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Roasted espresso bean storage
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Discussions > Espresso > blends > Roasted espresso...  
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z0mbie
Senior Member
z0mbie
Joined: 26 Sep 2013
Posts: 349
Location: Online
Expertise: I live coffee

Posted Fri Nov 8, 2013, 10:30am
Subject: Re: Here we go again! Roasted espresso bean storage
 

Okay, here's my take on the things I've used to store beans.

I started out keeping them in the the bags I purchased them in.  They didn't last more than a week before I could tell the were getting old.

Then I moved to ziplock bags.  Each time, I squeezed out all of the air.  This worked well as they seemed perfectly fresh for at least 3 weeks before I started noticing changes.  Handling the bags were a bit unwieldy, so I got kind of tired of using them.

For convenience, I moved to these semi-opaque plastic "tuppeware" containers. I don't know if they were actualy tupperware, but it's all the same junk anyway.  They were terrible and the coffee immediately degraded within a few days of using them.

I finally got around to buying some containers made especially for coffee.   So I got a pair of tightvac containers, one for 1/2 lb, and one for a full lb of roast.   They didn't work all that much better, only lasting about 2 weeks before I notice changes in the coffee.  My biggest gripe with TightVac is that they are not TIGHT nor are they vacuum.   The seal is not only semi-air tight, but air does flow freely in and out of the container.  Its only when you try to force it open when you create a vacuum..And even then if you persist, air continues to seep into the container through the narrow gaps between the lid and the bottom half.  There is absolutely no rubber seal.  Just sort of held on by static. It's pretty ingenious, despite the false marketing.  Nevertheless they aren't as great as I had hoped, after reading so many reviews on them on Amazon.

Lastly I moved to AirScape SS canisters.  These have two lids, a clear one on the outside, and an inner air-tight one that has a hinged handle, a one way valve and a seal around the edge..  The idea is to push the cap down to let all of the air out through the valve, and then pushing down the lid handle into a flat position which seals the valve.  Then you put the plastic cover on the top of the canister, as a secondary measure.  It works great and is the best product of them all for storing coffee.. (next to using a food saver and vacuuming the beans tightly and placing them in an opaque bag or container, or simply in an enclosed cupboard).

I don't believe in buying vacuum canisters with a vacuum device because the seals never hold over time and vacuuming is a cumbersome thing to do every time you want to put your coffee away.
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Worldman
Senior Member
Worldman
Joined: 16 Nov 2004
Posts: 1,820
Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: Expobar Office Control
Grinder: Cimbali 6/S
Posted Mon Nov 11, 2013, 8:27am
Subject: Re: Here we go again! Roasted espresso bean storage
 

z0mbie Said:

Then I moved to ziplock bags.  Each time, I squeezed out all of the air.  This worked well as they seemed perfectly fresh for at least 3 weeks before I started noticing changes.  Handling the bags were a bit unwieldy, so I got kind of tired of using them.

Posted November 8, 2013 link

Well, I NEVER keep beans for more than ~1 week unless they are in the freezer. (Not that I wouldn't. It is just that I only buy 1 pound or less of each blend at a time - OK, sometimes I buy 19 oz. - and use them up too quickly.)

z0mbie Said:

I finally got around to buying some containers made especially for coffee...They didn't work all that much better, only lasting about 2 weeks before I notice changes in the coffee...

Posted November 8, 2013 link

I am using truly air-tight containers like these but with NO vacuum and mine are smaller as each will hold a little over 1 pound of beans. These work fine but I don't put the beans into them until ~3 days post roast to allow time for de-gassing.

z0mbie Said:

Lastly I moved to AirScape SS canisters.  These have two lids...It works great and is the best product of them all for storing coffee...

Posted November 8, 2013 link



These were considered but I use my beans too frequently...5 to 8 times per day, every day of the week. It seems too "bothersome" to be going through the closing/sealing gyration.  

z0mbie Said:

I don't believe in buying vacuum canisters with a vacuum device because the seals never hold over time and vacuuming is a cumbersome thing to do every time you want to put your coffee away.

Posted November 8, 2013 link

AGREED!

So, with what are we left?

 
Len
Len's Espresso Blends
www.lensespressoblends.com
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DanoM
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Joined: 20 Mar 2013
Posts: 358
Location: Los Angeles
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Bezzera Strega, '84 La...
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Posted Mon Nov 11, 2013, 5:14pm
Subject: Re: Here we go again! Roasted espresso bean storage
 

I buy my beans in 5 pound packages for the sake of postage then freeze all but 1/2 pound of it.  I put all of the frozen beans in these cans that are available at:
Click Here (www.specialtybottle.com)

I get about 6 shots worth of beans in a single can.  When one can runs about 1/2 full I pull out the next can for it to warm up.  The cans have a plastic liner in the lid that keeps a tight seal.  When I get a new batch of coffee I just fill the cans to level and cap, label with bean, roast date & freeze date.  Whatever doesn't fit into the cans goes into a foodsaver vacuum bag for freezing and later bulk dispensing.

I've found the small cans to be really good for my use.

