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Hario Woodneck
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Discussions > Coffee > Machines > Hario Woodneck  
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ggcadc
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ggcadc
Joined: 25 Mar 2008
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Location: San Diego, CA
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Espresso: QM Alexia
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Posted Sun Jan 8, 2012, 10:47am
Subject: Hario Woodneck
 

I'm awaiting my delivery of this device. Anyone else use it? The hario video says to boil the filter before and after use, not sure if that's really necessary...
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Marc_T
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Espresso: PID Silvia
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Roaster: Hearthware Precision
Posted Sun Jan 8, 2012, 11:59am
Subject: Re: Hario Woodneck
 

I just got one and love it.  I just run under hot water before and after....never boiled it.  Im going out to get some OxiClean Free today for weekly washings...I store refrigerated and damp in zip lock.
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kahito
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Joined: 20 Feb 2009
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Espresso: La Marzocco GS3
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Posted Sun Jan 8, 2012, 2:34pm
Subject: Re: Hario Woodneck
 

It looks really interesting.  It would be great to have around so that if you run out of filters there is a good alternative to brew coffee with.  My fall back has been cold pressed coffee, but since it's really best as iced coffee and now that it's January, I could use another toy ;-).

I don't know if boiling is necessary, but regular cleaning is a must.

I'll post my experience with it if I decide to go for it.
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Sam21
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Joined: 20 Sep 2011
Posts: 409
Location: Northwest, CT
Expertise: I love coffee

Grinder: Baratza Virtuoso, LIDO,...
Vac Pot: Siphon, Aeropress, CCD
Drip: Kalita Wave, Beehouse,...
Roaster: Hottop KN-8828B-2K
Posted Sun Jan 8, 2012, 6:14pm
Subject: Re: Hario Woodneck
 

ggcadc Said:

I'm awaiting my delivery of this device. Anyone else use it? The hario video says to boil the filter before and after use, not sure if that's really necessary...

Posted January 8, 2012 link

I use my woodneck almost daily. Before my first use I boiled the filter for about 2-3 minutes. After each use, I dump the grounds immediately, remove the filter from the hoop, hand wash with hot water, and then use some of the leftover boiled water from brewing to soak it. After a few minutes, I change the soaking water out with clean water (in a pyrex dish w/ lid) and put the dish with filter in the fridge. Every 10 or so uses, or when the filter gets dark/restricts flow, I soak it in JoeGlo for about an hour. This regiment does a fantastic job. I also use a cloth filter for my V60 and have been using the same filter without issue for about 4 months.

The woodneck is an incredible brewing device and has provided me with some of the best cups I have ever had. I brewed a Kenyan from Terroir in it that blew me away. Enjoy!
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iHaveFeet
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Joined: 5 Oct 2008
Posts: 105
Location: Victoria, B.C.
Expertise: Just starting

Espresso: Mypressi Twist
Grinder: Baratza Preciso
Vac Pot: Not yet
Drip: Hario Woodneck, Chemex/Coava...
Posted Tue Jan 10, 2012, 11:37am
Subject: Re: Hario Woodneck
 

I agree with everything Sam21 said. Except, I store my filters in a ziplock in the freezer. The basic premise is any method of keeping them from drying out and going rancid will suffice. I flush with kettle water before and after each brew. If I flush before brewing to heat the filter and carafe and the water does not run clear, then I know it's time for a boil. I never have used oxiclean or anything, I just replace the filters every six months or so, or whenever a stale flavor develops that is not eliminated by boiling.

Like Sam said, the Woodneck dripper really is a fantastic brewer. I too have had many of my best cups with it. Given how trendy manual pour over is these days I'm surprised it's not more popular. It produces a cup far superior to anything paper can deliver, in my opinion. A very rich, silky, buttery mouthfeel. I also recently got the Coava Kone, and while I love that as well the Woodneck remains my daily go-to.

Like the V60, there are several potential techniques that can produce excellent, though slightly different, results. Experiment with continuous pours, pouring in stages with stirs in between, etc.  The glorious thing about manual brewing methods such as this is the ability to tweak your process to your own tastes. Lately I've been finding that most coffees work best for me with a continuous pour followed by a quick stir before the final "draw down". Total brewing time between 2:30 - 3:00, depending on the bean. I grind on the fine side of drip.

