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Roasting in a residential area
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Discussions > Regional > Australasia > Roasting in a...  
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fenners
Senior Member


Joined: 25 Oct 2007
Posts: 4
Location: Echuca
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: VBM Domo Super
Grinder: Macap M4, Isomac, DIP
Vac Pot: Hario
Roaster: YUCEL 10kg
Posted Thu Oct 25, 2007, 11:41pm
Subject: Roasting in a residential area
 

Hi Guys,
I'm about to start roasting from a shed in my backyard with a 10kg roaster.
It's a residential area and it is prohibited by council.
I was going to start roasting and plead ignorance if the council ever knocked on my door - but I'm starting to feel uneasy about this and will probably apply for a permit or rent a shed in an industrial location.
I'd like to know how many roasters started out by ignoring council warnings and ran a roaster from the backyard.
Were you caught out?
I'd also like to hear from those that have proceeded to get council approval - what was required?
And finally how many roast on a 10kg or less roaster with an Afterburner?

Cheers!
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alanfrew
Senior Member
alanfrew
Joined: 19 Dec 2001
Posts: 645
Location: Melbourne
Expertise: Professional

Posted Fri Oct 26, 2007, 2:03am
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

fenners Said:

Hi Guys,
I'm about to start roasting from a shed in my backyard with a 10kg roaster.
It's a residential area and it is prohibited by council.
I was going to start roasting and plead ignorance if the council ever knocked on my door - but I'm starting to feel uneasy about this and will probably apply for a permit or rent a shed in an industrial location.
I'd like to know how many roasters started out by ignoring council warnings and ran a roaster from the backyard.
Were you caught out?
I'd also like to hear from those that have proceeded to get council approval - what was required?
And finally how many roast on a 10kg or less roaster with an Afterburner?

Cheers!

Posted October 25, 2007 link

Cripes, talk about asking for trouble! Unless you have a proper stack (forget antipollution and greenhouse gas requirements) you will be putting out nice little airborne incendiary particles into an area which is so dry it could catch fire with a burning gaze. Smaller roasters can do well with an electrostatic precipitator/scrubber rather than an afterburner.

Alan
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jasonscheltus
Senior Member
jasonscheltus
Joined: 9 Oct 2003
Posts: 116
Location: Melbourne
Expertise: Professional

Posted Fri Oct 26, 2007, 12:18pm
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

yeah, what could possibly go wrong?
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danaS
Senior Member
danaS
Joined: 17 Apr 2006
Posts: 39
Location: New Zealand
Expertise: Pro Barista

Espresso: FAEMA Duo, Home E61
Posted Fri Oct 26, 2007, 4:34pm
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

101 warning bells going off!  Murphy's Law says something will go terribly wrong...don't do it!
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fenners
Senior Member


Joined: 25 Oct 2007
Posts: 4
Location: Echuca
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: VBM Domo Super
Grinder: Macap M4, Isomac, DIP
Vac Pot: Hario
Roaster: YUCEL 10kg
Posted Fri Oct 26, 2007, 6:54pm
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

A wise man once said it is always better to ask than to make assumptions.

I think I need to clear a few things up.
I understand that environmental issues provoke strong debate but please understand that I haven't yet started this venture (and it's not yet a commercial venture) - I want to hear from others with similar experience and factual advice.

SO, has anyone actually tried this or am I the first person to give it a go? Has anyone had the same idea and thought better of it?

I have asked this question because I don't want to upset the neighbours and don't want to create a bad reputation. I don't really want to know what people think about the idea, just have you tried it - yes - great tell me about your experience. Or no - ok move on to the next post, no comment required thank you.

Firstly, I'm not stupid. I don't want to kill my children, my wife, my neighbours or myself from roasting - I'm trying to learn about the emissions, their effect on the environment and how they compare to other generally accepted emissions eg log fires. Any help on this learning curve would be appreciated. I also don't want to burn my house down. Duh!

I am trying to improve the quality of coffee in my area, but it's going to be a slow process. You can't change people overnight and consequently I don't see the value in outlaying thousands for an industrial setup from day one.
At this stage it is all a hobby for me.
I intend to start slow and small - I won't be roasting 24/7 - I will practice my craft and hopefully sell a few bags along the way as I build up my reputation.
My knowledge and experience gained thus far from speaking with people in the roasting industry tells me that initially my roasting won't cause too much nuisance however, I do intend to be successful so at some point in the future my roasting time will increase and with that will come an increase in pollution. I am trying to get more of an idea from other's experience, say experience, of when that time might come so I can make an informed decision on:
A) Go ahead and give it a go, then get permits if I consider it a viable commercial venture
B) Get permits
C) Get an afterburner then A or B
D) Install some sort of commercial rangehood-style device that would provide a suitable pollutant filter then A or B

Hopefully that all makes sense and gets things back on the right track
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triclops
Senior Member
triclops
Joined: 20 Mar 2003
Posts: 112
Location: Melbourne
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: w:synesso cyncra
Grinder: w:Mazza robur 3phase
Vac Pot: clover
Roaster: renegade 5 kg, vintage 22k...
Posted Sat Oct 27, 2007, 1:52am
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

I'm a big believer in going in good and proper...

