Our Valued Sponsor
OpinionsConsumer ReviewsGuides and How TosCoffeeGeek ReviewsResourcesForums
Espresso: Questions and Answers
Italian Style SIngle Shot Espresso
Rancilio Silvia - How to
Step by step guide for easy brewing and steaming with the Rancilio Silvia
www.seattlecoffeegear.com
 
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered  
Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Discussions > Espresso > Q and A > Italian Style...  
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
showing page 2 of 3 first page | last page previous page | next page
Author Messages
vberch
Senior Member


Joined: 26 Mar 2010
Posts: 176
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Faema Lambro, Faema Faemina,...
Grinder: Mazzer SJ, Pharos, Lido,...
Roaster: 1-lb US Roaster, Behmor
Posted Tue May 15, 2012, 12:04pm
Subject: Re: Italian Style SIngle Shot Espresso
 

Or just pull ristretto. Use your existing double basket, tighten the grind (or increase the dose if you don't want to adjust your grind setting) and pull a ristretto.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
motleyfirecrue
Senior Member


Joined: 27 Jan 2008
Posts: 13
Location: Australia
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Silvia Rancilio + Auber PID
Grinder: Mazzer Mini
Posted Wed May 16, 2012, 4:12am
Subject: Re: Italian Style SIngle Shot Espresso
 

NobbyR i think you're onto something with the process of making a single and i'll keep playing with it and let you know the results. If that fails i'll give the LM basket a go too.

Next problem will be finding a robusta blend locally!!

Thanks again
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
motleyfirecrue
Senior Member


Joined: 27 Jan 2008
Posts: 13
Location: Australia
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Silvia Rancilio + Auber PID
Grinder: Mazzer Mini
Posted Wed May 16, 2012, 5:04am
Subject: Re: Italian Style SIngle Shot Espresso
 

vberch I have tried to make ristretto's before but always taste foul. Any more how to details would be much appreciated.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
NobbyR
Senior Member
NobbyR
Joined: 10 Jul 2011
Posts: 2,050
Location: Germany
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Poccino Opus One, Ariete
Grinder: Eureka Mignon Istantaneo
Vac Pot: N/A
Drip: Melitta Linea Unica de Luxe
Roaster: N/A
Posted Thu May 17, 2012, 1:20am
Subject: Re: Italian Style SIngle Shot Espresso
 

motleyfirecrue Said:

vberch I have tried to make ristretto's before but always taste foul. Any more how to details would be much appreciated.

Posted May 16, 2012 link

A ristretto is literally a restricted caffè, i.e. a concentrated, very strong espresso. It is brewed with the same dose and extraction time as a regular espresso but with less water: 15 ml for a single and 30 ml for a double shot. This is achieved by grinding finer.

 
***
"This drink of the Satan is so delicious that it would be a shame to leave it to the infidels." (Pope Clement VIII on coffee, when he was urged to ban the beverage)
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
lifeandpeace
Senior Member
lifeandpeace
Joined: 9 Nov 2007
Posts: 745
Location: PBI

Espresso: Arrarex Caravel
Grinder: BUNN G1, Zassenhaus knee
Vac Pot: Cory / Hario / Silex
Drip: cloth, glass Hario V60;...
Roaster: RK Drum, WBP II
Posted Fri May 18, 2012, 6:00am
Subject: Re: Italian Style SIngle Shot Espresso
 

motleyfirecrue Said:

So to get to the point, how do I replicate the Italian Style Ristretto with the gear that I have?

Posted May 13, 2012 link

Wella, it'sa nota witha the equipmenta you havea, buta ifa you wanta obscenea ristretto Italiano, usea Arrarex Caravel.

 
www.lampmode.com
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
motleyfirecrue
Senior Member


Joined: 27 Jan 2008
Posts: 13
Location: Australia
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Silvia Rancilio + Auber PID
Grinder: Mazzer Mini
Posted Wed May 23, 2012, 12:18am
Subject: Re: Italian Style SIngle Shot Espresso
 

Hi Life and Peace

I would love one but at this stage Silvia it will have to be.

