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paulbel
Senior Member
paulbel
Joined: 26 Apr 2008
Posts: 152
Location: Vancouver, BC, Canada
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: aeropress
Grinder: conical burr (cuisinart)
Drip: sometimes
Posted Tue Mar 18, 2014, 2:46pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

jpender Said:

They now recommend 185F for lighter roasts.

Posted March 18, 2014 link

that makes some sense to me.
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qaz
Senior Member


Joined: 21 Mar 2014
Posts: 2
Location: uk
Expertise: I live coffee

Posted Sat Mar 22, 2014, 1:09am
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

jpender Said:

I've tried to brew at 175F a handful of times. I get coffee that is unobjectionable but somehow lacking, even a little thin. Maybe I'm doing something wrong? The last time I tried to follow the official Aerobie instructions and the coffee was a disappointment when compared to the cup of it I'd just brewed twenty minutes earlier at a higher temperature.

Posted March 17, 2014 link


the best results ive got at the recommended lower temp (standard method and the finest possible grind) was with beans at their peak (about 5-10 days post-roast), if theyre older than that ideal time or bought pre-ground then the coffee typically seems to lose body through ageing, as the aeropress seems to reduce the coffee's body anyway then more often than not for me, old coffee or non-dark roasted coffee ends up like a hot toddy.

somewhere i think alan said the taste tests were originally done with quite dark roasted beans which would suit the lower temp but if im using pre-ground, old beans or lighter roasts then ive also found the results are always better with near boiling water, so i adjust to whatever ive got.

i have to say though that some of the best cups ive ever made have been at the lower temp (with beans at their peak).
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rasqual
Senior Member
rasqual
Joined: 29 Jun 2005
Posts: 1,071
Location: Chicago area
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: *$ Barista, non-pressurized
Grinder: SMP
Vac Pot: Yama, Aeropress
Drip: Porcelain Melitta 103, Hario
Roaster: "ring roaster", mod popper
Posted Sat Mar 22, 2014, 6:42pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

For fun, I boiled a rubber plunger for a few hours. Its starting condition (an old one) was "oily".

After a few hours, the oil had become waxy and impossible to remove. The result was a plunger with a permanent tack -- VERY tacky.
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Prof
Senior Member
Prof
Joined: 10 Sep 2004
Posts: 712
Location: Seattle
Expertise: Pro Roaster

Espresso: PV Lusso
Grinder: Pharos 696
Drip: Aeropress
Roaster: Behmor 1600+
Posted Mon Mar 24, 2014, 3:04pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

With my lever machine in the shop (where I bought it) with a leak somewhere, I'm using the Aeropress once again.  Reading the past few posts, I thought I would jump in.

I'm using the same grind fineness as I use with the Lusso (i.e. I'm too lazy to change the Pharos adjustment), and the same amount of coffee (8 gr) as with the Lusso.  The water goes in at about 190F.

The coffee tastes great, a little smoother than the espresso machine, and with some milk/foam is very tasty.  

The Aeropress is a great way to make coffee, and I'm not geeky enough to worry about fine-tuning the water temperature.

 
LMWDP # 010
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AlanAdler
Senior Member
AlanAdler
Joined: 31 Dec 2005
Posts: 708
Location: Palo Alto, Calif
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: AeroPress
Grinder: Baratza - Virtuoso
Roaster: Fresh Roast SR-500
Posted Wed Mar 26, 2014, 8:45pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

rasqual Said:

?!

Can you explain the process a bit more? Not to delve into proprietary testing territory beyond courtesy, but I'm really curious.

Posted March 15, 2014 link

Hi rasqual,

Not proprietary at all.

I pressed concentrate per our instructions.  Then solved this formula to determine the weight of brew at gold cup strength (TDS=1.25%).

gold cup weight = concentrate weight * TDS / 1.25

I added hot water to reach the gold cup weight, nuked that (only if needed), and served it to the tasters.

Alan
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jpender
Senior Member
jpender
Joined: 11 Jul 2011
Posts: 701
Location: California
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: OE LIDO
Vac Pot: S/S Moka Pot
Drip: Aeropress
Posted Thu Mar 27, 2014, 6:45pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

AlanAdler Said:

I added hot water to reach the gold cup weight, nuked that (only if needed), and served it to the tasters.

