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Aerobie Aeropress
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AlanAdler
Senior Member
AlanAdler
Joined: 31 Dec 2005
Posts: 711
Location: Palo Alto, Calif
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: AeroPress
Grinder: Baratza - Virtuoso
Roaster: Fresh Roast SR-500
Posted Tue Jan 17, 2006, 6:17pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

Hi nonforma,

Yes, the AeroPress is MUCH easier to clean.

And the bottom filter has a functional advantage.  In a French press, the grounds float up against the screen and tend block the flow.  The AeroPress (with its filter at the bottom) is easier to push.  

The art of AeroPressing is to push gently (about 15lbs) and hold that pressure for 20-30 seconds while the compressed air in the chamber pushes the liquid through.  After the liquid has run through, the plunger will descend to the puck and stop.   At that point you lift the press off the cup, remove the cap, and eject the puck into the trash.

Sincerely,

Alan
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dsharp88
Senior Member


Joined: 22 Dec 2001
Posts: 73
Location: Metairie, LA
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: LaCimbali Junior D/1
Grinder: Mini Mazzer, Solis Maestro
Vac Pot: Yama
Drip: Chemex, 1-cup Melitta
Roaster: Alpenrost, FreshRoast+,...
Posted Tue Jan 17, 2006, 8:33pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

Alan, you were right about the Melitta filters being the same as the ones you have included with the Aeropress. I tried the Melitta brand, which may have been even more pourous. I also tried Chemex filters, which are definitely thicker, but still got some drip through at regular coffee levels.

It seems that 23 g of coffee would equate to a stovetop moka pot type of brew - strong enough for lattes to be sure - and it cuts down the drip through. I also agree that true 9 bar espresso doesn't require much crema be formed and can still be excellent, but true 9 bar pressure is required to release the insolubles in ground coffee that give the richness to the real thing.

So what we're getting out of 23 g of coffee is a good strong base that can work with milk drinks, but is only releasing the solubles (the water-based product) in the coffee. As caffeine is water-soluble based, that likely means decent punch but not so overwhelming in just 15 or so seconds so ruk, who wasn't sure if it would produce a kicka** coffee, truly has nothing to worry about.  It's certainly also much different than a french press as this doesn't leave any sludge in the bottom of the cup.

The rest of this post is all personal preference. I like a longer total immersion and the SCAA standards of coffee regarding amount and temperature for full complexity, so I have found an extremely easy workaround. I put the medium-ground coffee (12-13g) in in a stainless steel steaming pitcher (great funnel, by the way!), add 7 ounces of 200 degree water, give a quick stir (great stirring rod, too, Alan!) and let the immersion happen. The steel holds the heat better than the glass of a french press, but you can also use that or any other good, heat-retaining container.  I recommend keeping it covered during the immersion/extraction phase to retain even more of the heat. After three minutes of immersing a medium grind, the full extraction has taken place.

I pour it all into the Aeropress and plunge immediately. This allows for the full flavor of a french press coffee while being much cleaner. It's much richer than a filter-cone drip (which doesn't allow total immersion time of the grinds), and is extremely easy to clean up. It literally takes two seconds to rinse the Aeropress clean. Except for a real espresso-based Americano, this is my favorite, quick, one-cup coffee maker.

- Donald Blum
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AlanAdler
Senior Member
AlanAdler
Joined: 31 Dec 2005
Posts: 711
Location: Palo Alto, Calif
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: AeroPress
Grinder: Baratza - Virtuoso
Roaster: Fresh Roast SR-500
Posted Tue Jan 17, 2006, 10:23pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

Hi Donald,

Want a real eye-opener?

Brew a cup with a French press.   Now filter that same brew through an AeroPress.  Remove the cap and look at the layer of sludge on the paper filter.   That layer of sludge was headed for your tummy!

