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Rediscovering ancient coffee
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jsdavies
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Joined: 10 Jan 2013
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Posted Sat Aug 3, 2013, 8:02am
Subject: Rediscovering ancient coffee
 

Hey guys,

First off, I appreciate all of your posts.  Its a bit intimidating because most of you are much more wise and have such an incredible database of knowledge for all things coffee.  I am young and have passion for coffee in all of its categories, but I am a novice compared to you all.

I have a high interest in visiting some area of Africa (preferably Rwanda or Ethiopia).  Have any of you been to spend time in coffee farms?  I have a high interest in attempting to make a drink that may have been the prototype of what we know as coffee.  From my research, it seems that the idea is that at first, people would make a juice from the berries with water and the coffee fruit with water.  

Have any of you tried coffee fruit?  What is the taste like?  Why don't you think that it is marketable?  I am just really interested in it since it seems to be the way that coffee originated.

Thanks for reading and sharing any thoughts!

Josh
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Netphilosopher
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Posted Sat Aug 3, 2013, 8:50am
Subject: Re: Rediscovering ancient coffee
 

Josh,

Here's probably the best (and public domain) book I've seen about coffee history:
All About Coffee, by William H. Ukers

You might gain some insight and inspiration from there.  Have fun in Africa!
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CoffeeLoversMag
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CoffeeLoversMag
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Location: Seattle
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Posted Tue Aug 6, 2013, 8:31am
Subject: Re: Rediscovering ancient coffee
 

Coffee comes from a fruit. You can see actually when you visit farms like in Nicaragua. It is cherry-like fruit that ripens over several weeks. When ready for picking, they are color red to a kind of deep and becoming sweeter as they mature. The taste is like watermelon and rosewater.

A research is made to develop the coffee fruit into a marketable product. By mixing fruit into exotic juices, then it can develop into a healthy antioxidant - rich beverage that tastes good.

 
Did you know...? Dark roast coffees actually have less caffeine than lighter roasts due to the fact that the process of roasting burns off caffeine.
www.coffeeloversmag.com/theMagazine
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Intrepid510
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Joined: 30 Dec 2010
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Location: California
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Posted Wed Aug 7, 2013, 11:22am
Subject: Re: Rediscovering ancient coffee
 

Well you could try a tea made from the flesh of the coffee from verve.

Click Here (www.vervecoffeeroasters.com)

 
Less water, more grounds.
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cgMike
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Location: CA
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Posted Thu Feb 20, 2014, 3:58am
Subject: Re: Rediscovering ancient coffee
 

Hi Josh. I'm very intrigued by your interest in the coffee fruit. I've often wondered myself if the berries or their juices could be marketed apart from their seeds.

I'm curious as to why you are interested in visiting Rwanda. Ethiopia makes sense to me because it's considered the birthplace of coffee. But Rwanda didn't start planting coffee trees until it became a Belgian colony. Anyway, you are welcome in Rwanda! I have been living here for the last two and a half years. It is a very beautiful and welcoming country.

Mike
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Eastsideloco
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Posted Thu Feb 20, 2014, 12:03pm
Subject: Re: Rediscovering ancient coffee
 

Yes, it can. Verve Coffee sells a sweetened "coffee cherry tea":

Click Here (www.vervecoffeeroasters.com)

(I see that Intrepid linked to this back in August, as well.) The closest taste taste analogue I can think of is rose hips.

Here's a recipe for making a concentrate that can be mixed with sparking water (Coffee Cherry Soda):

http://sprudge.com/cascara-soda-coffee-cherries.html
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Dooglas
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Dooglas
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Posted Sun Feb 23, 2014, 9:43am
Subject: Re: Rediscovering ancient coffee
 

Maybe I'm changing the subject, but is your point to visit Ethiopia or to learn more about coffee plants and experiment with other coffee "beverages"? I ask as it seems to me that Ethiopia or Ruanda are doing it the hard way if coffee is your priority. I have traveled extensively in the coffee growing areas of Mexico, Central America, and Hawaii. Coffee farms are readily accessible in all these areas and ripe coffee cherries of many strains would be easy to source. Good luck with your quest.
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khuzdul
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Joined: 24 Mar 2009
Posts: 86
Location: U.S. North East
Posted Sun Feb 23, 2014, 1:47pm
Subject: Re: Rediscovering ancient coffee
 

The fruit part of the coffee berry is too perishable to be able to survive picking/shipping & importing to be a viable berry for sale in grocery stores in countries far removed from the growing source.  The value of the coffee bean would also make any product that could get to market pretty expensive compared to other locally grown berries who's pits have no significant commercial value.  If doing a wet-process, while some juice can be captured in the de-pulping process, it is not much in terms of commercial juice quantities.  The rest of the moisture in the flesh that is stuck to the stone is not capture-able with the standard fermentation / washing process in a non-adulterated and/or FDA safe manner.  I don't know how anyone would get juice from the dry process, but perhaps saving the milled fruit and somehow re-hydrating it?

The taste of coffee fruit itself is pretty tasty if you figure out a way to commercialize it (need to deal with seasonality, ripening time, transportation, etc).  However just in Central America, if you walk around the coffee growing regions, there are a lot of other fruits in incredible diversity and taste that are not available in the US or Europe that might be easier to develop a commercial market for.
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