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getting screw out
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Discussions > Espresso > Espresso Mods > getting screw...  
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friendlyfoe
Senior Member


Joined: 14 May 2013
Posts: 122
Location: toronto
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Sat Oct 26, 2013, 10:39am
Subject: getting screw out
 

Is there a special tool for getting this out? or just a big flathead. I tried to see if i could get it with a bit too small screwdriver but the brass is as soft as brass. The shower screen screws into that for my little saeco and on top of the screen was filled with coffee grit/grinds. I would like to get that out so i can clean inside.

friendlyfoe: screen.jpg
(Click for larger image)
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D4F
Senior Member


Joined: 15 Mar 2012
Posts: 1,979
Location: USA
Expertise: I like coffee

Espresso: Gaggia Classic PID
Grinder: Baratza Forte-AP
Posted Sat Oct 26, 2013, 11:47am
Subject: Re: getting screw out
 

IIRC you inherited that, meaning that the screw may not have been out.  I think a large well fitting flat head, but you may need to heat the group, or whole piece.  The coffee residue and oils can adhere that in and may soften a bit while hot.

 
D4F also at
http://www.gaggiausersgroup.com/
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friendlyfoe
Senior Member


Joined: 14 May 2013
Posts: 122
Location: toronto
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Sat Oct 26, 2013, 12:17pm
Subject: Re: getting screw out
 

heat will be key, have a little bit of that coffee cleaning powder left that i will mix in to some boiled water and let the piece sit. I dont have any screwdrivers that big though, time to go to the store!
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D4F
Senior Member


Joined: 15 Mar 2012
Posts: 1,979
Location: USA
Expertise: I like coffee

Espresso: Gaggia Classic PID
Grinder: Baratza Forte-AP
Posted Sat Oct 26, 2013, 12:30pm
Subject: Re: getting screw out
 

Cleaner can't hurt, but I am not sure that it will penetrate as far as the oils and crud did with time.  Inexpensive fairly large flat

Click Here (www.harborfreight.com)

Have you actually been using this machine, or has it been mostly sitting?

 
D4F also at
http://www.gaggiausersgroup.com/
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friendlyfoe
Senior Member


Joined: 14 May 2013
Posts: 122
Location: toronto
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Sat Oct 26, 2013, 12:50pm
Subject: Re: getting screw out
 

been using it and what comes out of it is pretty poor. When i inherited it the screen was completely plugged, i'm not even sure where the water was getting through. Between the group and screen was caked with grounds as well. I tried running it with the screen removed and center screw back in, and it was pretty clear that water isn't coming evenly out of the group, so now i'd like to take the group apart. I find it hard to believe that the machine is capable of producing a reliable 9 bar, but i'm still curious what it's capable of running properly.

If i get the group apart without destroying it i'd be very curious to see what i could get out of it with a bottomless PF, but i dont see me dropping 80 bucks into a pf for this machine. Maybe someone has a used one they can sell me cheap! I figure if i get it running well i could at least give it to a friend once i upgrade to a real machine.
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D4F
Senior Member


Joined: 15 Mar 2012
Posts: 1,979
Location: USA
Expertise: I like coffee

Espresso: Gaggia Classic PID
Grinder: Baratza Forte-AP
Posted Sat Oct 26, 2013, 1:24pm
Subject: Re: getting screw out
 

The nice thing is that if you get it working well, it is capable of reasonable shots.  That gives you a bit of time to get in the routine and decide what you want before dropping money and deciding that you want some different.  A good "starter machine" if you get it working, and then you are not rushed.

 
D4F also at
http://www.gaggiausersgroup.com/
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friendlyfoe
Senior Member


Joined: 14 May 2013
Posts: 122
Location: toronto
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Sat Oct 26, 2013, 1:34pm
Subject: Re: getting screw out
 

The thing is with the pressurized PF i'm not convinced it's capable of delivering reasonable shots. I just cant help but wonder if the PF design is indicative of not being able to supply enough flow to reach 9 lbs? I can try to find a bottomless PF but you'd never know what sort of pressures it's reaching. Still better than nothing!
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D4F
Senior Member


Joined: 15 Mar 2012
Posts: 1,979
Location: USA
Expertise: I like coffee

Espresso: Gaggia Classic PID
Grinder: Baratza Forte-AP
Posted Sat Oct 26, 2013, 2:14pm
Subject: Re: getting screw out
 

The pump is a ULKA 41w if I read correctly.

Click Here (www.saecoparts.com)

You can also see the valve that you are trying to remove there, and non-pressurized PF's.

The pump and flow chart look like this

Click Here (www.google.com)

Most ULKA pumps in Saeco, Gaggia, and other SBDU are similar, though newer models are 52w I believe.  Still similar flow vs pressure.  As you can see 200 - 300 ml/min at 9 bar and espresso uses 30 - 50 ml of the approximate 125 ml available in 25 seconds.  If the pump works, flow and pressure should be fine.

The pressurized PF basically does not depend on coffee, grind, or tamp to build that 9 bar, but does it with a valve.  That pressuring device is very tolerant of poor technique and useful for giving chain espresso house quality at home for little work.  It keeps beginners happy and sells machines.  Unfortunately if does not give high quality espresso, and makes fake crema.

The fun part of what you are doing is to learn machines and espresso before a large investment.  If you fix up the free machine you can make a friend happy when you move on, or recover your investment. You can learn your way around repair and mods.  I believe that I read somewhere that you liked the PID concept, also available DIY.

 
D4F also at
http://www.gaggiausersgroup.com/
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D4F
Senior Member


Joined: 15 Mar 2012
Posts: 1,979
Location: USA
Expertise: I like coffee

Espresso: Gaggia Classic PID
Grinder: Baratza Forte-AP
Posted Sat Oct 26, 2013, 2:19pm
Subject: Re: getting screw out
 

This thread may help you make your own non-pressurized PF.  Pictures worth a thousand words.

"Trade: Saeco Aroma Bottomless PF for Stock Pressurized PF"

 
D4F also at
http://www.gaggiausersgroup.com/
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friendlyfoe
Senior Member


Joined: 14 May 2013
Posts: 122
Location: toronto
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Sat Oct 26, 2013, 3:49pm
Subject: Re: getting screw out
 

Gee thanks now i need to go buy a hole saw :P That looks like a perfect solution!

I just took the PF apart and cant believe i was drinking something that came out of that. Not surprised but so gross.

Put the machine back together and all seems well, boiling stuff in backflush detergent is an awesome way to clean metal parts. Someone on here suggested backing off the screw that holds the screen in just a little bit, because of lets say the 50 holes in the screen it was high pressure spraying out of only a few. Backed it off a bit and i have a steady stream coming out fairly equally, does this sound about right? I'll probably go take a picture in a minute here.

I'll go tomorrow morning and grab a hole saw, i like his idea of leaving the handle not attached and just using it to install/remove that metal bracket. Was cool to understand whats actually inside of those parts (so simple, but to see the boiler and such) and excited to see what this thing can do. I bought a good tamper but i really have no idea exactly what 30 lbs feels like. Not sure how i'm going to decide what needs to be adjusted, my tamp or my grind, and i'll have no idea when i'm actually hitting 9 bars. Hmmmmm
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