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Lameen
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Lameen
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Posted Tue Jul 29, 2008, 12:56pm
Subject: How Do you De-gas fresh coffee
 

Hi guys,

I just bought really fresh coffee - roasted a few hours before I bought it and of course the roaster said it is alright to use on a home machine - I'm not sure what he meant by that as my machine has semi-commercial parts, E61, etc. In any case, the coffee smells really fresh but of course when extracted, the "bubbles" - symbol of too fresh coffee extracted for espresso - appear and the coffee is a bit sour both for espresso and French Press.

I'm not a roaster but I have heard that when coffee is too freshly roasted it needs to "de-gas" - how do I do this ? Just leave the coffee bag open for a few days ?

Grateful for your help.

Lameen
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ValhallaCoffeeRoasters
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Posted Tue Jul 29, 2008, 1:02pm
Subject: Re: How Do you De-gas fresh coffee
 

Your coffee will degas no matter what you do, but i don't recomend leaving the bag open for too long. After 12 or so hours from roasting, the coffee has degassed enough for any extraction method you choose.

Byron
Valhalla Coffee Roasters
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JohnF
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Posted Tue Jul 29, 2008, 1:28pm
Subject: Re: How Do you De-gas fresh coffee
 

I vote for not doing anything and just waiting until Friday before pulling shots.

If you can't wait then as a back up plan I'd vote for milk drinks. :)

 
"coffee is bag to me. It always follow me like bag. I do love coffee. Its taste & aroma make me sweet~ . I happy happy day with coffee"
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Frost
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Posted Tue Jul 29, 2008, 2:37pm
Subject: Re: How Do you De-gas fresh coffee
 

For espresso the extraction will be much better if you wait 3-5 days after roast, But don't leave the bag open.
For any other brew method I think 12-24hrs after roast is enough. (though I haven't checked this in a long while)

If you can't wait..., I've heard (but never tested) that it helps to 'rest' after you grind (like 30 minutes to 8 hours...) this will release more CO2 quickly?.... I don't know about that but if I only had fresh roast I would give it a try.
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greeneye
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Posted Wed Jul 30, 2008, 4:04am
Subject: Re: How Do you De-gas fresh coffee
 

Keep your beans in a one-way valved bag, give them 2-3 days rest post-roast and they should be starting to be drinkable. Some beans reach their peak after 7-14 days depending on the variety.
Once you grind the beans they only stay fresh for a few minutes so only grind before brewing.
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BrownWater
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Posted Thu Jul 31, 2008, 4:35am
Subject: Re: How Do you De-gas fresh coffee
 

I agree with 2 or 3 days...if you wait 5 days you'll be half way to stale already.

 
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Vincent
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alsterling
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Posted Sat Aug 2, 2008, 7:56am
Subject: Re: How Do you De-gas fresh coffee
 

BrownWater Said:

I agree with 2 or 3 days...if you wait 5 days you'll be half way to stale already.

Posted July 31, 2008 link

Lameen.....while there may be more than one correct answer, there is a general consensus answer that serves as a guideline. I would also add that it's a good idea to respect the roaster's instructions. If it's their blend, they should be the most knowledgable. (although I'd love to find out why your roaster would recommend immediate use?) Also, and this sometimes happens, your roaster may have thought that you might be grinding the beans for drip brewing? Although that doesn't change the outgassing and life cycle of the roasted bean. (Maybe he felt drip brewing would be more forgiving?)

I believe that if you chat with a cross-section of coffee people who roast, store and serve their beans, you will find that the outgassing and ageing cycles vary. This becomes evident when you learn how the beans are being handled/stored from the roaster. In general, we can all agree that the guideline is that one should let beans "rest", in a container closed to atmosphere, for approximately 3 days. The "one way valve" allows pressure to equalize in the bag, without letting oxygen in. It's also said that the CO2 outgassing protects the beans during this "outgassing period." And if you're trying to share the basics of coffee with someone, explaining that the beans need to be consumed within another week, is also a general guideline. You can't go too far wrong.

However...............there are exceptions

Malabar Gold blend from Josuma Coffee Co., can reach its peak in flavor, (the opinion of many Malabar users that have reported back to the company founder, Dr. John), in as much as 10-14 days (and longer) after roast. I've been roasting this blend for nearly 3 years, and after roasting, put the beans in a screw-top tupper-type container and then in the door of the fridge. I do "single shot" grinding, and prefer not to leave the beans on the espresso counter, as I notice that it obviously accelerates the aging during warmer months. This doesn't seem to appreciably slow the outgassing, but does appear to slow the longer-term maturation of the beans and their eventual staleing. I also sometimes take out a quantity of beans and leave them on the counter in the container, always capped. They warm to the ambient temperature, and show their small amount of oily glisten. If cold, the coffee oils are solid and don't appear, and I'm sure that modifies the flavor components if ground while cool, but I serve alot of this bean and received good response regardless of how I store them.

 
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Everman
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Posted Wed Sep 3, 2008, 5:14pm
Subject: Re: How Do you De-gas fresh coffee
 

For espresso use you'll need to wait an appropriate amount of time. What is appropriate depends  on the particular beans and level of roast. Unfortunately I do not know of any rule to make it easier, you just need to experiment to find out what works. Generally beans should rest for at least 2 or 3 days, but I have heard of blends winning major competitions when the beans were roasted nearly a month ago, so it really does depend on your specific situation. The experimenting is all part of the fun :)
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Starchief
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Posted Wed Sep 10, 2008, 6:13pm
Subject: Re: How Do you De-gas fresh coffee
 

The de-gas time varies with types of beans.  I have Triomphe glass jars with the rubber seals, and after roasting, I typically leave the lid unlatched for the first hour, while the beans are cooling and resting.  Then I latch the lid and store out of direct sunlight on my counter.  The next day, I'll open the latch while holding down on the lid, then slowly ease up on the lid, allowing the pent up CO2 to vent off.  It's easy to hear the pressure vent off, and I usually vent the beans twice a day.  For some beans, they are done venting in two days (no more pressure), for others it takes three or four days.
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Jasonian
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Jasonian
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Posted Thu Sep 11, 2008, 8:31pm
Subject: Re: How Do you De-gas fresh coffee
 

As a few have already stated, I'll go ahead and echo the fact that there is no standard wait time.

12hrs. may be enough for one coffee, but not even close to making a dent in the time required for another.  

I've had to wait upwards of 10 days for a coffee to degass into its prime on several occasions.

I've also had coffees go stale on the 6th day after roasting.  

It depends on a whole slew of factors that, on the whole, aren't reliable enough indicators to make a "rule chart" for degassing times.  

That having been said, it's best to just try a shot.  If it's way too fresh, give it a couple of days.  If it's just a little too fresh, give it a day.

The flavor should tell you if it's close to being ready or not.  ("fresh bubbles" aren't a reliably clear indicator.  "prime" coffee can have them too, but fresh coffee almost always... that's right, almost, exhibits this visible feature.  )

 
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