I've often wished that there ws more discussion about the Woodneck here. I know there must be others out there who have the same love afair with this brewer as I do. Perhaps we can use this thread as an opportunity to share ideas and techniques. ;)

Brendan
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Sam21
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Joined: 20 Sep 2011
Posts: 409
Location: Northwest, CT
Expertise: I love coffee

Grinder: Baratza Virtuoso, LIDO,...
Vac Pot: Siphon, Aeropress, CCD
Drip: Kalita Wave, Beehouse,...
Roaster: Hottop KN-8828B-2K
Posted Tue Jan 10, 2012, 12:04pm
Subject: Re: Hario Woodneck
 

Agreed on the filter cleaning procedure. As long as you wash with boiling water before and after use and store in a manner that keeps it damp, you'll be good to go.

I found cloth filters for the V60 and love using them on a day to day basis. I bring the woodneck in to relieve the V60 regularly. While the V60 with cloth filter does a great job creating a juicy bodied cup, the woodneck has taken that to another level for some of the same coffees. Terroir's Mamuto through a woodneck is heavenly.

I use a Hario Buono with a flow restrictor that gives me complete control over the flow rate of water. For 8oz cups, which is what I typically make in the am, I aim for ~30ml pre-infusion with a 20 second pause. Depending on the coffee freshness, I may wait to start my timer to allow extra time. Then I start a SLOW continuous pour and aim to be done pouring by 1:40. I allow the brew to drain for the last 20 seconds. If I am making a 12oz cup, I use a 40-50ml pre-infusion, and two 180ml pours that each last 45 seconds - total brew time of 3 minutes. I prefer higher brew ratios and always use a medium-fine drip grind. When I get a new bag of coffee, I always start at 27g/360ml + 40 pre-infusion. From there, I go up or down based on taste.

My technique is largely based on Barismo's V60 guides. I had to play around with my flow rate and grind, but once I hit the sweet spot, it has been so easy to produce amazing results every time.


iHaveFeet Said:

I agree with everything Sam21 said. Except, I store my filters in a ziplock in the freezer. The basic premise is any method of keeping them from drying out and going rancid will suffice. I flush with kettle water before and after each brew. If I flush before brewing to heat the filter and carafe and the water does not run clear, then I know it's time for a boil. I never have used oxy clean or anything, I just replace the filters every six months or so, or whenever as stale flavor develops that is not eliminated by boiling.

Like Sam said, the Woodneck dripper really is a fantastic brewer. I too have had many of my best cups with it. Given how trendy manual pour over is these days I'm surprised it's not more popular. It produces a cup far superior to anything paper can deliver, in my opinion. A very rich, silky, buttery mouthfeel. I also recently got the Coava Kone, and while I love that as well the Woodneck remains my daily go-to.

Like the V60, there are several potential techniques that can produce excellent, though slightly different, results. Experiment with continuous pours, pouring in stages with stirs in between, etc.  The glorious thing about manual brewing methods such as this is the ability to tweak your process to your own tastes. Lately I've been finding that most coffees work best for me with a continuous pour followed by a quick stir before the final "draw down". Total brewing time between 2:30 - 3:00, depending on the bean. I grind on the fine side of drip.

I've often wished that there ws more discussion about the Woodneck here. I know there must be others out there who have the same love afair with this brewer as I do. Perhaps we can use this thread as an opportunity to share ideas and techniques. ;)

Brendan

Posted January 10, 2012 link

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iHaveFeet
Senior Member


Joined: 5 Oct 2008
Posts: 105
Location: Victoria, B.C.
Expertise: Just starting

Espresso: Mypressi Twist
Grinder: Baratza Preciso
Vac Pot: Not yet
Drip: Hario Woodneck, Chemex/Coava...
Posted Tue Jan 10, 2012, 1:41pm
Subject: Re: Hario Woodneck
 

Sam, was this the cloth filter you found for the V60?http://www.avenue18.ca/Accessories/Paypal/4029%20VGNF02.htm

I've been thinking of getting one of those, as I find the Woodneck is not really suitable for brewing more than ~360ml at a time because it overloads the filter with gounds and things don't flow right. A cloth filter for my V60 #03 would allow me to brew a pot big enough for when I have a couple of friends over for brunch.  Right now I use my Kone for larger batches, however I find that not all coffees present well through that filter. It is wonderful for bright, juicy coffees, but I find that darker, earthier beans (e.g. A Guatemalan) are dissapointing or even nasty in the Kone.

