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MrMug
Senior Member


Joined: 29 May 2013
Posts: 5
Location: Middle America
Expertise: I like coffee
Posted Wed May 29, 2013, 5:43am
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

First off, congrats (and thanks) to Mr. Adler for a brilliantly designed device. I bought my Aeropress less than a week ago and I'm already in love with it.

NOW FOR MY CONTRIBUTION:

I don't know if anyone's tried this yet, but the other day I experimented with a technique I call the "Double Pump"

What you do is you prepare a cup using the recommended hot water temp (to slightly cooler), stir and steep for recommended time interval and press through at normal, recommended speed.

THEN, you slowly pull the plunger back up and out and refill the chamber with same temp hot water (to slightly cooler), give a quick stir and immediately press through again, slowly. (You'll actually find there's more resistance on the second pump.)

I have found this yields an extraordinarily flavorful cup of coffee, with all kinds of flavor notes that weren't there using the traditional, single pump-through technique.

Good luck, and let me know what you think of the technique (if it hasn't already been tried and discussed).
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Netphilosopher
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Joined: 14 Jan 2011
Posts: 1,602
Location: USA
Expertise: Just starting

Posted Wed May 29, 2013, 9:49am
Subject: ...
 

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CMIN
Senior Member


Joined: 14 Jun 2012
Posts: 1,383
Location: South FL
Expertise: I like coffee

Espresso: Crossland CC1
Grinder: Baratza Preciso
Posted Wed May 29, 2013, 10:14am
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

Netphilosopher Said:

I've called this "staged brewing".  You're basically completing a normal brew, but then you're running a second stage infusion (with minimal steep time) which "rinses" the remaining coffee from the grounds.  It's sort of in-between a percolation and infusion brew.  If you do multiple stages like that, you can emulate something like a percolation type brew.

Works really well for me, I do it probably a third of the time when I'm not doing any type of experimentation.  I also do something similar with my Clever Coffee Dripper - except I don't have the benefit of forced percolation.

The method is also a GREAT way to increase the yield from the AeroPress.  Theoretically, you could do several series of pours/stirs/pumps and get a lot more of the TDS out of the coffee.  

It's how I've done something that approaches a technical espresso shot (yield of 30g, strength 5.25% from 8g of coffee - done in approximate 10g increments - 4 stages total, and keeping the brew water hot between stages).  Aside from the lack of crema, it was remarkably similar to a shot produced from an old Gaggia Superauto that I play with occasionally.

Posted May 29, 2013 link

Wouldn't that be sorta getting into over-extracting the coffee, or does that not effect the Aeropress in how it works?
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MrMug
Senior Member


Joined: 29 May 2013
Posts: 5
Location: Middle America
Expertise: I like coffee
Posted Wed May 29, 2013, 10:30am
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

Netphilosopher Said:

I've called this "staged brewing".  You're basically completing a normal brew, but then you're running a second stage infusion (with minimal steep time) which "rinses" the remaining coffee from the grounds.  It's sort of in-between a percolation and infusion brew.  If you do multiple stages like that, you can emulate something like a percolation type brew.

Works really well for me, I do it probably a third of the time when I'm not doing any type of experimentation.  I also do something similar with my Clever Coffee Dripper - except I don't have the benefit of forced percolation.

The method is also a GREAT way to increase the yield from the AeroPress.  Theoretically, you could do several series of pours/stirs/pumps and get a lot more of the TDS out of the coffee.  

It's how I've done something that approaches a technical espresso shot (yield of 30g, strength 5.25% from 8g of coffee - done in approximate 10g increments - 4 stages total, and keeping the brew water hot between stages).  Aside from the lack of crema, it was remarkably similar to a shot produced from an old Gaggia Superauto that I play with occasionally.

Posted May 29, 2013 link


I figured its been tried before, seeing how it's such an easy gadget to experiment with.
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MrMug
Senior Member


Joined: 29 May 2013
Posts: 5
Location: Middle America
Expertise: I like coffee
Posted Wed May 29, 2013, 10:33am
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

CMIN Said:

Wouldn't that be sorta getting into over-extracting the coffee, or does that not effect the Aeropress in how it works?

Posted May 29, 2013 link

Actually, the reason I tried it was because I didn't think I was getting enough extraction. I think it works particularly well with light roast coffees...really brings out the flavors. Not sure you need to do it with darker roasts because I suspect they release their oils and such much more easily.
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MrMug
Senior Member


Joined: 29 May 2013
Posts: 5
Location: Middle America
Expertise: I like coffee
Posted Wed May 29, 2013, 10:37am
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

One more tip I discovered (again, probably more obvious than I realize):

There's no reason you can't use flat basket drip coffee filters with the Aeropress. You just position the flat part against the filter cap as you normally would and it seals it in just the same. It just perfs the filter where it needs to and you have excess filter hanging off the sides. The microfilters are certainly more convenient, but if you run out and find yourself in a jam, flat basket filters work perfectly fine.
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CMIN
Senior Member


Joined: 14 Jun 2012
Posts: 1,383
Location: South FL
Expertise: I like coffee

Espresso: Crossland CC1
Grinder: Baratza Preciso
Posted Wed May 29, 2013, 10:42am
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

MrMug Said:

Actually, the reason I tried it was because I didn't think I was getting enough extraction. I think it works particularly well with light roast coffees...really brings out the flavors. Not sure you need to do it with darker roasts because I suspect they release their oils and such much more easily.

Posted May 29, 2013 link

Interesting, cool to know. I would have assumed that would have caused over extraction.
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Netphilosopher
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Joined: 14 Jan 2011
Posts: 1,602
Location: USA
Expertise: Just starting

Posted Wed May 29, 2013, 12:03pm
Subject: ...
 

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jpender
Senior Member
jpender
Joined: 11 Jul 2011
Posts: 705
Location: California
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: OE LIDO
Vac Pot: S/S Moka Pot
Drip: Aeropress
Posted Wed May 29, 2013, 12:24pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

I tried stage brewing only once and the coffee tasted overextracted. Now maybe the grind was too fine or there were too many fines in the grind. That plus the extra time involved could have led to overextraction even without a second infusion. I haven't gone back to try again.

I found it very easy to accidently dislodge the paper filter when withdrawing the plunger. This problem is solved by using a metal filter either alone or in conjunction with a paper filter.

If what Netphilosopher says is true about the second infusion merely rinsing the coffee then to maximize the yield the ratio of the two infusions should be about 55/45.
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Netphilosopher
Senior Member


Joined: 14 Jan 2011
Posts: 1,602
Location: USA
Expertise: Just starting

Posted Wed May 29, 2013, 12:51pm
Subject: ...
 

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