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doubleOsoul
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doubleOsoul
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Posted Tue Feb 16, 2010, 10:51pm
Subject: Mazzer SJ Reassembly S.O.S.
 

Hi all,
Today I finally stopped being lazy and cleaned my Mazzer. It was disgusting - shame on me. Anyway, in order not to strip the thread I need to completely understand how to thread the collar back on.
My understanding is to start the thread clockwise - while pushing down on the inside collar (or whatever that's called) then once it catches, turn it counter clockwise. If it creates resistance early, then stop and start over again. Is that correct?
I tried to find a video on here or HB but couldn't find anything.
Thanks for all the help. I'm getting a blister from grinding beans on my PeDe grinder (lol).

Cheri
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Taranto
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Joined: 24 May 2005
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Espresso: Breville Dual Boiler
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Posted Wed Feb 17, 2010, 12:44am
Subject: Re: Mazzer SJ Reassembly S.O.S.
 

Yes, mostly, be sure to apply pressure to the collar the entire time threading it. If you feel resistance it may be because you are applying alot of pressure and you are having the threads rubbing, or not enough pressure and the spring is causing the threads to rub. That is okay, the threads are super beefy, there is no way you could damage the threads so bad that it will cross thread without tools. That means you should only be using your own body's strength. Just give it a shot. If you get to a point you cannot thread it further, it may be trying cross threading so back it out and try it again. Also, once you thread it one thread on the collar and it is going smoothly, it is threading fine so you got it!
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JonR10
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JonR10
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Posted Wed Feb 17, 2010, 5:39am
Subject: Re: Mazzer SJ Reassembly S.O.S.
 

doubleOsoul Said:

My understanding is to start the thread clockwise - while pushing down on the inside collar (or whatever that's called) then once it catches, turn it counter clockwise. If it creates resistance early, then stop and start over again. Is that correct?

Posted February 16, 2010 link

yes, that is a good way to go

Contrary to the previous post - I would say that the threads are not really beefy at all.  They are fine threads for making precise adjustments.  The procedure you describe is a careful way to avoid damaging the threads.  

Make sure the threads are clean and free from debris and coffee grime.  It is OK to apply a very small amount of foodsafe grease to the threads but use it sparingly and only at the bottom 1/3-1/2 of the carrier threads (it will spread to the top itself)

Press down so the top threads touch but are not yet engaged.  The rotate counterclockwise clockwise until you feel the top thread slip over the edge (this action sets you up to engage the threads evenly).  At this moment, change direction in a smooth motion while still pressing down and rotate counterclockwise to engage the threads.  

The burr carrier will have resistance from the springs but it should still rotate smoothly and evenly.  If it feels like it is getting stuck then back out and inspect the threads to make sure there is no coffee grinds or other stuff in there.

 
Jon Rosenthal
Houston, TX
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kschendel
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Posted Wed Feb 17, 2010, 6:57am
Subject: Re: Mazzer SJ Reassembly S.O.S.
 

JonR10 Said:

...Press down so the top threads touch but are not yet engaged.  Then rotate counterclockwise ...

Posted February 17, 2010 link

Uh, did you mean clockwise?  Clockwise until the thread slips over the edge, then counterclockwise to thread?
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Joel_B
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Espresso: Astra Mega II
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Posted Wed Feb 17, 2010, 7:03am
Subject: Re: Mazzer SJ Reassembly S.O.S.
 

kschendel Said:

Uh, did you mean clockwise?  Clockwise until the thread slips over the edge, then counterclockwise to thread?

Posted February 17, 2010 link

It's "left hand" threaded.  Counterclockwise to thread is correct.
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JonR10
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JonR10
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Roaster: 1-lb US Roaster, Behmor 1600
Posted Wed Feb 17, 2010, 8:44am
Subject: Re: Mazzer SJ Reassembly S.O.S.
 

kschendel Said:

Uh, did you mean clockwise?  Clockwise until the thread slips over the edge, then counterclockwise to thread?

Posted February 17, 2010 link

Yes - you're correct.  Thanks for catching my error.  ;-)
Post corrected above.

 
Jon Rosenthal
Houston, TX
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doubleOsoul
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doubleOsoul
Joined: 27 Jul 2009
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Espresso: Elektra Epoque,3 MCals,...
Grinder: Mazzer, Cunill, Pede (s),...
Vac Pot: vintage
Drip: Nope...
Roaster: I hand roast
Posted Wed Feb 17, 2010, 4:10pm
Subject: Re: Mazzer SJ Reassembly S.O.S.
 

Jon, Thanks. Your instructions are clear and appreciated.

Exactly: the threads are not beefy, thus my apprehension to rotate with a heavy hand. I make a home made furniture polish that's beeswax based (and can be used as chapstick too!) so I added a tich (Canadian term) to the threads and wiped off most of it so as not to over lubricate.

Cool, thanks:)

Go Team Canada!
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Taranto
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Posted Wed Feb 17, 2010, 4:22pm
Subject: Re: Mazzer SJ Reassembly S.O.S.
 

Uh, well, I've never cross threaded the collar and being how the threads are very well machined and as large as they are, I think it would be very difficult to cross thread with out trying to. There is going to be resistance from your force and the springs bu think of it like cross threading a clean bolt and nut to the point of damaging it, its very tough to do with your hand strength (easy with tools). But now we are talking about some very large threads, I seriously would like to see some one cross thread it to the point of damage on ACCIDENT.
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Endo
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Posted Wed Feb 17, 2010, 4:49pm
Subject: Re: Mazzer SJ Reassembly S.O.S.
 

Taranto Said:

I think it would be very difficult to cross thread with out trying to.

Posted February 17, 2010 link

I think so too. Has anyone ever managed to cross threaded a Mazzer? If so, I'd like to hear about it.
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JonR10
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JonR10
Joined: 26 Apr 2004
Posts: 10,376
Location: Houston, Texas
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: E61 Legend, Livietta,...
Grinder: Robur, B-Vario-W
Vac Pot: Hario Tabletop, Yama...
Drip: Technivorm
Roaster: 1-lb US Roaster, Behmor 1600
Posted Wed Feb 17, 2010, 7:10pm
Subject: Re: Mazzer SJ Reassembly S.O.S.
 

Taranto Said:

I seriously would like to see some one cross thread it to the point of damage on ACCIDENT.

Posted February 17, 2010 link

I beg to differ.  Have a closer look - the thread tips are very fine with pretty close tolerances clearances (perhaps to help minimize the backlash).  You don't need to fully cross over a thread to damage it, all you need to do is ding the thread tip and the raised metal can gall into the adjoining metal as you tighten in and get stuck like you wouldn't believe.  

THEN you certainly will need tools to remove it.  


Endo Said:

I think so too. Has anyone ever managed to cross threaded a Mazzer? If so, I'd like to hear about it.

Posted February 17, 2010 link

"Rebuilt Super Jolly - New bearings, fresh burrs, new paint - 225 sold"
That was a recent BST post for a Mazzer with damaged threads.  SADLY the seller removed the text about it after the item sold, but here is a comment to confirm in case you doubt it: CLICK  


If you think that the threads on a Mazzer burr carrier are "beefy" then you might want to read up about machine elements to learn more about thread forms for fasteners, power screws, and positioners.  

If you want to see what I would call beefy threads then check this out CLICK HERE and then CLICK HERE

 
Jon Rosenthal
Houston, TX
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