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joemom
Senior Member


Joined: 10 Dec 2013
Posts: 6
Location: Austin
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Sun Mar 2, 2014, 4:42pm
Subject: Coffee ratios
 

Will someone teach me how to understand what a coffee ratio of like 1:16 means?

and also for cold brew how much coffee should you do for water? My device holds 6 cups and im using light roast beans with a filter in the cup

And the same for cold brew concentrate?

Thanks!
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boar_d_laze
Senior Member


Joined: 21 Nov 2006
Posts: 1,312
Location: Monrovia, CA
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: La Cimbali M21 DT/1 Junior...
Grinder: Ceado E92; "Bunnzilla"
Vac Pot: Royal Coffee Maker
Drip: Chemex + Kone; Espro Press
Roaster: USRC Sample Roaster
Posted Sun Mar 2, 2014, 7:35pm
Subject: Re: Coffee ratios
 

joemom Said:

Will someone teach me how to understand what a coffee ratio of like 1:16 means?

Posted March 2, 2014 link

Weight of ground coffee : Weight of brew water.  For a liter of water, 1 : 16 means  62.5g coffee : 1000g water.  As a matter of convenience, the classic "recipe" is 1L of water and 60g coffee.  

For cold brew how much coffee should you do for water? My device holds 6 cups and im using light roast beans with a filter in the cup

Lots of theories.  Generally the ratios for cold brew are the same as for drip or press.   1 : 14 is strong, 1 : 16 in the middle, and 1 : 18 is mild.  Note that, if you're making iced coffee, brew strong to account for melting ice; and don't forget to make simple syrup.  

And the same for cold brew concentrate?

Depends on how you're' going to dilute it for the finished cup.  If you're going to dilute 1 : 1, you might want to start with a concentrate ratio of about (wait for it) 1 : 7 or 1 : 8.  One of the nice things of working with concentrate is that if your coffee is too strong or too weak you can add more water or concentrate as need or taste dictates.

Hope this helps,
Rich
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squaremile
Senior Member


Joined: 6 Jan 2011
Posts: 84
Location: Portlandia
Expertise: Just starting

Posted Sun Mar 2, 2014, 8:28pm
Subject: Re: Coffee ratios
 

It's easier just to convert everything into the same unit, usually grams. So 16:1 is 16g or water to 1g of coffee.
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boar_d_laze
Senior Member


Joined: 21 Nov 2006
Posts: 1,312
Location: Monrovia, CA
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: La Cimbali M21 DT/1 Junior...
Grinder: Ceado E92; "Bunnzilla"
Vac Pot: Royal Coffee Maker
Drip: Chemex + Kone; Espro Press
Roaster: USRC Sample Roaster
Posted Sun Mar 2, 2014, 9:59pm
Subject: Re: Coffee ratios
 

squaremile Said:

It's easier just to convert everything into the same unit, usually grams. So 16:1 is 16g or water to 1g of coffee.

Posted March 2, 2014 link

At the surface of the earth, 1ml of water = 1g; consequently 1L of water = 1000g.  Such is the magic of the metric system.

When using the US system of weight and volume, conveniently 1fl oz of water weighs (wait for it) 1oz.  That means that a quart of water is not only 32fl oz, but weighs 32oz, and therefore, for each quart of water, the 1:16 brew ratio requires 2oz of coffee.  I feel competent to perform the arithmetic in my little, wooden head without a calculator.  YMMV.

At some point, no matter which system or set of units you choose you're either going to have to perform some calculations or count things out 16gm of water, 1 of coffee; 16 more grams of grams, 1 more of coffee, and so on until the brewer is full.  

I as well as many others usually find it easier to measure brew water by volume -- using a measuring cup, a pitcher, the line in my kettle, or just knowing the volume of my brewing vessel -- rather than putting the brewing vessel on the scale and weighing the water as it's poured.  

Rich
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andys
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andys
Joined: 10 May 2003
Posts: 857
Location: NY
Expertise: Just starting

Espresso: Speedster, Londinium 1
Grinder: EK-43,Robur, HG One, M3
Vac Pot: Yama
Drip: various
Roaster: PIDed Popper
Posted Mon Mar 3, 2014, 6:37am
Subject: Re: Coffee ratios
 

boar_d_laze Said:

At the surface of the earth, 1ml of water = 1g; consequently 1L of water = 1000g.  Such is the magic of the metric system.

Posted March 2, 2014 link

I, too, am a fan of the metric system. but it doesn't supersede the intrinsic properties of matter.

1ml of water = 1g at 4 degrees Celcius only. At other temperatures, water is less dense, and at atmospheric pressure there's a 4% difference in density between water at room temperature and water at boiling temperature.

