Our Valued Sponsor
OpinionsConsumer ReviewsGuides and How TosCoffeeGeek ReviewsResourcesForums
Coffee: Questions and Answers
Finding the Right Grind for an Automatic Drip Machine
Cafe Espresso Machines
Video reviews, nationwide installation, leasing options... Nuova Simonelli, Rancilio, La Marzocco.
www.seattlecoffeegear.com
 
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered  
Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Discussions > Coffee > Q and A > Finding the...  
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Author Messages
CoffeeYa
Senior Member


Joined: 3 Mar 2014
Posts: 6
Location: USA
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Mon Mar 3, 2014, 7:49pm
Subject: Finding the Right Grind for an Automatic Drip Machine
 

How can I tell if I have the right grind for an automatic drip machine? What are the consequences of having to fine or coarse of a grind in a drip machine, namely the Bonavita BV1800? I will be using a Breville Smart Grinder.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
boar_d_laze
Senior Member


Joined: 21 Nov 2006
Posts: 1,388
Location: Monrovia, CA
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: La Cimbali M21 DT/1 Junior...
Grinder: Ceado E92; "Bunnzilla"
Vac Pot: Royal Coffee Maker
Drip: Chemex + Kone; Espro Press
Roaster: USRC Sample Roaster
Posted Tue Mar 4, 2014, 8:39am
Subject: Re: Finding the Right Grind for an Automatic Drip Machine
 

Too coarse -> Insufficient "dwell time" -> Under extraction -> Sour
Too fine -> Too much "dwell time" -> Over extraction -> Bitter

Rich
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
CoffeeYa
Senior Member


Joined: 3 Mar 2014
Posts: 6
Location: USA
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Tue Mar 4, 2014, 10:24am
Subject: Re: Finding the Right Grind for an Automatic Drip Machine
 

boar_d_laze Said:

Too coarse -> Insufficient "dwell time" -> Under extraction -> Sour
Too fine -> Too much "dwell time" -> Over extraction -> Bitter

Rich

Posted March 4, 2014 link

Thanks for the reply! Is there any sort of way other than taste that I can tell if its dwelling for the correct time and extracting correctly? Can I time the coffee coning out like one would time a shot?
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
Eiron
Senior Member
Eiron
Joined: 12 Nov 2007
Posts: 343
Location: Loveland, Colorado
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Quick Mill 0930
Grinder: Quick Mill 031,...
Drip: TechniVorm KBTS
Roaster: Behmor 1600, Presto Poplite
Posted Wed Mar 5, 2014, 9:42am
Subject: Re: Finding the Right Grind for an Automatic Drip Machine
 

CoffeeYa Said:

... Is there any sort of way other than taste that I can tell if its dwelling for the correct time and extracting correctly? Can I time the coffee coning out like one would time a shot?

Posted March 4, 2014 link

"Other than taste"?? Isn't that the only way to tell?? What I mean is, using your example of timing a shot, the time is determined by the taste (& grind, & brew temp, & pressure, & the shot-puller, & other less controllable variables), not the other way around. It just happens that a (typically) acceptable shot (usually) falls within a common range of shot timing. The same goes for drip.

Obviously, you can geek out & look at TDS & brix & acidity & on & on & on. Assuming that you're not changing brew temp or brew time, grind is one of the biggest controllable variables you have. Use it! :-) Here's how I approach it:
1) make sure you're using enough beans; I used to use about 50g of beans for one liter of brewed coffee, but now I use about 60g
2) start with a grind size that you're familiar with, then evaluate the flavor; what do you like?; what don't you like?
3) change the grind finer than your familiar grind & note the flavor changes
4) change the grind coaser than your familiar grind & note the flavor changes
5) if one direction seems to yield a brew with flavors you enjoy more than the others, try changing more in that direction until you start losing those flavors, then return back to where you like it best

I now grind more coarse than I used to, & use more coffee than I used to. For my taste, I found that a slightly coarser grind gave me more sweetness ("like!"), while a slightly finer grind gave me more astringency ("don't like!").

From my perspective, trying to brew (or pull a shot) strictly "by the numbers" is too narrow of a process definition.
Coffee brewing is an inherently variable process. Play with it.

