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Hario v60 Pour-Over - My Brew Guide
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JDHarding
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JDHarding
Joined: 31 Aug 2007
Posts: 1,107
Location: WA, USA
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Ascaso Steel Pro, CBTL...
Grinder: Nuova Simonelli MDX,...
Vac Pot: None
Drip: Hario v60
Roaster: Behmor, Fresh Roast
Posted Sat Oct 2, 2010, 9:17am
Subject: Hario v60 Pour-Over - My Brew Guide
 

This is my guide on how to properly brew pour-over coffee using a manual pour-over cone brewer. I will be focusing this guide on the Hario v60 pour-over brewer as I feel, in my opinion, that it is the best brewer for this purpose, but other brewers will work too.

I should mention that this is only my personal guide on how I brew with a pour-over brewer and techniques I've been successful with. This is in no way the "definitive guide" on how to use a pour-over brewer. This should only be viewed as a template to get you started. Then you can develop your own techniques and methods you use to brew your perfect cup of handmade coffee.

  1. Requirements

- Hario's Buono Kettle or any goose-neck kettle.

- Hario's v60 pour-over cone or any manual pour-over coffee brewer cone.

- Boiled water at the temperature of 190F to 205F. Exact temperature is personal preference.

- A scale capable of weighing to .1 degree of a gram and also able to weigh in ounces. Pocket scales are best suited for this task.


  1. Measurements, Grind Size, and Timing

I've previously recommended a certain amount of water to a certain amount of coffee. After a while I realized in my years of using the pour-over method of brewing coffee that everyone has different tastes when it comes to coffee. The amount of water to ground coffee varies from person to person so I can't really suggest a certain amount of each. I recommend a bare minimum of at least 1 gram of ground coffee to every 1 ounce of water. The ratio I personally use is 2.3 grams of ground coffee to every 1 ounce of water. This means that in order to make a 9 ounce cup of coffee I need to measure and grind 20.7 grams of coffee. I typically round that amount up to the nearest point, so 21 grams. I then add 2 grams because grinders tend to keep 1 or 2 grams of coffee inside them. So my total amount is 23 grams before grinding, which evens out to 21 grams of ground coffee. If you're using pre-ground coffee you don't need to add 2 grams to your measurements.

As for grind fineness, this is also tricky. The finer you grind the stronger your finished coffee will be. You can literally use any grind you want with the pour-over method. If you're using a paper filter, you can grind all the way to almost an espresso grind. If you're using a filter other than paper an espresso grind will only cause a lot of soot or coffee powder to get into your finished brew. If you like that sort of thing go ahead and use that kind of grind with your filter. It won't damage your filter. For me, I prefer a cleaner cup, so I use paper filters.

Time is another factor in this process. I've previously suggested brewing your coffee in under 3 minutes. But in actual testing the amount of time required doesn't matter. Seriously, you can brew your coffee for half an hour if you want. There is no way you can over-extract your coffee by taking a long time to brew it. As long as the amount of grounds to water ratio is intact it's okay to spend a lot of time making your coffee. I do suggest it be under 10 minutes total time or your water will get awfully cold by the time you're done unless you have a kettle capable of holding the temperature.


  1. Filters

There's several filter choices for the pour-over brewers. Paper filters will keep the most coffee powder out of the finished brew, making a cleaner cup. Cloth and mesh filters will allow more powder through. It depends on your personal preference. If you do use a cloth filter make sure to store it in water in the fridge. They tend to dry out and become unusable. They're also prone to attract bacteria if left to dry in the open. They can also stiffen and become brittle. This is especially true for hemp filters.
I personally use Melitta's bamboo paper filters. I've tried several others, but the bamboo filters are among the best. They leave the least amount of paper taste in the finished brew. They can also be folded in any manner of fashion to properly seat inside your brewer.


  1. Clean & Tidy

One mistake a lot of people seem to make is washing grounds down off the sides of the filter to make it a little "cleaner looking". With the way the pour-over brewers are designed, that wash water will simply go right down the sides of the brewer and will bypass the coffee grounds entirely. So your finished brew will be weak tasting. Be sure that all the water you pour goes on the grounds, and not the filter or brewer.
A good tip I can give is to leave about 1 inch of space between the side of the brewer and the bed of coffee and do not pour any water into that 1 inch area.


  1. Preparation

Here are some preparation tips you should use prior to making coffee.
- Put whichever brew vessel you plan to brew your coffee into (carafe, cup, whatever) onto your scale and zero out (tare) the weight. Make sure the scale is weighing in ounces and not grams. Then fill your vessel up with regular water until the scale reads the amount of coffee you plan to make. Then take some sort of mark, be it permanent marker or just a piece of tape, and mark or tape just above the water line. This is how much coffee you will be making. Pour the water out after you've made your mark.

- Other people, instead of making a mark on the vessel, will use the scale while brewing their coffee to weigh how much water they've used and will stop once they've used the desired amount of water. This is okay for some scales, but many cheaper scales will automatically shut off within a certain amount of time. If your scale doesn't have an auto shut off feature, you can try this method.