DanoM: ttl8.jpg
(Click for larger image)
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Buckley
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Joined: 25 Jan 2011
Posts: 423
Location: Internet
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Tue Nov 12, 2013, 12:24pm
Subject: Re: Here we go again! Roasted espresso bean storage
 

DanoM,
Thanks for the link.  Very Handy.  If you need a larger size, an Illy can sounds like the same plastic-lined twist top container.
B
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DanoM
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Joined: 20 Mar 2013
Posts: 358
Location: Los Angeles
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Bezzera Strega, '84 La...
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Posted Tue Nov 12, 2013, 2:58pm
Subject: Re: Here we go again! Roasted espresso bean storage
 

Yes, I was using an Illy large can for my shelf storage before these.  The Illy smaller can would be perfect for someone going through more shots or more volume I think.  I got tired of vacuum sealing all those small foodsaver bags, and these cans have helped the situation tremendously!
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Worldman
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Worldman
Joined: 16 Nov 2004
Posts: 1,820
Location: Pittsburgh, PA, USA
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: Expobar Office Control
Grinder: Cimbali 6/S
Posted Fri Nov 15, 2013, 9:23am
Subject: Re: Here we go again! Roasted espresso bean storage
 

DanoM Said:

...When I get a new batch of coffee I just fill the cans to level and cap, label with bean, roast date & freeze date.  Whatever doesn't fit into the cans goes into a foodsaver vacuum bag for freezing and later bulk dispensing.

Posted November 11, 2013 link

These cans clearly don't allow de-gassing? Does this mean that you just let them in thier shipping bag until de-gassed?

I am trying to avoid letting my beans in a non-airtight container for 3 days after roasting because I have found that they do degrade somewhat in those 3 days vs. beans stored in bags with one-way air valve. Sealing them in an airtight container THAT DOES NOT HAVE A ONE-WAY AIR VALVE immediately after roast causes nasty tasting espresso.

 
Len
Len's Espresso Blends
www.lensespressoblends.com
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OregonCityMan
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OregonCityMan
Joined: 30 Oct 2013
Posts: 40
Location: Portland, Oregon
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Salvatore SES Semi
Grinder: Ascaso I-2 mini
Roaster: Torrefattore 1KG, DIY 1/2lb
Posted Mon Nov 25, 2013, 12:47am
Subject: Re: Roasted espresso bean storage
 

I roast my beans and leave them out overnight in an open CorningWare bowl. Since the beans are giving off CO2 immediately after roasting them, I don't worry about the effects of oxygen on the beans. The next morning I cover the beans tightly with Saran Wrap and poke two/three pin holes in the Saran Wrap. One day later I change the wrap and go air tight for a day. The beans are then ground for espresso, gone in two days.

I find this works as well as my old method. I used to roast commercially, but lost my accounts, leaving me with at least 300 one pound mylar coffee bags, with gas buttons. I have a handheld sealer capable of sealing these heavy duty bags. It just got to be a pain taking scissors to the bag to open, then heating up my sealer and resealing everytime I wanted a fix. I like the new plastic lined paper bags with gas buttons and wire crimp seals, but they are pricey for home use.

I now use the bags for the few customers I have left that buy 1 pound bags of my roasted coffee.
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DanoM
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Joined: 20 Mar 2013
Posts: 358
Location: Los Angeles
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Bezzera Strega, '84 La...
Grinder: Compak K10, Kludge grinder,...
Posted Mon Nov 25, 2013, 7:59am
Subject: Re: Here we go again! Roasted espresso bean storage
 

Worldman Said:

These cans clearly don't allow de-gassing? Does this mean that you just let them in thier shipping bag until de-gassed?

I am trying to avoid letting my beans in a non-airtight container for 3 days after roasting because I have found that they do degrade somewhat in those 3 days vs. beans stored in bags with one-way air valve. Sealing them in an airtight container THAT DOES NOT HAVE A ONE-WAY AIR VALVE immediately after roast causes nasty tasting espresso.

Posted November 15, 2013 link

Sorry for the late reply.
No, the can's don't allow for degassing, but keeping them in the freezer they don't degas at all anyway.

Generally my repacking goes like this:
I order beans, they take 2 days to get to me post roast date.  That's 3 days.
They sit in the box 1 more day.  That's 4 days.
All beans go into airtight containers be it the little cans or plastic tubs filled.  Into a -10F freezer until the day before use.
Come out of the freezer and stay sealed until they reach room temp.  At that point I open the can for a couple hours to let them breathe a bit.  The can gets opened up every shot for a couple minutes to breathe too.

Granted, there are probably better ways to divide and store, but this works well for me.
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adie
Senior Member
adie
Joined: 25 Nov 2013
Posts: 7
Location: USA
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Tue Nov 26, 2013, 11:23am
Subject: Re: Here we go again! Roasted espresso bean storage
 

someone mentioned freezer storage- I thought I'd rad that keeping beans in the freezer wilel lead to moisture build up? that an airtight/sunlight blocking container might be better? (I use a sealed canister and keep it in a cool cabinet and don't purchase large amounts of beans at a time)

As for bean blends: There is a coffee shop in Kansas City, MO called the Broadway Cafe- their espresso blend is the best I've found for my little machine. I' always get their beans when I travel to KC, MO and have ordered online as well- they do sell their blend online- I love it. It's not a dark/oily mess- it's a blend of beans each roasted then blended- who knows if that matters but that's what they do- and it's a lovely flavor.
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CMIN
Senior Member


Joined: 14 Jun 2012
Posts: 1,362
Location: South FL
Expertise: I like coffee

Espresso: Crossland CC1
Grinder: Baratza Preciso
Posted Tue Nov 26, 2013, 11:43am
Subject: Re: Roasted espresso bean storage
 

I freeze no prob, I usually have at least 2lbs at any given time and there's no possible way to store that in vac containers in a cabinet without it going stale fast once popped open (been there done that lol). I break batches down into zip bags with air squeezed out then placed inside Ball Canning Jars and stick in the freezer, each one usually last like 3 days or so... like having fresh beans all the time. Even had a batch today from 2 months ago, and pulled shots with no prob with only a little tighter adjustment on the micro arm.
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