 
"Just what I need - another 'geek' label..."
- my friend Mark, on being told of Coffee Geek's existence

Good, affordable espresso: www.coffeegeek.com/forums/espresso/machines/355707
Coffee's hot enough for OCD: www.coffeegeek.com/forums/coffee/machines/330079
Personal & global health: http://www.broomfieldenterprise.com/ci_12802509
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
CoffeeYa
Senior Member


Joined: 3 Mar 2014
Posts: 6
Location: USA
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Wed Mar 5, 2014, 10:07am
Subject: Re: Finding the Right Grind for an Automatic Drip Machine
 

Eiron Said:

"Other than taste"?? Isn't that the only way to tell?? What I mean is, using your example of timing a shot, the time is determined by the taste (& grind, & brew temp, & pressure, & the shot-puller, & other less controllable variables), not the other way around. It just happens that a (typically) acceptable shot (usually) falls within a common range of shot timing. The same goes for drip.

Obviously, you can geek out & look at TDS & brix & acidity & on & on & on. Assuming that you're not changing brew temp or brew time, grind is one of the biggest controllable variables you have. Use it! :-) Here's how I approach it:
1) make sure you're using enough beans; I used to use about 50g of beans for one liter of brewed coffee, but now I use about 60g
2) start with a grind size that you're familiar with, then evaluate the flavor; what do you like?; what don't you like?
3) change the grind finer than your familiar grind & note the flavor changes
4) change the grind coaser than your familiar grind & note the flavor changes
5) if one direction seems to yield a brew with flavors you enjoy more than the others, try changing more in that direction until you start losing those flavors, then return back to where you like it best

I now grind more coarse than I used to, & use more coffee than I used to. For my taste, I found that a slightly coarser grind gave me more sweetness ("like!"), while a slightly finer grind gave me more astringency ("don't like!").

From my perspective, trying to brew (or pull a shot) strictly "by the numbers" is too narrow of a process definition.
Coffee brewing is an inherently variable process. Play with it.

Posted March 5, 2014 link

This is EXACTLY the type of information I need.  Thank you so much!
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
PhillyRick
Senior Member


Joined: 17 Dec 2012
Posts: 30
Location: Philadelphia
Posted Mon Mar 10, 2014, 12:47pm
Subject: Re: Finding the Right Grind for an Automatic Drip Machine
 

A small addition to the above:  My favorite grind setting varies with the beans I'm using, and with how much coffee I'm making (larger batches need a coarser grind to keep from being too bitter).
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Discussions > Coffee > Q and A > Finding the...  
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered     Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
Discussions Quick Jump:
Symbols: New Posts= New Posts since your last visit      No New Posts= No New Posts since last visit     Go to most recent post= Newest post
Forum Rules:
No profanity, illegal acts or personal attacks will be tolerated in these discussion boards.
No commercial posting of any nature will be tolerated; only private sales by private individuals, in the "Buy and Sell" forum.
No SEO style postings will be tolerated. SEO related posts will result in immediate ban from CoffeeGeek.
No cross posting allowed - do not post your topic to more than one forum, nor repost a topic to the same forum.
Who Can Read The Forum? Anyone can read posts in these discussion boards.
Who Can Post New Topics? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post new topics.
Who Can Post Replies? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post replies.
Can Photos be posted? Anyone can post photos in their new topics or replies.
Who can change or delete posts? Any CoffeeGeek member can edit their own posts. Only moderators can delete posts.
Probationary Period: If you are a new signup for CoffeeGeek, you cannot promote, endorse, criticise or otherwise post an unsolicited endorsement for any company, product or service in your first five postings.
Learn @seattlecoffeegear
Learn all about coffee, watch videos, read how-to articles.
www.seattlecoffeegear.com
Home | Opinions | Consumer Reviews | Guides & How Tos | CoffeeGeek Reviews | Resources | Forums | Contact Us
CoffeeGeek.com, CoffeeGeek, and Coffee Geek, along with all associated content & images are copyright ©2000-2014 by Mark Prince, all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Content, code, and images may not be reused without permission. Usage of this website signifies agreement with our Terms and Conditions. (0.246200799942)
Privacy Policy | Copyright Info | Terms and Conditions | CoffeeGeek Advertisers | RSS | Find us on Google+