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wgriff
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Joined: 10 Aug 2006
Posts: 2
Location: VA
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Sun Sep 17, 2006, 2:32pm
Subject: Re: Coffee Measurement
 

What about the old adage “One scoop for each cup plus one for the pot?
That is to say what about the overhead? Is there any?

Webster
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dseigel2
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Joined: 14 Sep 2006
Posts: 6
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Expertise: I love coffee

Grinder: black & decker smartgrind,...
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Posted Mon Sep 18, 2006, 5:37pm
Subject: Re: Coffee Measurement
 

Blake Said:

You are misquoting me.

I said 7 gram scoop.  That implies volume.  I know what a gram is.  I know the difference between mass and volume.  I am sure that Bodum does as well but they still give you a 7 gram volumetric scoop with their French press.  I know how to measure it as well if I wanted to take the time.  Just wanted to gleam some experience from someone who has already done it.  Again I appreciate the response.

Posted September 13, 2006 link

I'm sorry, then I guess I don't understand what a gram is.  I thought that a gram was a weight measurement.
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moneymanager
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Joined: 28 Feb 2006
Posts: 161
Location: Indiana
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Silvia
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Drip: FP & pour over
Roaster: RK Drum
Posted Thu Sep 21, 2006, 4:33pm
Subject: Re: Coffee Measurement
 

A gram refers to the mass of an object.  I don't want to be too technical as I tend to be, and fall farther into geekdom to explain the difference between mass and weight.  But basically people use gram as a weight measure.  

The 7 gram scoop is a bit misleading.  The manufacturer is saying that 7 grams of ground coffee will fit in a scoop this big.  It's the size of the scoop (referring to volume) that's important.
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Blake
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Blake
Joined: 10 Sep 2006
Posts: 32
Location: Russellville, AR
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Stainless Moka Pot
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Roaster: iRoast 2
Posted Thu Sep 21, 2006, 7:23pm
Subject: Re: Coffee Measurement
 

Mass in not dependant on gravity but weight is.  The mass of an object is the same whether is sits on Earth or Pluto.  The weight of the object will not be.  If no gravity then the weight of anything will be zero.  The mass of the object will not change with gravity.  Grams are used as a weight measure everyday just like pounds and ounces.  Ever seen a gram scale used to measure weight?  Fortunately the acceleration of gravity is relatively constant on our planet so this is possible.  So who gives a crap?  Just want to scoop the right amount of coffee before it is ground.  Should have asked Aunt Jemima.

It is all about density folks.  They are assuming a standard density for ground coffee and thus they created the 7 gram scoop.  How do you think a doser on a grinder works?  It certainly does not use a scale to deliver 7 grams of grounds.  That's 7 grams only if using ground coffee.  It is no different than a Pyrex measuring cup having marks for ounces.  For those of you that are apparently confused on this ounces is "used" as a measurement of weight.  Filling to the 8 oz mark will give you 8 ounces of water and a 1 cup volume.  Fill to the 8 oz mark with oil and you will get considerably less than 8 oz of oil but still 1 cup volume of oil.  Come on guys there is no need to mock me.  This is simple stuff and believe it or not, I am not an idiot.  I wish I had not even asked the questions here.  The first response to my question was all I needed.  Your second post was informative as well DonTMan.

Thanks ... Blake
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RapidCoffee
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RapidCoffee
Joined: 4 Dec 2004
Posts: 1,932
Location: Rapid City, SD
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: La Spaziale S1
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Posted Thu Sep 21, 2006, 8:12pm
Subject: Re: Coffee Measurement
 

Welcome to CG, Blake! Dude, you need to develop a much thicker skin if you want to hang here. Like it or not, a "Wild West" attitude often prevails on this site. I don't see that anyone was trying to mock you.

Blake Said:

...It is no different than a Pyrex measuring cup having marks for ounces.  For those of you that are apparently confused on this ounces is "used" as a measurement of weight...

Posted September 21, 2006 link

I respectfully disagree. A Pyrex measuring cup is marked with volume measurements, not weight measurements. 8 ounces (1 cup) means 8 fluid ounces, as opposed to 8 ounces by weight. So 8 fluid ounces is 1 cup of any fluid. You're correct that fluids of different density (e.g., water vs. oil) won't weigh/mass the same.

A Dictionary of Units of Measurement states:

fluid ounce (fl oz)
   a traditional unit of liquid volume, called the fluid ounce to avoid confusion with the weight ounce. In the U. S. customary system there are 16 fluid ounces in a pint, so each fluid ounce represents 1.804 687 cubic inches or 29.573 531 milliliters. In the British Imperial system there are 20 fluid ounces in an imperial pint, so each fluid ounce represents about 1.733 871 cubic inches or 28.413 063 milliliters. A U.S. fluid ounce of water weighs just a bit more than one ounce avoirdupois; a British fluid ounce weighs exactly one ounce at a specified temperature and pressure.

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Blake
Senior Member
Blake
Joined: 10 Sep 2006
Posts: 32
Location: Russellville, AR
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Stainless Moka Pot
Grinder: Kitchen Aid Pro Line
Vac Pot: Aeropress, Bodum French...
Drip: Mr. Coffee, Porcelain Pour...
Roaster: iRoast 2
Posted Fri Sep 22, 2006, 9:10am
Subject: Re: Coffee Measurement
 

I think your are right RapidCoffee.  I appologize for for being such a sissy.  No hard feelings guys or gals.

You are also right about 8 fluid ounces being a volume measurement.  Found another good explaination of that as follows:

Ounces vs. Fluid Ounces, fluid ounces are measures of volume. A volume refers to a space, not a weight. The ounces that measure weight are just called "ounces". Their real name is "avoirdupois" ounce. (avoirdupois is French for "goods of weight".)

So when you see the word "ounce" it means an ounce of Weight, and when you see "fluid ounce" it refers to a measure of Volume. Ounce is abbreviated as "oz.", fluid ounce is abbreviated as "fl. oz."

Are they ever the same? Yes, but it is just a coincidence. Butter, for instance, just happens to weigh and measure the same. But few foods do, not even water. Examples: 1 cup, by definition, holds 8 fluid ounces. But 1 cup of water actually weights 8.3 ounces. Whereas 1 cup of cracked pepper weights 4 oz. and a cup of table salt weighs 10.3 oz. while 1 cup of honey weighs 12 ounces! These weight to volume relationships are called Equivalents. For instance, 1 cup of honey equals (is equivalent to) 12 oz.

Found at http://www.pastryitems.com/book_of_yields.htm
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moneymanager
Senior Member


Joined: 28 Feb 2006
Posts: 161
Location: Indiana
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Silvia
Grinder: Tranquilo
Drip: FP & pour over
Roaster: RK Drum
Posted Fri Sep 22, 2006, 9:55am
Subject: Re: Coffee Measurement
 

dseigel2 Said:

I'm sorry, then I guess I don't understand what a gram is.  I thought that a gram was a weight measurement.

Posted September 18, 2006 link

I hope all is well.  I was just trying to answer dseigel2 about the gram vs. volume when highlighting the size of the scoop.  I hope it wasn't taken in a different way.
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