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Roasted espresso bean storage
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Discussions > Espresso > blends > Roasted espresso...  
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clm
Senior Member


Joined: 12 Mar 2013
Posts: 84
Location: Hawaii
Expertise: Just starting

Espresso: Mypressi
Grinder: OE LIdo
Drip: Hario, Aeropress
Posted Wed Dec 4, 2013, 10:06am
Subject: Re: Roasted espresso bean storage
 

CMIN - Have you tried just storing the beans in freezer in small bar jars w/o the plastic zip lock?  I do this and it seems to work ok - I've heard that the plastic in freezer contributes to moisture condensation (although probably not if stored in the jar).  I like the idea of the small SS containers, but I believe that glass and the banded lids provides the better protection over plastic from air and moisture.
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Buckley
Senior Member


Joined: 25 Jan 2011
Posts: 423
Location: Internet
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Wed Dec 4, 2013, 4:24pm
Subject: Re: Here we go again! Roasted espresso bean storage
 

adie Said:

someone mentioned freezer storage- I thought I'd rad that keeping beans in the freezer wilel lead to moisture build up? that an airtight/sunlight blocking container might be better? (I use a sealed canister and keep it in a cool cabinet and don't purchase large amounts of beans at a time)

Posted November 26, 2013 link

Ziplocks that are freezer ziplocks are designed to prevent moisture loss from what is locked inside of them (='freezer burn').  It stands to reason that they will also prevent moisture from entering the sealed bag.  If the beans are cold when the bag is opened, sure, the moisture in the air will condense on them.  That is why many posts in these forums (fora?) advise one to let the beans come to room temperature in the bag before opening it.  Freezer bags are as moisture-proof as glass canning jars.

Another word about 'squeezing the air out': the air that is left inside is 21% oxygen at atmospheric pressure.  The rate of staling will be diminished by freezing but not by squeezing the air out because rate = K x (oxygen concentration ) x p x t, where K=some constant that depends upon beans and roast, oxygen concentration of the remaining little bit of air is still at a relative 21%, p is atmospheric pressure, and t is temperature.  By removing some air, some oxygen and moisture are removed.  This limits the total amount of staling that can occur but not the rate at which it occurs, and, alas, it take very little staling for our taste to detect stale beans, or, a flavor decrease.  There is less moisture to form crystals within the bag, but I suspect (this is not addressed in any food research that I have read) that this is a cosmetic appearance and that there is enough moisture remaining to take part in flavor degradation if the beans are stored overly long.  'Overly long' is an individual subjective judgement.

Temperature is the only factor that slows roasted bean staling if the beans are put into ziplocks or unevacuated rigid jars.  Foodsaver vacuums do not decrease the oxygen content of a bag of beans enough to be meaningful but evacuated jars would seem to have an advantage over unevacuated jars, at least on paper (lowered 'p' in the equation) and in commercial coffee storage.

The effect of CO2 upon storage is complex.  CO2 seems to dissolve in the moisture and lipid contents of roasted beans and it also seems to adsorb ('stick') to the solid phase.  You cannot taste the presence of co2 in the beans.  We all have experience with what CO2 tastes like: we have all tasted seltzer water.  If we have tasted enough of them, we can blur out the taste of the dissolved minerals in our taste-sense memory and remember the sharp, acidic taste of the carbonic acid that all the seltzers have in common.  The effect of CO2 outgassing from beans seems to be to displace oxygen.  In the first hours and days after a roast, the beans need oxygen in order to mature the flavor compounds.  This is where CO2 can retard the maturation of a roast and 'make' it taste bad, since the desirable flavors have not had time to develop.  The chemical consequence of maturing turns into staling after enough time has passed.  It is at this point that CO2 is our friend; it slows the flavor compounds from oxidizing during the time that we appreciate the condition of the complex flavors in our beans.  Either CO2 or nitrogen can displace oxygen and be useful in this regard.  Illy flushes their canned grinds with nitrogen before vacuum-sealing the cans.

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CMIN
Senior Member


Joined: 14 Jun 2012
Posts: 1,356
Location: South FL
Expertise: I like coffee

Espresso: Crossland CC1
Grinder: Baratza Preciso
Posted Wed Dec 4, 2013, 5:05pm
Subject: Re: Roasted espresso bean storage
 

clm Said:

CMIN - Have you tried just storing the beans in freezer in small bar jars w/o the plastic zip lock?  I do this and it seems to work ok - I've heard that the plastic in freezer contributes to moisture condensation (although probably not if stored in the jar).  I like the idea of the small SS containers, but I believe that glass and the banded lids provides the better protection over plastic from air and moisture.

Posted December 4, 2013 link

Yeh, not a big difference but I notice it stays a bit fresher since i squeeze the air out when defrosted with each use. Could be b/c the jars I filled to the top almost so the jar lasted longer then 2-3 days of the zips I do now since I think the smaller batches stayed fresher... who knows, could be placebo, works for me lol
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