia

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Posted Tue Nov 20, 2007, 2:09am
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

I have met a fair few commercial roasters now, and I think that we probably have people who started in three main ways:

1) Training with the big boys and then spun off to do their own thing.  Surprising how many people who run great roasteries now started off at places that ... well ... you wouldn't really buy any coffee from.

2) Getting a good grounding in business, building up their palates, possibly whilst running a cafe, then deciding to make the big leap into roasting.  These dudes make a plan and save up.

3) People who just shove a roaster in their shed.

In general, I think that it's not unfair to say that category one and two roasters are more likely to produce a great roast than category three.  Which is not to say that there aren't great category three roasters - several certainly did well at golden bean recently.  On the other hand, opportunists really do irritate me.  True opportunists take advantage of what all any other purveyor of crap coffee does - the fact that for many customers an assertion that your coffee is good is the same thing as it actually being good.  I find this absolutely reprehensible as a consumer because I think that this attitude is at least partly responsible for the fact that I don't feel that I can read anyone's blend description and actually have a good idea of what it is going to taste like.  Who is going to write something realistic when that means risking losing sales to the scumbag down the street who is selling floor sweepings with a description oozing buzzwords?

To me, the big difference between the roasters in these different categories is how they have developed their coffee knowledge, including their palates.  Those in the first category will often had the benefit not only of tasting a lot of different coffee, but of tasting blends across a whole cycle of changing crops.  Those in the second category will have at the very least developed a good palate - they might not have a gut reaction in advance that a particular crop is a hot pick, but they know a good sample when they get it.  Those in the third category might well be in the same boat.  But they are the ones with the least invested in the idea of starting a commercial roastery and, consequently, from the consumer's perspective, they are the most likely to be opportunistic - either intentionally, or because they simply don't realise what they are buying, roasting and blending.  And with the Internet, everything is even less transparent than in the real world.  I have nothing but respect for people who home-roast well and nothing but support to people who home roast badly and are making an effort to learn, but I would feel duped if I bought beans that someone had bought on someone else's recommendation and roasted with a heat gun.

Meanwhile, I think that the established roasters need to take note of the new generation of micro-roasters.  Some of them are doing truly fantastic work.  But from the consumer's point of view, it's impossible to tell without tasting the coffee.  I would love to see the ACCC start cracking down on unrealistic blend descriptions as "misleading and deceptive conduct" under the trade practices act.

So to any prospective roasters out there, get tasting!

Cheers,

Luca

 
General ramblings about coffee: http://www.pourquality.blogspot.com/

Reviews of Australian coffee: http://www.coffeereviewaustralia.com/
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caffeinediva
Senior Member
caffeinediva
Joined: 10 Aug 2007
Posts: 66
Location: Melbourne
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: Wega Mini Nova EVD
Grinder: Mazzer Mini Electronic
Roaster: Brambati 120Kg
Posted Tue Nov 20, 2007, 4:15am
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

jasonscheltus Said:

caffeinediva:
You made me laugh for a long time, thanks.

but, say you did want to become a commercial roaster... what seems to be the most common or successful route? Cafe, smaller roaster, big roaster? Or, financial backer, roaster, cafe, big roaster? What do you think?

-jason

Posted November 19, 2007 link

jason

Luca pretty much sums it up in his comment, my father started roasting in Victoria for a now very large sydney based roaster and then branched out on his own in 1970 not in a shed either.  

As it has been said on here we all need to start somehwere and rightly so, but I would hope that the coffee world will keep the art true and not ride on internet knowledge instead of actually learning the craft before calling themself a roaster.

People think I have a big mouth and am opinionated and should probably keep my opinions to myself, unfortunately being an italian woman I cannot

Eleonora
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