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Single Origin vs. Blend (For a French Press)
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TMiller
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Joined: 28 Jul 2012
Posts: 25
Location: Queens, New York
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Sun Feb 24, 2013, 3:51pm
Subject: Single Origin vs. Blend (For a French Press)
 

I have researched the differences between Single Origin coffee and blends and I am still undecided of which to go for. I heard that Single Origin would be good for my first brew using a French Press since the press extracts the flavor more efficiently. Has anyone experimented with these two? If so, which blends/single origins would you recommend for a beginner? Thanks in advance.
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barkingburro
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barkingburro
Joined: 23 Nov 2011
Posts: 178
Location: Irvine, CA
Expertise: I love coffee

Grinder: Baratza Preciso
Vac Pot: Trifecta MB, CafeSolo,...
Posted Sun Feb 24, 2013, 4:55pm
Subject: Re: Single Origin vs. Blend (For a French Press)
 

TMiller Said:

I have researched the differences between Single Origin coffee and blends and I am still undecided of which to go for. I heard that Single Origin would be good for my first brew using a French Press since the press extracts the flavor more efficiently. Has anyone experimented with these two? If so, which blends/single origins would you recommend for a beginner? Thanks in advance.

Posted February 24, 2013 link

I've used SOs at one time, and blends at others.  I've even taken SOs and (the horror) blended them with other blends (oh the horror).  It's all based on what you like, which is not a universal constant for everybody.

Having said that, I like SOs that exhibit plenty of fruity acidity and chocolate.  I also like blends that accomplish the same, but have a medium to medium dark roast bottom end.  And I sometimes mix a bright SO with Deep Cello's Nostromo to get a fuller spectrum brew that is complex while satisfying my dark chocolate craving.

I suggest you:

1) Tell us what you either like or want to experience in a brew.

2) Peruse Velton, Verve, Intelligentsia, Deep Cello, and god knows how many other highly recommended roasters and look at the flavor profiles to see what intrigues you.

3) Try to reproduce that flavor profile at home and tweak your process to try to improve the result.  You can engage this site and get great feedback as well.

Happy hunting!

 
- Michael
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TMiller
Senior Member


Joined: 28 Jul 2012
Posts: 25
Location: Queens, New York
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Sun Feb 24, 2013, 5:02pm
Subject: Re: Single Origin vs. Blend (For a French Press)
 

I'm just curious as to whether the SOs will actually have the undertones that it is described as having. Can you really taste a citric cherry undertone in a coffee? How distinguishable is it??

I really have a thing for dark roasted beans with a smoky, burnt undertone with a full body and low acidity. However, I would like to experiment and experience brews out of my comfort zone. Since I've been using a auto drip brewer up until now, I have never fully experienced the taste that real coffee is capable of producing. I live by Dallis Bros so I will probably pick up beans from them.
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barkingburro
Senior Member
barkingburro
Joined: 23 Nov 2011
Posts: 178
Location: Irvine, CA
Expertise: I love coffee

Grinder: Baratza Preciso
Vac Pot: Trifecta MB, CafeSolo,...
Posted Sun Feb 24, 2013, 5:11pm
Subject: Re: Single Origin vs. Blend (For a French Press)
 

I would say try for a SO that has some fruity note in its flavor profile.  My own efforts, working with various roasters' products, has been about 50% hit and miss, with the desired fruitiness being revealed about half the time.  Typically, this would happen right when the coffee was reaching its peak flavor after roast.  Too soon after roast and the flavors would tend toward grassiness.  Too late, and the bright flavors will have faded, leaving mostly dull roasty flavors.  But at the sweet spot, the fruitiness would manifest as the cup cooled, typically being the last thing I tasted.  I use a total immersion style brewer, so I would expect your results to be similar.

As for your more general question: is it worth trying A vs. B, the answer is always "try both, and then try that third choice, and that other one, etc."

 
- Michael
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faaparasite
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Joined: 19 Jun 2003
Posts: 290
Location: Dallas Metroplex
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Bezzera BZ99
Grinder: Mazzer Super Jolly
Drip: Technivorm
Posted Mon Feb 25, 2013, 11:42am
Subject: Re: Single Origin vs. Blend (For a French Press)
 

I don't think it matters, really.  A good blend is just as fun to experiment with as a good SO.  What's important to me is that the roaster has included cupping notes on what flavors I can expect out of the bean.  I will then adjust my grinding, steeping times, and water temperature to try and find those flavor notes.
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faaparasite
Senior Member


Joined: 19 Jun 2003
Posts: 290
Location: Dallas Metroplex
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Bezzera BZ99
Grinder: Mazzer Super Jolly
Drip: Technivorm
Posted Mon Feb 25, 2013, 11:46am
Subject: Re: Single Origin vs. Blend (For a French Press)
 

TMiller Said:

I'm just curious as to whether the SOs will actually have the undertones that it is described as having. Can you really taste a citric cherry undertone in a coffee? How distinguishable is it??

Posted February 24, 2013 link

Sometimes it's easy to find the flavors contained in the cupping notes and sometimes it isn't.  It's one of those things you just have to alter the variables in your brewing method to bring out what the roaster says is there.
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