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Origins suitable for espresso
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Discussions > Espresso > blends > Origins suitable...  
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ReecesPieces
Senior Member


Joined: 27 Oct 2013
Posts: 9
Location: Michigan
Expertise: Just starting

Espresso: Gaggia Carezza, Moka Pot
Drip: Ceramic pourover
Posted Mon Oct 28, 2013, 5:24am
Subject: Re: Origins suitable for espresso
 

emradguy Said:

I'll say it once more...get yourself a good grinder!

Now, back to your original question...espresso is a method. Light roast, dark roast, doesn't really matter. Any bean type can be used. Having said that, most 'spro is made with a blend and mostly the roast is medium to slightly dark. Brazils are pretty heavily used in some of the better blends I've tried, and I really like the Daterras I've had as s.o. espresso.

Posted October 27, 2013 link

I didn't realize blends were preferable. Good to know. Most of the roasters I had sought advice from to find my pourover coffee had steered me towards Single origin, so I suppose I thought espresso would be the same. I'm really glad I asked around here first. There's so much to learn!!
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emradguy
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emradguy
Joined: 31 Mar 2011
Posts: 3,119
Location: Houston
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Duetto II; Twist v2
Grinder: M Major, Macap M4 x2, VDD...
Drip: Espro presses; Aeropress
Roaster: H-B "List of Favorites"
Posted Mon Oct 28, 2013, 7:40am
Subject: Re: Origins suitable for espresso
 

ReecesPieces Said:

I didn't realize blends were preferable. Good to know. Most of the roasters I had sought advice from to find my pourover coffee had steered me towards Single origin, so I suppose I thought espresso would be the same. I'm really glad I asked around here first. There's so much to learn!!

Posted October 28, 2013 link

Yeah, it's all very subjective.  You just have to try different beans and blends and figure out what you like...and what you're in the mood for.  I almost alwyas use single origins in my presspot, and almost always prefer blends for my espresso...but every so often... :-)

The mass producing part of the coffee industry has convinced the general public that there's something called an espresso roast...espresso blend, yes, but roast - utter nonsense.  On one hand, it allows them to buy whatever cheap-a$$ beeans they can find, roast them until they taste like charcoal, and then sell them to their customers. Of course, this also allows the beans to all taste the same, no matter where they came from. It's kind of sad really, because people then start to think that it's good.  This bean burning also allows them to convince people that espresso tastes best when you pay an extra dollar for pumping in a flavored sugary syrup (which is actually necessary, just to cover up the ash flavor).  So now, you've got people drinking overpriced, over-roasted beans, and then overpaying for the flavoring to make it palatable...oh, and don't forget the scorched milk...and that's why they're making money hand over fist.  Ah, but I digress...sorry

 
.
Always remember the most important thing is what ends up in your cup!
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ReecesPieces
Senior Member


Joined: 27 Oct 2013
Posts: 9
Location: Michigan
Expertise: Just starting

Espresso: Gaggia Carezza, Moka Pot
Drip: Ceramic pourover
Posted Wed Oct 30, 2013, 2:47pm
Subject: Re: Origins suitable for espresso
 

Haha! I know exactly which mass producer you're referring to. It always amazes me that no matter which of their coffees you drink, they manage to have the same trademark taste. It's so obvious even a coffee newbie could pick it out of a blind taste test. And I agree, everything there is burned to $#!+ and overly bitter and you need the flavorings to make them even remotely palatable.
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kboom1
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kboom1
Joined: 31 Aug 2009
Posts: 310
Location: Northeastern Pennsylvania
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Alex2HX,Alex Duetto,Rancilio...
Grinder: Rancilio Rocky,Vario
Roaster: Behmor x2 / USRC Sample...
Posted Fri Nov 22, 2013, 9:10am
Subject: Re: Origins suitable for espresso
 

ReecesPieces Said:

I'm just getting into coffee and have purchased my first espresso machine, a Gaggia Carezza. I am still trying to decide on a grinder, so for now I will have to buy coffee every few days and have them grind it at the shop. What I'm  wondering is what origins are best suited to espresso? For my pourover coffee I use a Costa Rican Tarrazu, which suits both my boyfriend and myself perfectly, and for my mokka pot I have been using a Sumatra Mandheling, which we were happy with but would like to keep searching. I'm truly new enough that I'm not sure what direction to try next. I know the Tarrazu is on the light end, so not ideal for espresso, and the Mandheling is darker, but isn't quite my perfect flavor profile. Any advice on what I should try or easy to understand resources that offer some education on the topic? Thanks for your help!

Posted October 27, 2013 link



Just to answer your original question any origin can be used for espresso. It's more dependent on roast and grind. I mainly drink SO espesso and have enjoyed Tarrazu as an espresso many times . it's all a matter of your taste preference. Do you like 3rd wave fruity espresso or traditional expresso. If you like 3rd wave SO's try Guats and Africans. for more traditional espesso try SO Brazilians or go the old world blend route. As far as your grinder issue preground coffee will not net you a good espresso no matter what origins you choose. Fresh coffee is key - read the rules of 15's . Once you get your grinder try your Tarrazu as espresso again (world of difference when ground fresh). For espresso the Tarrazu your drinking now is prob only roasted to a city or city+. If you want more chocolate and caramels ask your roaster to take the roast a little farther like to a Full City roast.
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