But i think i am a way off having the skills for a lever machine anyway.

Just to confirm for those that are expert ristretto makers, all other factors are the same ie same tamp pressure etc but a finer grind?
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
NobbyR
Senior Member
NobbyR
Joined: 10 Jul 2011
Posts: 2,050
Location: Germany
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Poccino Opus One, Ariete
Grinder: Eureka Mignon Istantaneo
Vac Pot: N/A
Drip: Melitta Linea Unica de Luxe
Roaster: N/A
Posted Wed May 23, 2012, 6:46am
Subject: Re: Italian Style SIngle Shot Espresso
 

motleyfirecrue Said:

... Just to confirm for those that are expert ristretto makers, all other factors are the same ie same tamp pressure etc but a finer grind?

Posted May 23, 2012 link

Exactamundo.

 
***
"This drink of the Satan is so delicious that it would be a shame to leave it to the infidels." (Pope Clement VIII on coffee, when he was urged to ban the beverage)
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
vberch
Senior Member


Joined: 26 Mar 2010
Posts: 176
Location: Milwaukee, WI
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Faema Lambro, Faema Faemina,...
Grinder: Mazzer SJ, Pharos, Lido,...
Roaster: 1-lb US Roaster, Behmor
Posted Wed May 23, 2012, 7:03am
Subject: Re: Italian Style SIngle Shot Espresso
 

Correct, adjust the grind to produce around 15 ml of coffee. On your Mini it should be between one and two notches counter clockwise. The idea is to produce a 100% extraction ratio. What it means is that if you are using 15 gr of coffee, your shot should be around 15 gr when you are done. If you have a scale, weigh your grind in the basket and then weigh the shot. It is easier to judge the weight rather then volume because of the crema.

Here is a very detailed explanation: Click Here (www.home-barista.com)

Just weigh your empty basket, zero the scale (to subtract the weight of the basket), grind in the basket, tamp, weigh the basket with coffee, put your empty cup on the scale, zero the scale, pull the shot, weigh your coffee. It sounds complicated, but it isn't.

You don't have to do it every time (unless you want to...), just until you figure out your ratio.

Buon appetito!

motleyfirecrue Said:

Hi Life and Peace

I would love one but at this stage Silvia it will have to be.

But i think i am a way off having the skills for a lever machine anyway.

Just to confirm for those that are expert ristretto makers, all other factors are the same ie same tamp pressure etc but a finer grind?

Posted May 23, 2012 link

back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
TopoTail
Senior Member


Joined: 19 Dec 2001
Posts: 20
Location: Berkeley
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: ECM Giotto
Grinder: Mini Mazzer
Vac Pot: Nope
Drip: Melita (for camping trips)
Roaster: Haven't gone there
Posted Sat Jun 2, 2012, 1:36pm
Subject: Re: Italian Style SIngle Shot Espresso
 

I've been brewing single shots for years, using a La Marzocco single basket, and my results are pretty consistent. I don't weigh the beans. I just grind them until there is a slight hump above the rim, then tamp. What I aim for is getting the right amount of coffee in the basket so that the imprint of the screen is clearly visible after I knock the puck out of the basket. I've never measured my tamp pressure on a bathroom scale, but it's fairly firm, and I make sure the tamp is level and smooth.

(I've never forgotten an analogy someone once used to describe the importance of a smooth tamp: That the water in an espresso machine is like a lazy child who is also very smart. If there is even a tiny pit in the surface, the water will find it and get through the coffee the easy way, which will give you bitter, weak coffee.)

For me the best shots are those that begin with just a few drips, then slowly form themselves into a straight and heavy mouse tail. Taking a page from Dr. John, I watch the mouse tail and stop the shot as soon as it begins to wiggle, which means I pull very short shots. But they're strong enough to hold up just fine, thank you, in a cappuccino.

