Our Valued Sponsor
OpinionsConsumer ReviewsGuides and How TosCoffeeGeek ReviewsResourcesForums
Espresso: Espresso Machines
Delonghi Magnifica repair in DC Area
Stefano's Espresso Care
Repair - Parts - Sales
Factory Authorized &
Trained Technician
www.espressocare.com
 
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered  
Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Discussions > Espresso > Machines > Delonghi...  
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Author Messages
DCWildcat
Senior Member


Joined: 22 Oct 2012
Posts: 8
Location: Washington DC
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Mon Oct 22, 2012, 2:47pm
Subject: Delonghi Magnifica repair in DC Area
 

Hello everyone, I am new to these forums.  I have a Delonghi Magnifica ESAM 3300 that is about 6 years old now.  It recently started leaking water when I make espresso.

Last time I needed a repair, I had to ship the machine off to Charlotte NC.  Does anyone know a place in the DC area where it could be repaired this time?

Many thanks in advance!
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
qualin
Senior Member
qualin
Joined: 30 Jun 2012
Posts: 649
Location: Calgary, AB
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Izzo Alex Duetto 3
Grinder: Mazzer Mini Elect. Type A
Vac Pot: Looking to buy
Drip: Manual
Roaster: Considering?
Posted Tue Oct 23, 2012, 2:18am
Subject: Re: Delonghi Magnifica repair in DC Area
 

DCWildcat Said:

Hello everyone, I am new to these forums.  I have a Delonghi Magnifica ESAM 3300 that is about 6 years old now.  It recently started leaking water when I make espresso.

Posted October 22, 2012 link

I'm sorry to hear about your issues, but six years of lifespan out of a super-automatic is pretty good.

Now, in all honesty I can't answer your question due to where I'm located. If you want to stop reading now, I don't blame you.

I'm going to start out by saying that while some forum members do own Super-Automatics for the sake of convenience, A lot of the other members of this forum have grown to despise
super-automatic machines, not because of what they do, but rather how well (Or not) they do it and their limited longevity. Rather than considering sending out your machine for repair,
which is one of your options, perhaps you should consider "upgrading" to a semi-automatic or an automatic machine?

While I think that it is great that a super-automatic is a fantastic timesaver in that you put beans in, push a button and coffee comes out, the end result isn't as good as you think it is.
It can't ever be! I should know. I've had straight shots that came out of a super-automatic that tasted like burnt dirt. (At least IMHO.)

Considering the kind of machine I have, it takes me ten minutes, from start to finish to prepare a cappuccino or a latte for myself in the morning. The whole process wakes me up a bit
and has been fun and educational. Not to mention, I'm getting cafe quality drinks for my work. Sure, it's 9 more minutes of "inconvenience", but the end result is so much better. I get
so much more depth and flavor out of my drinks than what I was used to getting.

I've heard of people getting close to 20 years of service out of their semi-automatic machines. (With regular maintenance) Super-Automatics simply haven't proven themselves in that regard yet.
It has been my experience reading on this forum that many consumer grade Super Automatics start failing right around the 5 year mark, or earlier. They're not easy or cheap to fix, unfortunately.

If you are insistent on sticking with a Super-Automatic machine, consider replacing your Delonghi with a Quickmill Monza. They're not cheap machines, but they are designed to handle light
cafe duties and will last you many many more years than a consumer grade super-automatic.

If you are genuinely curious and want to learn more, you can get started with a very decent semi-automatic espresso machine and grinder for less than half the price of a light commercial grade Super-Auto.

I realize that this isn't the answer you are looking for, but perhaps it might get you thinking about other options.

Good luck.

 
Garbage In, Garbage Out, for every step of the process. From Beans to grinder, grounds to machine, coffee to cup.
back to top
 View Profile Contact via ICQ Contact via MSN Messenger Link to this post
NobbyR
Senior Member
NobbyR
Joined: 10 Jul 2011
Posts: 2,021
Location: Germany
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Poccino Opus One, Ariete
Grinder: Eureka Mignon Istantaneo
Vac Pot: N/A
Drip: Melitta Linea Unica de Luxe
Roaster: N/A
Posted Tue Oct 23, 2012, 2:27am
Subject: Re: Delonghi Magnifica repair in DC Area
 

You might try CoffeeTico Services, located in Montgomery County, Maryland. However, being 6-years-old your machine may have reached the limit of its lifespan, and it's more or less disposable. Sorry!