That is very interesting that you find differences between the Woodneck and V60 with cloth. Any theories as to why this would be the case? I assume that the filters are made of the same material (assuming you have the Hario filter I linked to above)? Perhaps something to do with the fact that the filter in the Woodneck is free hanging and would allow a lot more seepage out the sides of the filter, rather than it all being channeled through the bottom in the V60?

In addition to making wonderful coffee, the Woodneck is quite simply beautiful, from an aesthetics point of view. I think it is the perfect choice for brewing a cup for that special someone and showing her/him just how incredible coffee can be. (while winning some serious sex-appeal points in the process, of course... ;) However, for anyone who would like to have a cloth dripper in their repertoire but doesn't feel the need to spend $50 on an elegant piece of glass, it should be noted that you can buy replacement filters and handle rings, and just use whatever vessel works for you. I discovered that the ring sits perfectly on top of an 8 cup Bodum the other day when I reached for it to catch the drippings. So, if you have a french press (and what coffee geek doesn't?) this would be a perfectly suitable option. Heck, you could even just hold it over your cup with your non pouring hand, provided you've got a steady hand in the morning before your coffee fix.

Sam, do you adjust your grind depending on what volume you're brewing (6 - 8 oz vs. 12 - 14), or just your brew time?

Brendan
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Sam21
Senior Member


Joined: 20 Sep 2011
Posts: 409
Location: Northwest, CT
Expertise: I love coffee

Grinder: Baratza Virtuoso, LIDO,...
Vac Pot: Siphon, Aeropress, CCD
Drip: Kalita Wave, Beehouse,...
Roaster: Hottop KN-8828B-2K
Posted Wed Jan 11, 2012, 9:05am
Subject: Re: Hario Woodneck
 

iHaveFeet Said:

Sam, was this the cloth filter you found for the V60?http://www.avenue18.ca/Accessories/Paypal/4029%20VGNF02.htm

I've been thinking of getting one of those, as I find the Woodneck is not really suitable for brewing more than ~360ml at a time because it overloads the filter with gounds and things don't flow right. A cloth filter for my V60 #03 would allow me to brew a pot big enough for when I have a couple of friends over for brunch.  Right now I use my Kone for larger batches, however I find that not all coffees present well through that filter. It is wonderful for bright, juicy coffees, but I find that darker, earthier beans (e.g. A Guatemalan) are dissapointing or even nasty in the Kone.

That is very interesting that you find differences between the Woodneck and V60 with cloth. Any theories as to why this would be the case? I assume that the filters are made of the same material (assuming you have the Hario filter I linked to above)? Perhaps something to do with the fact that the filter in the Woodneck is free hanging and would allow a lot more seepage out the sides of the filter, rather than it all being channeled through the bottom in the V60?

In addition to making wonderful coffee, the Woodneck is quite simply beautiful, from an aesthetics point of view. I think it is the perfect choice for brewing a cup for that special someone and showing her/him just how incredible coffee can be. (while winning some serious sex-appeal points in the process, of course... ;) However, for anyone who would like to have a cloth dripper in their repertoire but doesn't feel the need to spend $50 on an elegant piece of glass, it should be noted that you can buy replacement filters and handle rings, and just use whatever vessel works for you. I discovered that the ring sits perfectly on top of an 8 cup Bodum the other day when I reached for it to catch the drippings. So, if you have a french press (and what coffee geek doesn't?) this would be a perfectly suitable option. Heck, you could even just hold it over your cup with your non pouring hand, provided you've got a steady hand in the morning before your coffee fix.

Sam, do you adjust your grind depending on what volume you're brewing (6 - 8 oz vs. 12 - 14), or just your brew time?