This a a pretty small difference, but it matters for people calculating extraction yield. That's why sticking with grams only is the best way.

 
-AndyS
picture page:  http://flickr.com/photos/andy_s/sets/
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emradguy
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emradguy
Joined: 31 Mar 2011
Posts: 3,154
Location: Houston
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Duetto II; Twist v2
Grinder: M Major, Macap M4, Pharos,...
Drip: Espro presses; Aeropress
Roaster: H-B "List of Favorites"
Posted Mon Mar 3, 2014, 10:10am
Subject: Re: Coffee ratios
 

boar_d_laze Said:

At the surface of the earth

Posted March 2, 2014 link

Are you referring to "sea level"?  Because the earth's surface isn't as smooth as a billiard ball appears to us.  If one were to say, drop a coin on the top of a very high mountain, it would technically be on "the surface of the earth".

 
.
Always remember the most important thing is what ends up in your cup!
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jpender
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jpender
Joined: 11 Jul 2011
Posts: 708
Location: California
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: OE LIDO
Vac Pot: S/S Moka Pot
Drip: Aeropress
Posted Mon Mar 3, 2014, 12:01pm
Subject: Re: Coffee ratios
 

Water density doesn't vary appreciably with changes in elevation and associated atmospheric pressure. The effect of temperature is more noticeable, as Andy pointed out.

The volume of 1 gram of water:

1.00296 ml -- 25C at sea level
1.00299 ml -- 25C at the elevation of the summit of Mt. Everest
1.012 ml -- 50C at sea level
1.040 ml -- 95C at sea level
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boar_d_laze
Senior Member


Joined: 21 Nov 2006
Posts: 1,312
Location: Monrovia, CA
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: La Cimbali M21 DT/1 Junior...
Grinder: Ceado E92; "Bunnzilla"
Vac Pot: Royal Coffee Maker
Drip: Chemex + Kone; Espro Press
Roaster: USRC Sample Roaster
Posted Mon Mar 3, 2014, 12:49pm
Subject: Re: Coffee ratios
 

Quit busting my balls and -- after remembering that the context of this thread is COLD brewing -- either don't measure your water as it approaches boiling or account for the difference if you labor under the mistaken belief that it matters.  

My points are as follows:
  1. "Gram" is a unit of mass as well as weight (mass at the sea-level, surface of the Earth).  The context for "surface of the Earth," was to differentiate ordinary brewing from -- say -- brewing on the "surface of Jupiter;"
  2. The inherent lack of precision in food preparation is the reason I kept my numerical expressions to one (count it, "1") significant digit;  
  3. Coffee to water brew ratios aren't that sensitive.  Plus or minus 3% in either or both won't make a difference in the cup.  That is, a 15% brew ratio tastes a lot like a 17% ratio.  Depending on the brew method other factors like steep time, grind size, agitation and brew temperature are far more apparent on the palate;
  4. If you can't calculate water volume to water weight conversions within the limits of useful accuracy, either you're arithmetically challenged, or I'm a savant.*  That goes double, when working within the limited range of coffee brewing, and treble after you've had some practice with your brewing equipment;
  5. For Chemex + Kone, Espro and Siphon I eyeball the water into the 1L kettle -- 1L for Chemex, 1L for Chemex, 0.9L for Siphon.  I fill my six(!) non-Espro "eight cup" presses until the "bloom" is just short of the rim.  The Aeropress is also a known volume.  Of course there's some slop in the "measurement," but the coffee is very consistent; and finally
  6. Who here puts a measuring cup on a scale instead of just using the graduate marks?  If so, why?  What difference do you suppose it makes?  

Rich

*I'd be an idiot savant, but am not a savant.
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emradguy
Senior Member
emradguy
Joined: 31 Mar 2011
Posts: 3,154
Location: Houston
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Duetto II; Twist v2
Grinder: M Major, Macap M4, Pharos,...
Drip: Espro presses; Aeropress
Roaster: H-B "List of Favorites"
Posted Mon Mar 3, 2014, 12:58pm
Subject: Re: Coffee ratios
 

:)

 
.
Always remember the most important thing is what ends up in your cup!
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jpender
Senior Member
jpender
Joined: 11 Jul 2011
Posts: 708
Location: California
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: OE LIDO
Vac Pot: S/S Moka Pot
Drip: Aeropress
Posted Mon Mar 3, 2014, 2:47pm
Subject: Re: Coffee ratios
 

You're accusing us of nit-picking while taking the time to differentiate between the weight of water on Earth vs. Jupiter?

boar_d_laze Said:

The inherent lack of precision in food preparation is the reason I kept my numerical expressions to one (count it, "1") significant digit;

Posted March 3, 2014 link

Actually you used two. One significant digit might be sufficient for making fruit salad but not coffee.
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