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jpender
Senior Member
jpender
Joined: 11 Jul 2011
Posts: 714
Location: California
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: OE LIDO
Vac Pot: S/S Moka Pot
Drip: Aeropress
Posted Sun Feb 16, 2014, 6:24pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

rasqual Said:

Drip-through doesn't matter in the least, provided you can get a proper extraction with whatever water the grind is in. If you have enough water, you'll be able to do that. Obviously, if you're using very little water, you won't. But why anyone would panic at the drip-through -- as if they couldn't just add more water -- I really don't understand.

Posted February 14, 2014 link

The guy who posted the question was in fact using a small amount of water.

With more typical Aeropress brew water amounts, I've wondered, but haven't actually investigated, whether or not it matters "in the least". I do notice that sometimes the bottom of the cup is initially filled with watery tea-like fluid. I would suspect that if an effect were detectable it would be in the form of slightly lower strength (necessitating a slightly higher dose to compensate).

From a practical viewpoint I recognize that any tiny loss in efficiency matters little, so I don't panic. I just think it's sloppy. I prefer to have a valve at the bottom of the Aeropress.
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paulbel
Senior Member
paulbel
Joined: 26 Apr 2008
Posts: 154
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: aeropress
Grinder: conical burr (cuisinart)
Drip: sometimes
Posted Sun Feb 16, 2014, 6:40pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

I think it all comes down to whether you're getting drip through or drip around.  If the water's hit the grounds and now it's dripping through, even with a small amount of water, it shouldn't matter that much. If the grounds are on one side of the tube, or the filter is misplaced and you're getting water more or less untouched by coffee, then that matters, but it's easily dealt with with a little mindfulness.  Not that I'm against valves, mind you, but one of the things I like about the AP is its simplicity.
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jpender
Senior Member
jpender
Joined: 11 Jul 2011
Posts: 714
Location: California
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: OE LIDO
Vac Pot: S/S Moka Pot
Drip: Aeropress
Posted Mon Feb 17, 2014, 11:05am
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

paulbel Said:

Not that I'm against valves, mind you, but one of the things I like about the AP is its simplicity.

Posted February 16, 2014 link

I agree 100%. Alan's prototype that had a bicycle pump wouldn't have worked for me for that reason. But the pressure sensitive valve I use is very simple. It's quite possible you have one at home.
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rasqual
Senior Member
rasqual
Joined: 29 Jun 2005
Posts: 1,074
Location: Chicago area
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: *$ Barista, non-pressurized
Grinder: SMP
Vac Pot: Yama, Aeropress
Drip: Porcelain Melitta 103, Hario
Roaster: "ring roaster", mod popper
Posted Mon Feb 17, 2014, 2:38pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

What are the advantages of using less, rather than more, water? If, that is, the objective is a cup of conventional strength brew?

Let us say that Bocephus uses 3 oz. of water in his Aeropress, adding hot water after the press to create a 1.3% concentrate cup. Let us say that he notes about an ounce of flow-through, and this concerns him.

Now our Bocephus chap believes that 3 ounces is perfect for extraction (a matter on which Bocephus and I would disagree), so he quite logically wishes to ensure that he will have pressed three ounces of water through his Aeropress under these circumstances. And so our Bocephus increases the amount of water to 4 ounces. Makes sense, since he had an ounce of flow-through. But he gets a bit more than an ounce of flow-through this time. So he bumps his water to 4.5 oz for fun, and lo -- his wash-through leaves him with 3 ounces remaining in the device to press. And when he's done, he still needs to add three or four ounces of hot water to make up his final cup.

So what problems for extraction did Bocephus encounter in the Aeropress by using more water? I can't see any.
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AlanAdler
Senior Member
AlanAdler
Joined: 31 Dec 2005
Posts: 711
Location: Palo Alto, Calif
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: AeroPress
Grinder: Baratza - Virtuoso
Roaster: Fresh Roast SR-500
Posted Mon Feb 17, 2014, 4:47pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

Hi All,

For the first six months that this brewer that we now call AeroPress was in development I mixed the slurry in a measuring cup, then poured it into the press.  But one day I decided to try mixing right in the press and it worked great.

As Rasqual wrote, drip through doesn't matter.  

Repeat, drip through doesn't matter.