Brendan

Posted January 10, 2012 link

That is the type of filter I found. They are a bit hard to come by, but I have really enjoyed using it. While the material is the same, I think the woodneck filter may be a bit more thin. Plus, the way the water moves through the filter and interacts with the V60 is different. In the woodneck, the filter is suspended, while in the V60, it moves out the sides and down the ridges. The differences weren't huge, but I found the body to be a bit juicier in the woodneck. I use the cloth with my 02 V60 and it's a perfect fit. The markings on the side of the filter line up with a 180/240/360ml grounds level. So, when I brew a "2-cup" 240ml brew, the bed of grounds touches that 2-cup marking when dry and the upper marking after brewing. I am not sure if it would be a little small for your size 03 V60, as I have no experience with that size, but it does a wonderful job. In general, I love brewing with cloth filters and only use paper if I am traveling.

I tend to only brew 8oz servings, but I rarely adjust the grind size when I move to the bigger servings. The timings are almost spot on each time. For instance, I am for a two minute brew time with an 8oz serving and a three minute brew time with a 12oz serving. Using the same grind size (21-22G) on my Preciso, both sizes (for my current bean - home roasted Guat), finish their drawdown right around 1-2 seconds of the 2/3 minute mark. I find that the freshness of the bean has a large effect on the grind setting, so I keep mental notes about what worked and what I can tweak. The Barismo flow restrictor paired with the Buono has been the ultimate tool for controlling flow rate and having nearly 100% control over the overall brew time. I am able to consistently pour 240ml of water over 80 seconds and be finished right at the 20 second mark for final drawdown. If the grind setting is correct, the brew finishes right as time expires. So, honestly, I don't find any need to adjust grind with change in brewing volume, although I stick to 8oz brews most of the time.
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ggcadc
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ggcadc
Joined: 25 Mar 2008
Posts: 147
Location: San Diego, CA
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: QM Alexia
Grinder: Mazzer mini E, Virtuoso,...
Vac Pot: Yama 3 cup
Drip: All of them
Roaster: Behmor 1600
Posted Wed Jan 11, 2012, 11:33am
Subject: Re: Hario Woodneck
 

I'm so glad to have such an overwhelmingly positive response. I just brewed my first cup with this and it's really quite clear, full(for a gesha[Don Pachi from bird rock roasters]) and clean; thought it was important the inaugural brew be with some great coffee. I rinsed the filter through with hot water and I have no taste that I can tell from it. I've been using a regular one hole pourover for a few years and never got into the v60 magic brewing stuff. This seemed more my speed with a more permanent filter that isnt metal, and it's just different looking, much like my siphon  brewer it will make people curious about coffee.

Thanks so much for the advice and I will likely write up my thoughts after a few more brews since this bean is a bit special, makes it easy to love the method.
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iHaveFeet
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Joined: 5 Oct 2008
Posts: 105
Location: Victoria, B.C.
Expertise: Just starting

Espresso: Mypressi Twist
Grinder: Baratza Preciso
Vac Pot: Not yet
Drip: Hario Woodneck, Chemex/Coava...
Posted Wed Jan 11, 2012, 11:37am
Subject: Re: Hario Woodneck
 

Ah, Sam, cool to hear that you have a Preciso! I just got one a couple of days ago myself (as you saw from my other thread) and so far I am just loving it. It is my first experience with a grinder of this quality. I'm glad to know that you are right in the same range for your Woodneck grind as I am (21,22, maybe 23 depending on the coffee). You are right that the freshness of the bean makes a huge difference to the required grind. Do you find yourself using then micro dial when grinding for pour over and other "brewed coffee" methods, or is that feature only really needed for espresso? I have not yet dived into espresso at home, but I got the Preciso knowing that when I did get a machine down the road I didn't want to have to buy another grinder. I haven't even touched the micro dial yet; even the macro settings are so much smaller than what I'm used to. The ability to fine tune my grind to such a high degree is taking me on a wild learning curve!

Ok, I know this thread is about cloth pour over and not the Preciso...  He's a question to which no one can agree on the answer, and I still haven't decided what works best for my own method: do you aim to have the grounds making an inverse cone that conforms to the shape of the cloth once the water is drained, or an even mound? It would seem to me that these two results would be due to very different flow patterns within the filter and thus potentially have a significant impact on the results in the cup. However, I have yet to pinpoint what, exactly, that difference is, or what I prefer. Thoughts?

Brendan
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