Our Valued Sponsor
OpinionsConsumer ReviewsGuides and How TosCoffeeGeek ReviewsResourcesForums
Coffee: Home Roasting Talk
blends and identifying the cracks?
Support Coffee Kids
Coffee Kids is a non profit charity working with farming communities around the world. Donate today!
www.coffeekids.org
 
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered  
Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Discussions > Coffee > Home Roast > blends and...  
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Author Messages
dagoat
Senior Member


Joined: 10 Dec 2004
Posts: 320
Location: santa barbara, ca
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: La Pavoni Europiccola, BDB...
Grinder: baratza vario
Vac Pot: aeropress
Drip: manual
Roaster: cafe rosto
Posted Wed Apr 17, 2013, 10:14pm
Subject: blends and identifying the cracks?
 

how do people identify first and second crack when roasting a blend?  today, i roasted my first SO.  prior to this, i had only bought SO's pre-roasted by reputable experts with a roasted on date, and most of my home-roasting was done with sweet marias blends.  and with the blends, i always had much trouble positively ID'ing the cracks.  i thought it was due to the loud noise of my cafe rosto air bed roaster.  but today, roasting my first ever SO, it was a dream.  easy as pie to hear the cracks.  ultimately i'm not surprised.  

but it does beg the question, how do people positively id the cracks when roasting a blend?  or do they, do it at all?  is roasting a blend more of a hit-or-miss proposition?

-peter
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
NobbyR
Senior Member
NobbyR
Joined: 10 Jul 2011
Posts: 2,041
Location: Germany
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Poccino Opus One, Ariete
Grinder: Eureka Mignon Istantaneo
Vac Pot: N/A
Drip: Melitta Linea Unica de Luxe
Roaster: N/A
Posted Wed Apr 17, 2013, 10:51pm
Subject: Re: blends and identifying the cracks?
 

Although it can be done the other way around, it's usually roast first, blend later, because different green beans require different roasting profiles. Like you experienced yourself it's easy to identify the first crack, when rasting SO coffee. Rosting a blend makes it difficult, because each bean has a different timing.

 
***
"This drink of the Satan is so delicious that it would be a shame to leave it to the infidels." (Pope Clement VIII on coffee, when he was urged to ban the beverage)
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
dagoat
Senior Member


Joined: 10 Dec 2004
Posts: 320
Location: santa barbara, ca
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: La Pavoni Europiccola, BDB...
Grinder: baratza vario
Vac Pot: aeropress
Drip: manual
Roaster: cafe rosto
Posted Thu Apr 18, 2013, 7:41am
Subject: Re: blends and identifying the cracks?
 

NobbyR Said:

Although it can be done the other way around, it's usually roast first, blend later, because different green beans require different roasting profiles. Like you experienced yourself it's easy to identify the first crack, when rasting SO coffee. Rosting a blend makes it difficult, because each bean has a different timing.

Posted April 17, 2013 link

makes perfect sense if you are blending your own.  but sweet maria's blends are sold green and already mixed.  iirc there's a thread over on hb about sweet maria's espresso monkey blend.  i suppose i should give it a read.  maybe there are some roasting tips in that article?

-peter
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
NobbyR
Senior Member
NobbyR
Joined: 10 Jul 2011
Posts: 2,041
Location: Germany
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Poccino Opus One, Ariete
Grinder: Eureka Mignon Istantaneo
Vac Pot: N/A
Drip: Melitta Linea Unica de Luxe
Roaster: N/A
Posted Fri Apr 19, 2013, 1:02am
Subject: Re: blends and identifying the cracks?
 

Like I said it's common practice to roast a blend of green beans, but like I also explained it can have its shortcomings. I guess the major question is how satisfied you are with the taste of Sweet Maria's blend in the cup, because that's what really counts in the end.

 
***
"This drink of the Satan is so delicious that it would be a shame to leave it to the infidels." (Pope Clement VIII on coffee, when he was urged to ban the beverage)
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
BarryR
Senior Member


Joined: 21 Nov 2010
Posts: 278
Location: Wilbraham
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: CC1
Grinder: Baratza Preciso
Drip: Behmor Brazen, Clever...
Roaster: Hottop KN-8828B2-K
Posted Sat May 11, 2013, 7:01am
Subject: Re: blends and identifying the cracks?
 

I've been very impressed with most of the SM blends including Monkey and Donkey.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
muzak
Senior Member
muzak
Joined: 15 Jun 2007
Posts: 48
Location: Stillwater Cove California
Expertise: Pro Roaster

Espresso: FrancisFrancis X3
Grinder: Olympia Garanzia
Vac Pot: Bodum French Press 32oz
Roaster: Sonofresco, Gene Cafe
Posted Sat May 11, 2013, 10:58am
Subject: Re: blends and identifying the cracks?
 

dagoat Said:

how do people identify first and second crack when roasting a blend? i thought it was due to the loud noise of my cafe rosto air bed roaster.  but today, roasting my first ever SO, it was a dream.  easy as pie to hear the cracks.  ultimately i'm not surprised.  

but it does beg the question, how do people positively id the cracks when roasting a blend?  or do they, do it at all?  is roasting a blend more of a hit-or-miss proposition?

Posted April 17, 2013 link

I frequently roast blends for espresso in my Sonofresco. First crack should be identifiable with a number of different factors, by 400F in actual bean temp the first crack is underway in just about all coffee. What that translates to in roasters temp will vary, i know for Gene Cafe that's about 315-335, about 340-350 in the Sonofresco. You also want to look for chaff, as that is one actual physical change going on with the bean. Even if the beans don't crack at the exact same time there will be noticeable chaff.  

The most major difference i find in the beans is due to age, the older the bean the slower it is to roast. I will purposely blend an older bean that i want to stay lighter with a newer bean that will go darker. In that case i will base the roast off the darker bean and generally take it 30sec or so past the first crack to FC for espresso.
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Discussions > Coffee > Home Roast > blends and...  
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered     Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
Discussions Quick Jump:
Symbols: New Posts= New Posts since your last visit      No New Posts= No New Posts since last visit     Go to most recent post= Newest post
Forum Rules:
No profanity, illegal acts or personal attacks will be tolerated in these discussion boards.
No commercial posting of any nature will be tolerated; only private sales by private individuals, in the "Buy and Sell" forum.
No SEO style postings will be tolerated. SEO related posts will result in immediate ban from CoffeeGeek.
No cross posting allowed - do not post your topic to more than one forum, nor repost a topic to the same forum.
Who Can Read The Forum? Anyone can read posts in these discussion boards.
Who Can Post New Topics? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post new topics.
Who Can Post Replies? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post replies.
Can Photos be posted? Anyone can post photos in their new topics or replies.
Who can change or delete posts? Any CoffeeGeek member can edit their own posts. Only moderators can delete posts.
Probationary Period: If you are a new signup for CoffeeGeek, you cannot promote, endorse, criticise or otherwise post an unsolicited endorsement for any company, product or service in your first five postings.
Rancilio Silvia - How to
Step by step guide for easy brewing and steaming with the Rancilio Silvia
www.seattlecoffeegear.com
Home | Opinions | Consumer Reviews | Guides & How Tos | CoffeeGeek Reviews | Resources | Forums | Contact Us
CoffeeGeek.com, CoffeeGeek, and Coffee Geek, along with all associated content & images are copyright ©2000-2014 by Mark Prince, all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Content, code, and images may not be reused without permission. Usage of this website signifies agreement with our Terms and Conditions. (0.288058996201)
Privacy Policy | Copyright Info | Terms and Conditions | CoffeeGeek Advertisers | RSS | Find us on Google+