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Discussions > Espresso > Grinders -... > Hand Grinder  
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FredK
Senior Member
FredK
Joined: 28 Jun 2009
Posts: 152
Location: NJ
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Gaggia Classic
Grinder: Kyocera hand grinder
Roaster: FreshRoast+8
Posted Mon Jul 20, 2009, 5:44am
Subject: Re: Hand Grinder
 

If you unscrew the adjustment wheel on the bottom all the way out, you will see I think 6 or 8 tiny plastic bumps in a circle on the bottom of the burr, see this picture http://www.orphanespresso.com/images/Kyocera%207.jpg

When you adjust your grind with the adjuster wheel, you will feel these little bumps, those are the clicks. It is very subtle, but you can feel them.

I too wondered if I could tighten it too tight, and I don't know the answer to that. I know one time I thought I had it completely tight, but I did not. My ensuing shot was too coarse. So now when I want to tighten it all the way down as a starting point, I make sure the burr area is clean and nothing interferes with its movement.

I'm not sure you can put it together wrong, other then putting the adjustment screw in upside down. In that case you might not feel the plastic bumps.

Check out this page, or your box, for the proper alignment of parts: Click Here (www.orphanespresso.com)
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Kenntak
Senior Member


Joined: 10 Apr 2009
Posts: 57
Location: Florida
Expertise: Just starting

Espresso: Gaggia Classic
Grinder: Kyocera Hand Grinder
Posted Mon Jul 20, 2009, 6:45am
Subject: Re: Hand Grinder
 

I tighten mine until it is reasonably tight, sort of like screwing a cap on a bottle.  I don't want to turn it too tight.  I think it is important that you are consistent in the way you tighten the adjustment wheel each time, so you know how far you have to loosen the wheel to get it to the proper point.  After a couple of tries, you should get feel for it.
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FredK
Senior Member
FredK
Joined: 28 Jun 2009
Posts: 152
Location: NJ
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Gaggia Classic
Grinder: Kyocera hand grinder
Roaster: FreshRoast+8
Posted Mon Jul 20, 2009, 9:41am
Subject: Re: Hand Grinder
 

What I thought was reasonably tight was not, it happened again today. I thought I was out 2.5 clicks as compared to a really nice shot at that setting yesterday.  So when I put it together after a quick cleaning, I discovered I could close it an additional click. So what I thought was 2.5 yesterday was really 3.5. So the true 2.5 shot I ran today ended up chocking the machine.

I really like the grind produced from the Kyocera, and it's fun to use, but the adjustment mechanism could have been designed better. There should at least be reference marks which you can easily see. I'm going to get a fine tipped Sharpie or something permanent and see if I can inscribe some marks where there are those dimples, also a mark for full tight.  Has anyone tried this? And if so, what did you use to make marks that didn't wash off?
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Kenntak
Senior Member


Joined: 10 Apr 2009
Posts: 57
Location: Florida
Expertise: Just starting

Espresso: Gaggia Classic
Grinder: Kyocera Hand Grinder
Posted Mon Jul 20, 2009, 10:53am
Subject: Re: Hand Grinder
 

That's precisely why I only take my grinder apart every two weeks to clean it.  I enjoy having it on that sweet spot for two weeks.  :)  

One way to tell if I have it right is that it takes around 120 turns for my sweet spot.  After I completely clean the grinder I grind some beans to see if I went back to the right spot.  If it takes over 135 turns or less than 105, I know I am off, and I better tamp or reduce the grounds in the portafilter accordingly.  I may get one poor espresso, but it usually only takes one small turn to fix that, and then I am good for two weeks.  I am getting to a point where I can view the grounds as they are entering the clear bottom of the grinder and tell whether the grinding is too course or too fine.  Like I said before, I am pleased with the consistency of the grinder.  The other day I made two espressi, and it took 120 and 122 turns for them.  That's pretty consistent.
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FredK
Senior Member
FredK
Joined: 28 Jun 2009
Posts: 152
Location: NJ
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Gaggia Classic
Grinder: Kyocera hand grinder
Roaster: FreshRoast+8
Posted Mon Jul 20, 2009, 6:58pm
Subject: Re: Hand Grinder
 

That's a good idea to keep track of turns.