Repeat, drip through doesn't matter.

Alan

Hi Rasqual!

PS  Drip through doesn't matter.
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jpender
Senior Member
jpender
Joined: 11 Jul 2011
Posts: 714
Location: California
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: OE LIDO
Vac Pot: S/S Moka Pot
Drip: Aeropress
Posted Mon Feb 17, 2014, 4:57pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

Rasqual, you're completely right.

I'd somehow glossed over the part about him diluting the coffee after pressing. The only reason I know of to add water later is because the small Aeropress volume forces you to make a concentrate. But if all the brew water fits then what's the point of the higher brew ratio? It just wastes coffee. Does it taste better? I'd be surprised if this were so.
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jpender
Senior Member
jpender
Joined: 11 Jul 2011
Posts: 714
Location: California
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: OE LIDO
Vac Pot: S/S Moka Pot
Drip: Aeropress
Posted Mon Feb 17, 2014, 5:52pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

AlanAdler Said:

Repeat, drip through doesn't matter.

Repeat, drip through doesn't matter.

Posted February 17, 2014 link

For the official Aeropress recipe of very fine grind and short steep time this isn't arguable. But let's suppose you decide that a coarse grind, a steep of 4-5 minutes and a metal filter is what makes a coffee taste its best to you. In that case would you still think drip through doesn't matter?
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paulbel
Senior Member
paulbel
Joined: 26 Apr 2008
Posts: 154
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: aeropress
Grinder: conical burr (cuisinart)
Drip: sometimes
Posted Mon Feb 17, 2014, 9:39pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

jpender Said:

....let's suppose you decide that a coarse grind, a steep of 4-5 minutes and a metal filter is what makes a coffee taste its best to you. In that case would you still think drip through doesn't matter?

Posted February 17, 2014 link

Then you'd use a French Press, wouldn't you?
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MWJB
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Joined: 1 Jun 2013
Posts: 188
Location: UK
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: Rocky, Lido, Porlex, Hario...
Drip: Not enough room to list...
Posted Tue Feb 18, 2014, 2:56am
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

paulbel Said:

Then you'd use a French Press, wouldn't you?

Posted February 17, 2014 link

You get a slightly different result with French press, typically you pour water on the  grinds & when the brew is done, you pour the coffee back off the top. For FP & inverted Aeropress, I personally,  add the water first, but have little luck doing this with the non-inverted Aeropress ;-)

If you press the coffee through the bed you get different mouthfeel (for a corresponding technique) & the last part of the beverage that is trapped in the grinds would have been the first part that you poured off in the FP scenario.

I have also measured a higher level of extraction, compared to French press, when steeping inverted in the Aeropress, to hit my flavour preference.

Short, non inverted brews are a mix of percolation & infusion, so some drip through isn't necessarily a problem, in fact I have used the Aeropress pretty much as a straight pourover with good results. Longer steeps, I tend to aim more in the "infusion" territory & aim to keep as much water in contact with the grinds...which basically means inverted.

If brewing longer steeps, with <230g water, I'd still use the Aeropress over a French press, just for the quicker clean up.
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jpender
Senior Member
jpender
Joined: 11 Jul 2011
Posts: 714
Location: California
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: OE LIDO
Vac Pot: S/S Moka Pot
Drip: Aeropress
Posted Tue Feb 18, 2014, 11:10am
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

I was expecting that response.

The reasons I use an Aeropress instead of a French press are that it's simpler, it's easier to clean, it's more versatile, it's far better for travel and it more efficiently produces the small 6 oz cup size that I prefer. And as MWJB points out it produces different coffee.

But this avoids my question and implies that the Aeropress isn't suitable for a coarser grind or a longer steep. A quick perusal of Aeropress competition recipes illustrates the variety of approaches possible including those that vary the grind, steep time, water temperature and also adding water to the Aeropress before the coffee. Inverted brewing is not uncommon and I'll bet many of these competitors would welcome a simple valve.

Here's a photo of the valve I kludged onto an Aeropress. This would ideally be part of the cap but before attempting to engineer that I wanted to see how long the valve would last. I've been using it almost daily for about 8 months, or 400-500 cups total. So far so good.

jpender: valve.jpg
(Click for larger image)
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