Then, of course, there's the coffee. I recently bought a couple pounds of Cafe d'Arte beans (Seattle), which I used to use but had gotten away from. If you want an "Italian" espresso that's easy to work with and produces a lot of crema, try Cafe d'Arte. They make four or five blends, all pretty dark and all, I think, including a percentage of robusta. Even the decaf produces a beautiful shot with little fuss. Of course, you're not going to get the spicy, floral flavors that are favored by most serious American roasters, but you will get a very "Italian" shot.
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
realdoctor
Senior Member


Joined: 2 May 2002
Posts: 5
Location: Hong Kong
Expertise: Advanced

Posted Sat Jun 2, 2012, 2:23pm
Subject: Re: Italian Style SIngle Shot Espresso
 

Single shots on home machines always are more challenging.  I have been a dedicated fan of single shots for a long, long time - and a good espresso still can be elusive.

The easiest approach is overdosing with a slightly more coarse grind.  This is nothing at all like what the Italian baristas do, but it will make it easier for you.  

A good point was made by an earlier poster.  An Italian bar is using a blend heavy on robusta.  That will produce more crema and a bigger flavor than most of the arabica blends used by home enthusiasts.  You might try something like a monsooned Indian coffee to get some of the same results.  Or find someone who will sell you a recently roasted robusta blend - not easy to do in the US.

I do find smaller, deeper baskets a little easier to manage with a single. I also think that it makes a difference to have a machine that produces a steady 9 bar.  It is easier to pull a single on a machine with a procon pump than it is on a home machine operating at much higher pressure.  I don't know if you have checked the pump pressure on your Rancilio, but it probably is producing much more than 9 bar at the portafilter.  Preinfusion also seems to make a bigger difference with a single.  

I realize that neither the procon nor preinfusion is going to be possible with the Silvia - but don't feel bad if it is a struggle to get a good single.  The Silvia will produce a good coffee, and it is a lot cheaper to throw away half a double than buy a new machine with a rotary pump and e61 group.

Enjoy the Silvia and play to its strengths - you are still drinking better espresso than an awful lot of people.
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
showing page 2 of 3 first page | last page previous page | next page
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Discussions > Espresso > Q and A > Italian Style...  
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered     Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
Discussions Quick Jump:
Symbols: New Posts= New Posts since your last visit      No New Posts= No New Posts since last visit     Go to most recent post= Newest post
Forum Rules:
No profanity, illegal acts or personal attacks will be tolerated in these discussion boards.
No commercial posting of any nature will be tolerated; only private sales by private individuals, in the "Buy and Sell" forum.
No SEO style postings will be tolerated. SEO related posts will result in immediate ban from CoffeeGeek.
No cross posting allowed - do not post your topic to more than one forum, nor repost a topic to the same forum.
Who Can Read The Forum? Anyone can read posts in these discussion boards.
Who Can Post New Topics? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post new topics.
Who Can Post Replies? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post replies.
Can Photos be posted? Anyone can post photos in their new topics or replies.
Who can change or delete posts? Any CoffeeGeek member can edit their own posts. Only moderators can delete posts.
Probationary Period: If you are a new signup for CoffeeGeek, you cannot promote, endorse, criticise or otherwise post an unsolicited endorsement for any company, product or service in your first five postings.
Donate to Coffee Kids
Coffee Kids works with farming communities around the world, improving lives. Donate today.
www.coffeekids.org
Home | Opinions | Consumer Reviews | Guides & How Tos | CoffeeGeek Reviews | Resources | Forums | Contact Us
CoffeeGeek.com, CoffeeGeek, and Coffee Geek, along with all associated content & images are copyright ©2000-2014 by Mark Prince, all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Content, code, and images may not be reused without permission. Usage of this website signifies agreement with our Terms and Conditions. (0.320198059082)
Privacy Policy | Copyright Info | Terms and Conditions | CoffeeGeek Advertisers | RSS | Find us on Google+