I went to Staples tonight to pick up an ultra-fine tip permanant Sharpie and made some marks on the adjuster wheel and the plate it screws against. I just made a mark at full tight, then each at 1, 2, 3, 4 clicks. I feel much better. I won't have to fuss around with it anymore and get anxious over getting back to certain settings. Also allows me to see if it moved during grinding, which after making an after dinner capp, it did not. Tried it at 3 clicks and got a 33 second shot.  I notice I am not getting any clumping on the Kyocera like I did with my Capresso. Nice.
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DharmaBum
Senior Member
DharmaBum
Joined: 10 May 2007
Posts: 55
Location: Kansas City
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Gaggia
Grinder: Several manual ones
Vac Pot: Bodum
Drip: Chemex
Roaster: Poppery 2
Posted Mon Jul 20, 2009, 7:02pm
Subject: Re: Hand Grinder
 

I need 200-210 turns for the beans I'm using.
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lumps
Senior Member


Joined: 11 Jun 2009
Posts: 23
Location: Berkeley, CA
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Olympia cremina
Grinder: baratza vario
Drip: v60, beehouse, kone, Nel
Posted Mon Jul 20, 2009, 7:18pm
Subject: Re: Hand Grinder
 

FredK Said:

That's a good idea to keep track of turns.

I went to Staples tonight to pick up an ultra-fine tip permanant Sharpie and made some marks on the adjuster wheel and the plate it screws against. I just made a mark at full tight, then each at 1, 2, 3, 4 clicks. I feel much better. I won't have to fuss around with it anymore and get anxious over getting back to certain settings. Also allows me to see if it moved during grinding, which after making an after dinner capp, it did not. Tried it at 3 clicks and got a 33 second shot.  I notice I am not getting any clumping on the Kyocera like I did with my Capresso. Nice.

Posted July 20, 2009 link

I've been able to dial in some good espresso so far, but seem to be back around 10-12 detentes.  Mind posting a photo of your marked adjuster, or letting us know how it turns out?  Great idea.

I'm brand new to espresso, and am unsure on if I should be leaning towards the ultra fine grind with light tamp vs. a coarser grind with firm tamp.  I seem to get better shots with the latter, but don't know if It's too fine.  Still trying to figure out the blonding thing...i've only been pulling with a bottomless pf...watching youtubes, etc.
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FredK
Senior Member
FredK
Joined: 28 Jun 2009
Posts: 152
Location: NJ
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Gaggia Classic
Grinder: Kyocera hand grinder
Roaster: FreshRoast+8
Posted Tue Jul 21, 2009, 8:11am
Subject: Re: Hand Grinder
 

Here is a picture. Sorry it's blurry, but I think you can see what I did. Simply took a ultra-fine tip Sharpie and made marks at the first few detents. The "T" is where the adjuster is at full tight. Then I made a mark on the adjuster wheel itself as a guide to where it's at.

10-12 detents seems far, that would be about one full spin out, right? According to the orphanespresso website, that would be the adjustment for somewhat coarse grinds, not really for espresso.

I too have a hard time determining when a shot goes blonde. For me, I keep an eye on what's going on in the cup too. It's easier to compare the crema in the cup when the blonde starts to drop because you have a color reference point and makes it easier to see when the color gets lighter.

FredK: kyocera.jpg
(Click for larger image)
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Kenntak
Senior Member


Joined: 10 Apr 2009
Posts: 57
Location: Florida
Expertise: Just starting

Espresso: Gaggia Classic
Grinder: Kyocera Hand Grinder
Posted Tue Jul 21, 2009, 8:50am
Subject: Re: Hand Grinder
 

Thanks for the picture, that should be helpful to people.

I too have difficulty determining when a shot goes blonde, as I do not have much experience.  It seems more difficult too with two streams running!  Until I am able to get better at telling when the shot goes blonde, I have been cutting the brewing off at 30 seconds at the most.  With my current grind setting, this is easy to do as I have been getting shots of around 25 seconds or so.  However, I do not know whether that is the optimum time to stop the machine.
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lumps
Senior Member


Joined: 11 Jun 2009
Posts: 23
Location: Berkeley, CA
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Olympia cremina
Grinder: baratza vario
Drip: v60, beehouse, kone, Nel
Posted Tue Jul 21, 2009, 8:52am
Subject: Re: Hand Grinder
 

Nice, thanks for the photo!  I guess it's finding the tightest adjustment point that leaves room for interpretation.  I always am able to turn it just a bit tighter, and then a bit tighter again....I guess I should listen to kenntak's advice.

I've got it at a good spot now: about 33 seconds until blonde, with a nice ~1.5 oz. shot.
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