  1. Pre-Brew

Here are the pre-brew steps you should take prior to brewing your coffee.

  1. Put whichever filter you've decided to use in your brewer.

  2. Put the brewer over whatever you brew your coffee into. Carafe, cup, some sort of vessel.

  3. Rinse the brewer and the filter inside with some of your boiled water. Make sure to wash off all of the filter. This not only warms up the brewer and brewing vessel, but also washes off any residue in your filter and moistens your filter.

  4. Take the brewer off of your vessel and fill your vessel up with more of your boiled water until it's at the same volume of coffee you plan to make. This warms things up a bit. Not good when you're brewing hot coffee and your vessel is cold and cools down the coffee you're trying to make.

  5. Dump the water in the vessel out.

  6. Put your grinds in the filter and shake the brewer to level them. Other people make an indent of some kind in the grounds bed, but I haven't really noticed a difference by doing this. Do not bang the brewer on a surface to flatten the bed as this will compact the grounds which will make it difficult for water to get through them.


  1. Pre-Wet

These are the steps you take after the pre-brew steps.

  1. Pour water into the brewer until the water covers the grounds. This wettens the coffee grounds. If you're using fresh coffee this will also de-gas the coffee. You'll see air bubbles and such forming on the bed of grounds and the bed of grounds will double in size. This is called a blooming effect, or simply "bloom".

  2. Let the brewer sit for 0:30 to 0:40 seconds. Let it soak and bloom.


  1. Brewing

Now to choose a method of brewing that best suits your personal preference.

  1. All of these methods start by using the pre-brew and pre-wet instructions. So do those steps first before proceeding.

  2. Only choose one of the following methods:

- Saturation Method (fast): Pour a stream of water in a circular motion around the center of the grounds until the water level is 1/2 an inch over the bed of grounds. Wait until the coffee coming out of the bottom of the brewer has slowed to drips.

- Steady Pour Method (kinda slow): Pour a stream of water in a circular motion around the center of the grounds making the coffee look wet but not raised above the bed of grounds. Wait until the coffee coming out of the bottom of the brewer has slowed to drips.

- Continuous Pour Method (slow): Pour a thin stream of water in a spiraling motion from the center of the grounds outward making the coffee raise slightly above the bed of grounds.

- Drip Method (super slow): Pour a small amount of your water, about 1 tablespoon worth, into the center of the grounds. Wait 5 seconds.

  1. Repeat whichever method you've chosen until all of the water you've previously measured in your coffee to water ratio has been used and your desired amount of coffee is waiting in your vessel.


Whichever method you have used you should now have some very tasty coffee. Drink it however you like to drink coffee. This method of making coffee requires practice and patience. If the coffee you made doesn't taste right, you most likely need to change your ground coffee to water ratio measurements or the grind might not be right.


Guide last updated on October 26th, 2013

 
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BoldJava
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BoldJava
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Posted Sat Oct 2, 2010, 9:52am
Subject: Re: Mastered the Hario v60
 

JDHarding Said:

After months of tinkering, grinding, and playing with my ceramic Hario v60, I think I've finally gotten consistently good coffee from it for a few months now. This is the method in which I use the v60...!

Posted October 2, 2010 link

Nicely stated.  I would just add, "Let water sit after boil for 45-50 seconds."  Maybe you said that and I missed it.  If I can suggest, add it to the Hario V60 review.  We only have a couple up there.

B|Java

 
"On the trail for the goats' grail..."

Dave Borton
St Paul, MN
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JDHarding
Senior Member
JDHarding
Joined: 31 Aug 2007
Posts: 1,107
Location: WA, USA
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Ascaso Steel Pro, CBTL...
Grinder: Nuova Simonelli MDX,...
Vac Pot: None
Drip: Hario v60
Roaster: Behmor, Fresh Roast
Posted Sat Oct 2, 2010, 10:12am
Subject: Re: Mastered the Hario v60
 

BoldJava Said:

Nicely stated.  I would just add, "Let water sit after boil for 45-50 seconds."  Maybe you said that and I missed it.  If I can suggest, add it to the Hario V60 review.  We only have a couple up there.

Posted October 2, 2010 link

Pouring the boiled water from the kettle to a cold Buono or other goose-neck kettle will bring it down to proper brewing temperature. That cold metal will lower the degrees by 10F.

 
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e53er
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e53er
Joined: 21 Apr 2002
Posts: 162
Location: L.A.
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: NS Oscar, Solis SL90
Grinder: Mazzer Mini, Solis Maestro
Vac Pot: Bodum Santos
Drip: KMB, Hario V60 dripper
Roaster: Poppery II
Posted Mon Oct 4, 2010, 7:42am
Subject: Re: Mastered the Hario v60
 

I have both the 01 and 02 sizes. Is the total brew time the constant, regardless of the amount of brewed coffee? To keep the total time to 2.5 minutes, the grind and/or pour rate will need to be adjusted to the amount of coffee you are brewing. Same goes for the volume of water for pre-wetting. The amount of brewed coffee can vary from ~6 oz. with the 01 and up to ~24 oz. with the 02.

