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Tips on blending (removing acidity)
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Hoenen
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Joined: 4 Jan 2010
Posts: 8
Location: Netherlands
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Mon Jan 4, 2010, 7:04am
Subject: Tips on blending (removing acidity)
 

Hello fellow roasters,

I recently picked up several kilo's of green beans (kenya AA, Brasil santos, Papua new guinea, guatamala - the store i bought them from does not list the actual regions or farms) but I found that most of them are actually very bright/acid. I anticipated it from the Kenya AA, but not quite from the brasil and papua new guinea. The guatamala is least bright and has some nice smokeyness to it.

I cant quite handle straight shots from these beans so I would like to blend them to gain more body, and a better general taste (i miss sweetness, bitterness and good aftertaste). I'm already after some Lingtung from a shop which I remember to have enormous body.

My question is, which other beans (and quantities) would you recommend to get a nice complex cup?

PS. One of my shops offers the following: http://www.fascino-coffee.net/webshop/green-beans/page-1-20 coffees, but dont feel restricted to only these origins. :)
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JonR10
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JonR10
Joined: 26 Apr 2004
Posts: 10,376
Location: Houston, Texas
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: E61 Legend, Livietta,...
Grinder: Robur, B-Vario-W
Vac Pot: Hario Tabletop, Yama...
Drip: Technivorm
Roaster: 1-lb US Roaster, Behmor 1600
Posted Mon Jan 4, 2010, 7:46am
Subject: Re: Tips on blending (removing acidity)
 

How are you roasting?  
What is your roast profile (in general terms of time vs. temp)?  

The roast profile may be one determining factor for what you taste in the cup.  of course so are the beans, but with no other information than what you have about the beans themsleves it is hard to make a recommendation.

It usually works best for me (for espresso) to progress the roast temperature slowly and steadily from drop-in until first crack.  I like to see first crack happen at about 10 minutes (give or take 1 minute), and then pull the roast just as second crack begins, hopefully about 3 minutes afterward.

Depending on the bean, I will end the roast either just before second crack starts, or into the beginning of second crack (before it gets to s full C2 roll).  I rarely go to a French Roast (full C2 roll).  

if you can get this profiule with your Brasil Santos or PNG it should yield a nice SO shot after a few days rest.

 
Jon Rosenthal
Houston, TX
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johnboddie
Senior Member


Joined: 28 Nov 2008
Posts: 205
Location: Virginia
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: MCAL, Brasilia Mini Classic,...
Grinder: Rossi RR45a,Rocky,...
Drip: Cuisinart (non-grinding)
Roaster: Behmor 1600
Posted Mon Jan 4, 2010, 10:00am
Subject: Re: Tips on blending (removing acidity)
 

I'll second Jon's recommendation. I've been roasting my Brasil up to the early stages of second crack (about 13 minutes and 440F in the bean mass) and resting the roast for a couple of days before using it. The espresso has a very full taste with mild acidity and some nice sweetness.
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Hoenen
Senior Member


Joined: 4 Jan 2010
Posts: 8
Location: Netherlands
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Mon Jan 4, 2010, 2:02pm
Subject: Re: Tips on blending (removing acidity)
 

Thanks for your reply, indeed just after my post I remembered that I should've included that I roast with my Behmor 1600 and usually aim for medium-to-dark roast. I usually set profile 1 (which is just a 100% power run) and add some extra time in order to get the second crack either just before or just after the cooling starts (the cracking continues for about 20sec after cooling started tho).

Usually the first crack happens around 1 minute before the second crack. Lets say a 1/2 pound roast in profile 1 asks for 12:30 minutes of roasting, the first crack will happen around 11 minutes and after a short break turns into the second crack at 12:15 or so.

I should also add that I do not quite trust this vendor that much, asking for the different beans he'd just walk to his back-office and come back with the packages and the beans seem to look and taste alike. (his prices were around 5-7 eur/kilo which is like 7 USD for 2 pounds. But my parents always told me that a bad person blames others, a good person blames himself, so I wont go that far to say i got scammed or smth. It's a reputable century old coffee shop so... :P

I should give my beans some rest perhaps :)
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