Posted March 26, 2014 link

Alan, what is your formula for nuking a cup of X grams of coffee at temperature T1 to a new temperature T2?
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AlanAdler
Senior Member
AlanAdler
Joined: 31 Dec 2005
Posts: 708
Location: Palo Alto, Calif
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: AeroPress
Grinder: Baratza - Virtuoso
Roaster: Fresh Roast SR-500
Posted Sat Mar 29, 2014, 11:38pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

jpender Said:

Alan, what is your formula for nuking a cup of X grams of coffee at temperature T1 to a new temperature T2?

Posted March 27, 2014 link

Hi Jpender,

I don't have a formula.  You might try a microwavable thermometer.

Another thought is that when determining the effect of a given time, it's probably best to think in terms of added degrees x weight.  Not percentage increase x weight.

For example if you experimentally determine that 30 seconds will increase 100 grams from 120F to 170F, I would view that as:

30 seconds yields 5,000 "degreegrams" = 167 degreegrams per second.

But I tried this in my kitchen and it was crude.

First 30 seconds raised 150 grams by 50F degrees (from 74F to 124F), which is 250 degreegrams/sec.

Next 15 seconds raised 211.4 grams by 12 degrees (157F to 169F), which calculates to 169 degreegrams/sec.

Perhaps this information is better than nothing.

Best,

Alan
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coffiend
Senior Member


Joined: 4 Sep 2003
Posts: 19
Location: Bellingham, WA
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Oscar
Grinder: Rocky
Vac Pot: Bodum ESantos Mini
Drip: Aeropress
Posted Sun Mar 30, 2014, 9:51am
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

I finally called the Aerobie office to get a replacement plunger. It is just the rubber part, not the entire plunger cylinder. The cost is now $4 delivered. It came in a few days. The old one was easy enough to pop off, and the new one popped on without difficulty. Now back to enjoying the smoooooth Aerobie experience.

 
Coffee UP!
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jpender
Senior Member
jpender
Joined: 11 Jul 2011
Posts: 701
Location: California
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: OE LIDO
Vac Pot: S/S Moka Pot
Drip: Aeropress
Posted Sun Mar 30, 2014, 10:57am
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

AlanAdler Said:

I don't have a formula.  You might try a microwavable thermometer.

Another thought is that when determining the effect of a given time, it's probably best to think in terms of added degrees x weight.  Not percentage increase x weight.

For example if you experimentally determine that 30 seconds will increase 100 grams from 120F to 170F, I would view that as:

30 seconds yields 5,000 "degreegrams" = 167 degreegrams per second.

But I tried this in my kitchen and it was crude.

First 30 seconds raised 150 grams by 50F degrees (from 74F to 124F), which is 250 degreegrams/sec.

Next 15 seconds raised 211.4 grams by 12 degrees (157F to 169F), which calculates to 169 degreegrams/sec.

Perhaps this information is better than nothing.

Posted March 29, 2014 link

I don't think I'd be able to read a thermometer through the screen on my oven. And it isn't that surprising that the heating rate varies with temperature, making it a more complicated prospect to predict the time. I suppose if you're using coffee of a given strength, volume and always in the same type of cup you could eventually make a chart or formula for your particular oven. But then how would you warm several cups each at different temperatures at the same time to the same temperature?

I wasn't so much looking for a way to do this myself as I was curious how you did it in your taste tests. Presumably you had to equalize the temperatures on dozens and dozens (hundreds?) of cups of coffee. So how did you do it?
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AlanAdler
Senior Member
AlanAdler
Joined: 31 Dec 2005
Posts: 708
Location: Palo Alto, Calif
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: AeroPress
Grinder: Baratza - Virtuoso
Roaster: Fresh Roast SR-500
Posted Mon Mar 31, 2014, 3:32pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

jpender Said:

I wasn't so much looking for a way to do this myself as I was curious how you did it in your taste tests. Presumably you had to equalize the temperatures on dozens and dozens (hundreds?) of cups of coffee. So how did you do it?

Posted March 30, 2014 link

I just give the brew a short burst and dip a thermocouple wire in for a reading in one second.  Based on that reading, I got pretty good at estimating the next burst or two to achieve my target 140F -- plus or minus two degrees.

If I overshoot, it's usually small enough to cool back down in a minute.

Recently I bought a few IR thermometers.  Their instructions say they are not accurate on liquids, but I found one ("Extech Dual Laser") which could be adjusted to read liquids accurately.  It's no faster than dipping a thermocouple, but a tad cleaner.

Alan
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