As a reference, I have had the V60 at Blue Bottle, Intelligentsia and Bird Rock. They are all using water at around 203F and keep the total brew time to about 2.5 minutes to brew a single cup.
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krewjones
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Joined: 4 Oct 2010
Posts: 3
Location: st louis
Expertise: I love coffee

Drip: hario v60
Posted Mon Oct 4, 2010, 3:13pm
Subject: Re: Mastered the Hario v60
 

i always see "grams" used but i have no desire to buy a scale

does anyone know how this translates to scoops? i usually use one scoop per 6 oz's of water. the hario v60 scoop has a max of two 2 tablespoons unground. i usually toss in 2.5 tablespoons per 12 ounces of water or so.

any recommendations?
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johnnyb3
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Joined: 29 Mar 2010
Posts: 189
Location: Anaheim, CA
Expertise: I love coffee

Grinder: Baratza Maestro Plus refurb
Vac Pot: Bodum Santos
Drip: Chemex
Posted Mon Oct 4, 2010, 4:34pm
Subject: Re: Mastered the Hario v60
 

krewjones Said:

i always see "grams" used but i have no desire to buy a scale

does anyone know how this translates to scoops? i usually use one scoop per 6 oz's of water. the hario v60 scoop has a max of two 2 tablespoons unground. i usually toss in 2.5 tablespoons per 12 ounces of water or so.

any recommendations?

Posted October 4, 2010 link

I'd really recommend you buy a scale! For the money one spends on coffee and brewing devices, it's worth $20 or so to ensure that you use the correct amount of coffee every time -- however you define correct. Besides which, a kitchen scale is a nice multitasker.
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JDHarding
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JDHarding
Joined: 31 Aug 2007
Posts: 1,107
Location: WA, USA
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Ascaso Steel Pro, CBTL...
Grinder: Nuova Simonelli MDX,...
Vac Pot: None
Drip: Hario v60
Roaster: Behmor, Fresh Roast
Posted Mon Oct 4, 2010, 5:01pm
Subject: Re: Hario v60 - My Brew Guide
 

I updated the guide and switched some info around. I think it's a little clearer now, and doesn't reflect the grinder I use, the filters I use, or the size of the Hario I use. It's a little more user-friendly, and should work for everyone now.

 
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BoldJava
Senior Member
BoldJava
Joined: 2 Jun 2006
Posts: 1,545
Location: St Paul, MN
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: '82 Oly Cremina 67
Grinder: Macap MC4 Doserless Stepped
Vac Pot: Yamas
Drip: Hario, Beehouse, Cilio, Kone...
Roaster: RK Drum and Gene
Posted Mon Oct 4, 2010, 5:31pm
Subject: Re: Hario v60 - My Brew Guide
 

JDHarding Said:

Total brew time (1 cup = 6 ounces):

2 - 3 cups , total brew time of 2:30 min
4 - 7 cups, total brew time of 3:00 min
8 - 12 cups, total brew time of 4:00 min

...
I updated the guide and switched some info around. I think it's a little clearer now, and doesn't reflect the grinder I use, the filters I use, or the size of the Hario I use. It's a little more user-friendly, and should work for everyone now.

Posted October 4, 2010 link

By context, this would lead a reader to believe s/he could use a Hario V60 #2 to get 72 ounces.  Seems unintentionally misleading. Intelligentsia suggests 10-16 oz, though I use it for 21 oz.  There is a #3 out there but even then, I wouldn't push it beyond 30 oz.

Click Here (shop.hariousa.com)

B|Java

 
"On the trail for the goats' grail..."

Dave Borton
St Paul, MN
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JDHarding
Senior Member
JDHarding
Joined: 31 Aug 2007
Posts: 1,107
Location: WA, USA
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Ascaso Steel Pro, CBTL...
Grinder: Nuova Simonelli MDX,...
Vac Pot: None
Drip: Hario v60
Roaster: Behmor, Fresh Roast
Posted Mon Oct 4, 2010, 8:15pm
Subject: Re: Hario v60 - My Brew Guide
 

I updated the guide again. This is starting to confuse even me.

 
The Video Game Music Place - www.vgmplace.com
The Sonic Corner - www.soniccorner.com
JD Harding . org - www.jdharding.org
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JDHarding
Senior Member
JDHarding
Joined: 31 Aug 2007
Posts: 1,107
Location: WA, USA
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Ascaso Steel Pro, CBTL...
Grinder: Nuova Simonelli MDX,...
Vac Pot: None
Drip: Hario v60
Roaster: Behmor, Fresh Roast
Posted Tue Oct 5, 2010, 10:08am
Subject: Re: Hario v60 - My Brew Guide
 

Couple things I forgot that I added to the guide. Mostly the dome shape that forms on the surface, plus how high the water should be filled during each pouring. I just did this method again and paid close attention to the details. Again, it's tough writing this method down when there's so many variables, skill, and technique involved. I'm not saying my way is the only way, but I find it's the best way I know to make some tasty coffee.

 
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