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Making  a Ristretto shot
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katkoehler
Senior Member


Joined: 26 Dec 2010
Posts: 5
Location: Vancouver
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Mon Aug 15, 2011, 3:43am
Subject: Making  a Ristretto shot
 

Hi,
I can't afford an espresso machine to make my lattes and buying them is so expensive so I want to make them at home.  Normally I buy my coffee at Starbucks and get a Grande Latte with a single ristretto shot.  At home I have a Mocka Express Coffee Maker and ground coffee beans.  Is it possible to create a ristretto shot with these two things.  Thanks for any help you can provide.
katkoehler
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calblacksmith
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calblacksmith
Joined: 25 Nov 2007
Posts: 7,675
Location: Riverside, Ca, U.S.A.
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: ECM Vene. A1, La Cimbali M32
Grinder: Azkoyen Capriccio, Major
Vac Pot: 40s era Silex
Drip: Msl. Com. brewers
Roaster: gave it a try, decided no
Posted Mon Aug 15, 2011, 6:42am
Subject: Re: Making  a Ristretto shot
 

Short answer, no.

Now, that said, the Moka pot is the way nearly every person in Italy makes coffee at home. A moka pot will give you strong coffee and while you may need more than a single shot to flavor your milk, you can achieve a passable drink with what you have.

You will need to find another way to froth your milk, such as a hand held whipper and heat the milk in a sauce pan or in the microwave.

With FRESH coffee (not available at Starbucks) and a burr grinder such as the Click Here (www.baratza.com) (sometimes available referbed at their site for about $70) you will have a much better drink than you will ever get at *$.

Fresh coffee is less than 15 days from the day it WAS ROASTED ON, not a best by date.
Fresh ground coffee is no older than 15 MINUTES FROM WHEN IT WAS GROUND.

Fresh ground, fresh coffee will make a HUGE difference in your finished product.

 
In real life, my name is
Wayne P.
Anything I post is personal opinion and is only worth as much as anyone else's personal opinion. YMMV!

Feed the newbs, starve the trolls and above all enjoy what you drink!
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katkoehler
Senior Member


Joined: 26 Dec 2010
Posts: 5
Location: Vancouver
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Mon Aug 15, 2011, 7:06am
Subject: Re: Making  a Ristretto shot
 

Okay, do you have any suggestions how to make my latte less strong.  I like the ristretto shot because I find the full shot too strong and bitter.  (BTW, my father gets fresh beens which he roasts and grinds and has offered to supply me with coffee to use with my moka express.
Thanks for your thoughts.
katkoehler
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NobbyR
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NobbyR
Joined: 10 Jul 2011
Posts: 2,023
Location: Germany
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Poccino Opus One, Ariete
Grinder: Eureka Mignon Istantaneo
Vac Pot: N/A
Drip: Melitta Linea Unica de Luxe
Roaster: N/A
Posted Mon Aug 15, 2011, 8:30am
Subject: Re: Making  a Ristretto shot
 

katkoehler Said:

...I like the ristretto shot because I find the full shot too strong and bitter...

Posted August 15, 2011 link

At home it's probably more a problem of brewing technique. The water in a vac pot usually gets too hot for making espresso (apart from not being able to build up enough pressure).

 
***
"This drink of the Satan is so delicious that it would be a shame to leave it to the infidels." (Pope Clement VIII on coffee, when he was urged to ban the beverage)
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fnacer
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Joined: 25 Feb 2007
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Location: Denver
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Salvatore E61, Vivaldi Mini...
Grinder: Mazzer Mini, Gaggia MDF,...
Roaster: Behmor 1600
Posted Mon Aug 15, 2011, 2:25pm
Subject: Re: Making  a Ristretto shot
 

Have you considered a stove top steamer? There are a couple of models out there, one of which uses the same bottom half as the Moka pot. The one I used to use worked much better than any of the low-end espresso machines I've owned.
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katkoehler
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Joined: 26 Dec 2010
Posts: 5
Location: Vancouver
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Mon Aug 15, 2011, 3:48pm
Subject: Re: Making  a Ristretto shot
 

Thanks for the suggestion.  I will look into it.
katkoehler
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ZhaRnotczar
Senior Member


Joined: 22 Jul 2011
Posts: 6
Expertise: Just starting

Posted Tue Aug 16, 2011, 1:07am
Subject: Re: Making  a Ristretto shot
 

The first step you need to take is understanding what a ristretto is, compared to an espresso.  Here's the first page I pulled up on wikipedia.

"Ristretto usually just means less water; a double espresso shot is typically around 60 ml (2 fl oz), while a double ristretto is typically 45 ml (11.5 fl oz).

One modern method of "pulling" a ristretto shot is to grind the coffee finer than that used for normal espresso, and pull the shot for the same amount of time as a normal shot. The smaller spaces between the particles of finer-ground coffee allow less water to pass through, resulting in a shorter shot. However, this can also lead to a gritty taste, if the coffee is ground fine enough that the insoluble components can pass through the filter-basket. This is often a problem in poorer grinders, where the grind is not as even.

Another modern method for pulling a ristretto is to simply stop the extraction early, so less water has time to pass through the ground coffee. This produces a slightly different taste than the fine-grinding, equal-time method, and is often preferred in fast-paced cafes because it does not require the barista to change the settings on the coffee grinder."

I'm going to assume Starbucks takes the second route, and thus, I really don't think there is much difference in flavor between a Starbucks ristretto and espresso.  The main difference is in volume: how much coffee is diluting the milk.  With a ristretto, you have less coffee, so less strength.  Espresso has more coffee, so more strength.

So, if you're not too worried about spending the money on equipment to properly make a latte, I would recommend just lowering your coffee dosage.  Either use less coffee or add more milk.
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katkoehler
Senior Member


Joined: 26 Dec 2010
Posts: 5
Location: Vancouver
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Tue Aug 16, 2011, 1:59am
Subject: Re: Making  a Ristretto shot
 

Thanks for the info.  Since I am not a coffee connisseur, and all of you that are will wince at this most likely, I am adding hot water to the shot and then adding milk and it seems to do the trick.  In truth, I'm not even that keen on really foamy latte because I feel like I'm being cheated out of the amount of beverage I get so I don't really need a machine.  I have a little hand held milk frother which does the trick well in terms of milk froth.
Cheers all,
katkoehler
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