You can read more about how I chose the AeroPress filtration method here:

"Re: French Press and Cholesterol"

Regards,

Alan
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verde
Senior Member
verde
Joined: 8 Feb 2005
Posts: 163
Location: Atlanta
Expertise: I love coffee

Grinder: Zass, Mazzer
Vac Pot: Cory, Kent, Vaculator
Drip: Melitta Clarity, Chemex
Roaster: Heatgun/BreadMachineBowl aka...
Posted Tue Jan 17, 2006, 10:49pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

Happyboy Said:

Does anyone know where to get these?   Anyone know of any eastern US distributors?

Posted December 14, 2005 link

A fan of kites, I got mine from Flags and Kites
Priority Mail is $6.45 to my address.
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Rawman
Senior Member
Rawman
Joined: 14 Jun 2003
Posts: 1,034
Location: SF Bay Area, CA
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: 2002 Cremina, Elektra MKAL,...
Grinder: Mazzer Mini
Vac Pot: Silex Vintage Vac Pot
Drip: Bodum chambord FP, Melitta...
Roaster: HotTop, Buzzroaster,  HG/DB
Posted Tue Jan 17, 2006, 11:19pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

Alan, still wondering about how much water to use in it for 2 scoops.

 
Rawman the Expobarbarian..
AKA the Original Jon R.
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Rawman
Senior Member
Rawman
Joined: 14 Jun 2003
Posts: 1,034
Location: SF Bay Area, CA
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: 2002 Cremina, Elektra MKAL,...
Grinder: Mazzer Mini
Vac Pot: Silex Vintage Vac Pot
Drip: Bodum chambord FP, Melitta...
Roaster: HotTop, Buzzroaster,  HG/DB
Posted Tue Jan 17, 2006, 11:22pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

dsharp88 Said:

Alan, you were right about the Melitta filters being the same as the ones you have included with the Aeropress. I tried the Melitta brand, which may have been even more pourous. I also tried Chemex filters, which are definitely thicker, but still got some drip through at regular coffee levels.

It seems that 23 g of coffee would equate to a stovetop moka pot type of brew - strong enough for lattes to be sure - and it cuts down the drip through. I also agree that true 9 bar espresso doesn't require much crema be formed and can still be excellent, but true 9 bar pressure is required to release the insolubles in ground coffee that give the richness to the real thing.

So what we're getting out of 23 g of coffee is a good strong base that can work with milk drinks, but is only releasing the solubles (the water-based product) in the coffee. As caffeine is water-soluble based, that likely means decent punch but not so overwhelming in just 15 or so seconds so ruk, who wasn't sure if it would produce a kicka** coffee, truly has nothing to worry about.  It's certainly also much different than a french press as this doesn't leave any sludge in the bottom of the cup.

The rest of this post is all personal preference. I like a longer total immersion and the SCAA standards of coffee regarding amount and temperature for full complexity, so I have found an extremely easy workaround. I put the medium-ground coffee (12-13g) in in a stainless steel steaming pitcher (great funnel, by the way!), add 7 ounces of 200 degree water, give a quick stir (great stirring rod, too, Alan!) and let the immersion happen. The steel holds the heat better than the glass of a french press, but you can also use that or any other good, heat-retaining container.  I recommend keeping it covered during the immersion/extraction phase to retain even more of the heat. After three minutes of immersing a medium grind, the full extraction has taken place.

I pour it all into the Aeropress and plunge immediately. This allows for the full flavor of a french press coffee while being much cleaner. It's much richer than a filter-cone drip (which doesn't allow total immersion time of the grinds), and is extremely easy to clean up. It literally takes two seconds to rinse the Aeropress clean. Except for a real espresso-based Americano, this is my favorite, quick, one-cup coffee maker.

- Donald Blum

Posted January 17, 2006 link

Thanks, I'll be trying this tomorrow!

 
Rawman the Expobarbarian..
AKA the Original Jon R.
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AlanAdler
Senior Member
AlanAdler
Joined: 31 Dec 2005
Posts: 711
Location: Palo Alto, Calif
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: AeroPress
Grinder: Baratza - Virtuoso
Roaster: Fresh Roast SR-500
Posted Tue Jan 17, 2006, 11:41pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

Hello rawman,

There are measuring guides printed on the side of the AeroPress chamber.   For two scoops you have the following choices.