 
***
"This drink of the Satan is so delicious that it would be a shame to leave it to the infidels." (Pope Clement VIII on coffee, when he was urged to ban the beverage)
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
DCWildcat
Senior Member


Joined: 22 Oct 2012
Posts: 8
Location: Washington DC
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Tue Oct 23, 2012, 8:19am
Subject: Re: Delonghi Magnifica repair in DC Area
 

Thank you both for very helpful responses.  I sent an e-mail to coffeeTico.

I would love to use a semi-automatic espresso machine but I am a novice at making espresso.. nowhere near the level of expertise as regular members of this site.  I think you are right that my Magnifica (which I like a lot) is on its last legs, and I have a big decision to make on my next machine.  Should I keep it simple and go with another Delonghi OR try a semi-automatic.. and maybe take a class at the Counter Culture center in DC..? Tough call.

Any tips on machines would be greatly appreciated.  I cannot imagine spending more than $1000.  I will also search on other threads.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
NobbyR
Senior Member
NobbyR
Joined: 10 Jul 2011
Posts: 2,021
Location: Germany
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Poccino Opus One, Ariete
Grinder: Eureka Mignon Istantaneo
Vac Pot: N/A
Drip: Melitta Linea Unica de Luxe
Roaster: N/A
Posted Tue Oct 23, 2012, 10:16am
Subject: Re: Delonghi Magnifica repair in DC Area
 

You're welcome.

It all depends on what you want from your machine. Superautomatics are mostly about convenience and less about espresso quality. Handling a traditional semi-automatic portafilter espresso machine isn't as difficult as it may seem. With little practice you'll be able to pull better shots than your DeLonghi ever made. But keep in mind that you'll need a capable grinder as well, if you want to take that step.

I suggest you read this article on How to Buy an Espresso Machine.

 
***
"This drink of the Satan is so delicious that it would be a shame to leave it to the infidels." (Pope Clement VIII on coffee, when he was urged to ban the beverage)
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
Coffeenoobie
Senior Member
Coffeenoobie
Joined: 11 Dec 2011
Posts: 3,009
Location: PNW
Expertise: I like coffee

Espresso: N S Oscar
Grinder: K30 & Vario W
Posted Tue Oct 23, 2012, 11:32am
Subject: Re: Delonghi Magnifica repair in DC Area
 

A class would be good to help you make up your mind if you can do it or not.  I wish I had be able to take a class early on.  By the time I did I was too advanced for the class.  But I did learn a lot of tips for better milk steaming.  I just jumped in with both feet and no idea if I would even like good espresso about 11 months ago now.  I am not sorry I did.  I am having fun and everyone started somewhere.  You know for a fact you like espresso drinks so moving up is reasonable step to consider.  I think I am doing pretty well and having fun.  But I am a foody and like making good stuff for my family, it is an act of love for me.

 
Coffeenoobie

Buying advice: GRINDER GRINDER GRINDER. Don't cheap out on the grinder.

My coffee treasure map...
Click Here (maps.google.com)

Oscar trick out: http://s156.photobucket.com/user/GandBteam/story/14231
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
qualin
Senior Member
qualin
Joined: 30 Jun 2012
Posts: 649
Location: Calgary, AB
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Izzo Alex Duetto 3
Grinder: Mazzer Mini Elect. Type A
Vac Pot: Looking to buy
Drip: Manual
Roaster: Considering?
Posted Tue Oct 23, 2012, 11:41am
Subject: Re: Delonghi Magnifica repair in DC Area
 

DCWildcat Said:

I would love to use a semi-automatic espresso machine but I am a novice at making espresso..

Posted October 23, 2012 link

Don't let that discourage you. I've seen a video of an 8 year old making espresso with a semi-automatic. There are plenty of videos on youtube which show people doing it.
Believe me, it isn't difficult or hard. I've even made it part of my morning routine, which says something when you have a guy who is half-asleep doing it. :-)

Basically, it comes down to three things:

  1. Grinding for the right fineness into the portafilter with fresh coffee beans.
  2. Tamping. This doesn't take as much skill as you'd think.
  3. Lock and Load into machine, pull the shot.
  4. After-shot cleaning
  5. Steaming milk for lattes or cappuccinos. (This one requires a bit of skill, but is forgiving.)

If you get it wrong, you'll find out where and why fairly quickly.. as well, you have the resources of multiple forums to assist you if you get stuck or frustrated.