Start half arsed stay half arsed.. thats just my thoughts..

You are talking about not really committing.. I agree with Alan and others..

It needs to be done properly both from a safety/health/care and mental..

Go for a area thats suited, roast on anything bigger than a 12k and get an emission control device, are you going to do this or just poke at it..

If you are going to go belly up do it good and proper dude..

cheers Mark
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caffeinediva
Senior Member
caffeinediva
Joined: 10 Aug 2007
Posts: 66
Location: Melbourne
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: Wega Mini Nova EVD
Grinder: Mazzer Mini Electronic
Roaster: Brambati 120Kg
Posted Sat Oct 27, 2007, 2:28am
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

You Know I cant believe what I have just read, wow man,

After having just got back from visiting places like the Mazzer and Wega/Cma factories, the Milan Host  trade show, here I read you want to set up a totall illegal facility,

ALL I CAN SAY IS  "DUDE GET REAL"  COFFEE ROASTING IS AN ART.

BUT IF YOU WANT THE REPUTATION AS SOME BACKYARD ROASTER HEY ALL THE POWER TO YOU, HAVE FUN

Caffeine Diva
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fenners
Senior Member


Joined: 25 Oct 2007
Posts: 4
Location: Echuca
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: VBM Domo Super
Grinder: Macap M4, Isomac, DIP
Vac Pot: Hario
Roaster: YUCEL 10kg
Posted Sat Oct 27, 2007, 4:57am
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

caffeinediva Said:

You Know I cant believe what I have just read, wow man,

After having just got back from visiting places like the Mazzer and Wega/Cma factories, the Milan Host  trade show, here I read you want to set up a totall illegal facility,

ALL I CAN SAY IS  "DUDE GET REAL"  COFFEE ROASTING IS AN ART.

BUT IF YOU WANT THE REPUTATION AS SOME BACKYARD ROASTER HEY ALL THE POWER TO YOU, HAVE FUN

Caffeine Diva

Posted October 27, 2007 link


Sorry you've read wrong - I don't WANT to setup an illegal facility, I thought I made that clear in my second post. Nor did I intend to create such a controversial post. Remember there is no regulatory authority on this - I've had some industry people tell me one thing and the general consensus on this post is quite obvious.
I still don't know if I can roast in a residential area with an afterburner - but rest assured I will be contacting my local council on Monday and going through all the steps to gain a permit.
Thanks for all the responses, I wait in hope that someone can recount a story of going from backyard roaster to commercial success.
To try one last time...nah I won't!! I've learnt quite a bit from this post.

By the way, what has the fact that you've just visited Mazzer, Wega et al got to do with the crux of my post.
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nunu
Senior Member


Joined: 17 Jan 2006
Posts: 42
Location: Carlingford, NSW, Australia
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: San Marino CKX
Grinder: Mazzer Mini, Gino Rossi RR45
Roaster: Popper x2, heat gun,...
Posted Sat Oct 27, 2007, 6:54am
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

The crux is you can't take no for an answer.

You obviously didn't get the replies you liked in another forum, so decided to try your luck here.  How many people need to tell you no before you get the idea?

You're better off selling ice cream.  At least you won't smoke up the place.
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Nettuno
Senior Member
Nettuno
Joined: 19 Nov 2005
Posts: 13
Location: melbourme
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Faema, la san marco, etc
Grinder: mazzer,etc
Roaster: drum
Posted Sat Oct 27, 2007, 6:13pm
Subject: Re: Roasting in a residential area
 

Most commercial roasters started this way.

Do you have a good relationship with the people that you will affect?

Is your machine safe?

Jetted for the bottle?

Some form flame gas shut off Protection?

Yucel in my experience need to be sorted before firing!

Run your flue into a 44 gal drum cap then enlarge flue as a very basic cyclone for chaff collection as when learning to control your machine chaff fire is a very high risk!

Have a fire plan as just about any thing will go wrong just when you lest expect it
If running a single motor machine with no mods your cooling times will be slow at best avoid the dark side as your cooling air flow will not handle the energy, heat...

Talk to the fire/crews make your self known as they will turn up if you are roasting.

Understand your machine donít leave anything to chance pull the thing to bits play with the air flow make notes seal all union points for fire if machine is over gassed
And if there are deposits of chaff in system more chance of fire.

Roasting times will be around 30 mins for a standard pre 2000 machine.
Are you sure itís a ten kg what is the drum size? How many holes what diameter?

Electrically is it sound.
Bearings greased, no power no spin round Ėwarp drum fire etc

Just for fun get out the wok and pan roast some green till the point of fire and feel the energy then stop movement, Smokey fun .what are you going to do when your machine stops with ten kgs of fun?run?.

Spent some time on the set up give good access to all parts remove all rubbish and roast with a friend.

Be prepared for fire as it will happen!
Echua has an industrial area have a look around their may be something a lot more useable I understand the fact that you need to learn to roast before hitting the street
And on that point yucel will be a hard lady to tame.  

Your machine will need to be complied with class b gas appliance tag if installed on mains.
Talking about and planning will help
If you are thinking a long the lines of sound commercial venture etc there will be pain
 
Good luck Joshua
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