Fill to the center of the oval marked "2" for a hearty espresso.   This is about 80cc of water and will yield a Brix of about 7.5 which is my preference for a straight espresso.  

Fill to the top of the same oval for an espresso about as strong as Starbucks serves.  This is about 120cc of water and yields a Brix of about 5.   This is also a good fill point if you plan to dillute it to an Americano.

Fill to the bottom of the same oval if you want a very intense espesso.  You can drink it straight, or mix it into a latte.   This is about 50cc water and yields a Brix of about 9 or 10.

The side of the plunger carries the same markings.   This is handy if you want to use the plunger as a vessel for heating in the microwave, or with an immersion heater.

Of course, you can fill to any point that suits your taste buds.  It's entirely your call.

You can read more about the Brix method of measuring coffee strength here:

"Measuring Coffee Strength With A Brix Meter"

Regards,

Alan
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JPR
Senior Member


Joined: 29 Dec 2005
Posts: 13
Location: New Jersey
Expertise: I live coffee

Posted Thu Jan 19, 2006, 12:20pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

I think the flavor profile of a diluted aeropress is very different from a french press. To me it tastes much more like an Americano. This is with the full recommended amount of grounds but a somewhat higher temp.

Regarding milk drinks - it's not that the aeropress brew is bland, it simply lacks brightness. Most of the other flvors are still there.  I haven't tried in a milk drink. It certainly makes a cup that is concentrated enough for such drinks, but I think it might be overly smooth for some people. If the reason you like milk drinks is that you like your coffee smoothed out, then this will make a great drink.

You can also use beans that are maybe more "robust" in flavor then you would normally drink. These may come out about right for an espresso-like profile and give a better milk frink.
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AlanAdler
Senior Member
AlanAdler
Joined: 31 Dec 2005
Posts: 711
Location: Palo Alto, Calif
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: AeroPress
Grinder: Baratza - Virtuoso
Roaster: Fresh Roast SR-500
Posted Fri Jan 20, 2006, 1:28pm
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

Hi JPR,

I agree with you that diluted AeroPress coffee tastes more like an Americano.   To me it's a cleaner, sweeter taste than French press brew.

Regarding "brightness", that's what I call "edge".   Have you tried hotter water?   My experience has been that the hotter the water, the "brighter" the brew.   Try 185F or even more if necessary.

Incidentally, it's worth dipping your thermometer in boiling (bubbling) water to check it.  I find that kitchen thermometers can be as much as 30 degrees off of 212F.

Regards,

Alan
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jehallahan
Senior Member
jehallahan
Joined: 21 Jan 2006
Posts: 3
Location: Iraq
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Gaggia Espresso
Grinder: Generic Blade Grinder- I...
Drip: Krups Fresh Aroma Grind &...
Posted Sat Jan 21, 2006, 6:59am
Subject: Re: Aerobie Aeropress
 

Just wanted to put my 2 cents in to the discussion. I have been following this thread since I learned about the Aeropress on digg and I have been encouraged to read your individual comments on the form, function and use of this product.  Your combined input prompted me to purchase one.  I am a soldier deployed in Iraq currently and the ability to have a device that is both portable as well as capable of producing a cup of coffee of superior quality is a godsend! I am awaiting shipment now. As you might imagine, it takes some time for mail to get to us here regardless of where its coming from so I continue to read your comments and envy your ability to enjoy coffee that doesnt resemble motor oil in both consistancy and taste.  I would also like to thank Mr. Adler for contributing his time and experiance with his product to this forum.  There are few who do more in our market place than mass produce a product and sell and forget it.  You show a genuine interest in not justhow well your product does in the market but how well the consumer recieves it, which seems to be very well. I'll try to update on my experiances with the Aeropress when I get it, however my access to anything but preground generic drip coffee is quite limited.

SSG James Hallahan
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