Don't let the knowledge dumps (Like the one I'm giving you :-) ) intimidate you. You'll pick it up quick.

DCWildcat Said:

Should I keep it simple and go with another Delonghi OR try a semi-automatic..

Posted October 23, 2012 link

Do you want to try something new and learn something neat? :-) The former choice won't let you do that. Worst case scenario? You sell your grinder and machine
on craigslist or Kijiji at a slight loss and go back to using a Super-Automatic. No harm done. Although, I doubt that once you give this a shot, you'll want to go back.

DCWildcat Said:

and maybe take a class at the Counter Culture center in DC..?

Posted October 23, 2012 link

I'm taking a barista class in December even though I've been pulling shots since June. I made a few mistakes and maybe I've developed a few bad habits. I
think that a barista class would teach me a few good, neat little tricks and act as an excellent refresher. Youtube can only teach me so much!  

DCWildcat Said:

Any tips on machines would be greatly appreciated.  I cannot imagine spending more than $1000.  I will also search on other threads.

Posted October 23, 2012 link

Let me start out by saying that your budget isn't unreasonable. $1000 gets you a decent machine and grinder. This does limit your options a little, but it doesn't
prevent you from buying equipment which I would consider to be inferior.

My advice would be, search out the specialty boutique espresso equipment shops in your area and consider buying a machine/grinder combo. They always usually have
promotions which bundle up a grinder and an espresso machine for a decent deal. Everyone is selling Rancilio Rocky / Rancilio Silvia combinations. If you can find an
alternative to the Rocky, consider that.. but only because you may end up frustrated with the stepped grind selection when grinding for espresso.

Just be prepared for a little bit of sticker shock at first, but stay firm to your budget. A good shop should be able to accommodate you.

Speaking from experience, The Rancilio Silvia is a good machine to learn on but it is a machine you have to be patient with. If you can find one used in great shape,
they are good value for the money. However, there are cheaper new Single-Boiler Dual-use machines on the market that offer better value for the money. The Silvia is
bar none one of the highest quality SBDU machines one can buy. Other SBDU options in your price range are machines like the Gaggia Classic, Lelit PL4TEM or the Ascaso Uno.

For grinders, I'd recommend either the Lelit PL53, Baratza Preciso or the Baratza Vario, depending on how much you want to go over your budget. Please note, I do not
have personal experience with any of these grinders except for the Rocky, I'm going purely by what other people on the forums have said about them.

Good luck!

 
Garbage In, Garbage Out, for every step of the process. From Beans to grinder, grounds to machine, coffee to cup.
back to top
 View Profile Contact via ICQ Contact via MSN Messenger Link to this post
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Discussions > Espresso > Machines > Delonghi...  
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered     Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
Discussions Quick Jump:
Symbols: New Posts= New Posts since your last visit      No New Posts= No New Posts since last visit     Go to most recent post= Newest post
Forum Rules:
No profanity, illegal acts or personal attacks will be tolerated in these discussion boards.
No commercial posting of any nature will be tolerated; only private sales by private individuals, in the "Buy and Sell" forum.
No SEO style postings will be tolerated. SEO related posts will result in immediate ban from CoffeeGeek.
No cross posting allowed - do not post your topic to more than one forum, nor repost a topic to the same forum.
Who Can Read The Forum? Anyone can read posts in these discussion boards.
Who Can Post New Topics? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post new topics.
Who Can Post Replies? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post replies.
Can Photos be posted? Anyone can post photos in their new topics or replies.
Who can change or delete posts? Any CoffeeGeek member can edit their own posts. Only moderators can delete posts.
Probationary Period: If you are a new signup for CoffeeGeek, you cannot promote, endorse, criticise or otherwise post an unsolicited endorsement for any company, product or service in your first five postings.
Cafe Solutions
Commercial sales and service, nationwide installation, equipment leasing options.
www.seattlecoffeegear.com
Home | Opinions | Consumer Reviews | Guides & How Tos | CoffeeGeek Reviews | Resources | Forums | Contact Us
CoffeeGeek.com, CoffeeGeek, and Coffee Geek, along with all associated content & images are copyright ©2000-2014 by Mark Prince, all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Content, code, and images may not be reused without permission. Usage of this website signifies agreement with our Terms and Conditions. (0.454940080643)
Privacy Policy | Copyright Info | Terms and Conditions | CoffeeGeek Advertisers | RSS | Find us on Google+