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Okay, what is wrong here?
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Discussions > Coffee > Home Roast > Okay, what is...  
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jeffnet
Senior Member


Joined: 26 Jan 2008
Posts: 12
Location: Oregon
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: Maestro Plus
Roaster: Freshroast+8
Posted Fri Feb 15, 2008, 12:25am
Subject: Okay, what is wrong here?
 

I just upgraded from a freshroast8 to an iroast2.  I have used the iroast2 four times now.  I have tried 130g and 150g of beans per roast.  The profiles I programed are

350 3min
400 2 min
440  until done (to FC)

and I have tried

325 2 min
350 2 min
400 2 min
440 til done (to FC)

I have roasted Columbian, Indian, Panama and Kona (an expensive mistake).  Typically I hit first crack at about 5 min with either profile.  Then, the coffee seems to "take off"  Just as it gets to the end of first crack is starts getting really dark, looking like it is at FC or FC+ by six minutes.  The first time this happened i let the roast go on thinking that it just looked dark, but would not be FC unitl it hit second crack.  By the first snap of second crack the coffee looked like Petes french roast... very dark and oily.  The other times used the Roaster, it did the same thing and I hit cool at about 6 min into the roast.  I got coffee that looked like FC but never made it close to second crack.  All this talk about roasting times of 8 minutes or more has me baffled.  What is going on?  What should I try to get a longer roast, or at least get to second crack without creating charcol beans.

I am roasting in my kitchen and the house is usually at about 70 degrees.  Regular house 110 plug.  An ideas / suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Jeff
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Egholm
Senior Member


Joined: 24 Oct 2007
Posts: 55
Location: Denmark
Expertise: I love coffee

Roaster: iRoast2
Posted Fri Feb 15, 2008, 2:48am
Subject: Re: Okay, what is wrong here?
 

jeffnet Said:

I just upgraded from a freshroast8 to an iroast2.

Posted February 15, 2008 link

--- 8< 8< 8< ---

jeffnet Said:

Typically I hit first crack at about 5 min with either profile.

Posted February 15, 2008 link

--- 8< 8< 8< ---

jeffnet Said:

I am roasting in my kitchen and the house is usually at about 70 degrees.  Regular house 110 plug.  An ideas / suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Posted February 15, 2008 link

You need to mod it! It's a well known fact that these machines are running hot - iBurn2.
Look here - it's all here:iBurn resistor mod.
I have installed a potentiometer so that I could find the "optimal" resistor value - right now it's at 3k3...

BR,
Egholm
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wideasleep1
Senior Member
wideasleep1
Joined: 19 Feb 2005
Posts: 1,606
Location: Tiburon,Ca
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: VBMDoubleDomo
Grinder: Mahlkoenig K30 Vario
Vac Pot: nope
Drip: AeroPresses FTW!
Roaster: IR1 and 2,SC/TO,Behmor
Posted Fri Feb 15, 2008, 11:03pm
Subject: Re: Okay, what is wrong here?
 

My R2 ran significantly hotter than my R1, as they messed with the fan speeds, and slowed it down (more heat) coupled with the fact that the bean mass was less mobile, and rode a fast curve into 2C+ in a hurry if you looked away for an instant. I ended up reducing the the amount by about 15%, and watching it carefully. I stretched out 1C->2C as much as I could while still fitting in the allotted time, and I wanted a fast heatup initially...my best luck was what I call my 3-4-5:
3 mins @ 480 (never really got there, just went full-on for 3 mins)
4 mins @ 380 (although some beans req'd more or less to reach 1C)
5 mins @ finish temp (usually around 430-50, again, by bean requirement)
On R2, I had to kill the roast easily a minute sooner than on my R1.

Give that profile a try, and tweak it to fit your needs. G'Luck!
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jeffnet
Senior Member


Joined: 26 Jan 2008
Posts: 12
Location: Oregon
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: Maestro Plus
Roaster: Freshroast+8
Posted Sat Feb 16, 2008, 5:30am
Subject: Re: Okay, what is wrong here?
 

thanks for the suggestion.   Why the fast heat up?  I had assumed that starting with a lower temp. like 325 for five minutes, would be better.  So, what is the difference between starting at low or starting at high heat?

Jeff
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wideasleep1
Senior Member
wideasleep1
Joined: 19 Feb 2005
Posts: 1,606
Location: Tiburon,Ca
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: VBMDoubleDomo
Grinder: Mahlkoenig K30 Vario
Vac Pot: nope
Drip: AeroPresses FTW!
Roaster: IR1 and 2,SC/TO,Behmor
Posted Sat Feb 16, 2008, 2:49pm
Subject: Re: Okay, what is wrong here?
 

jeffnet Said:

thanks for the suggestion.   Why the fast heat up?  I had assumed that starting with a lower temp. like 325 for five minutes, would be better.  So, what is the difference between starting at low or starting at high heat?

Jeff

Posted February 16, 2008 link

It's difficult to make generalizations, as we're dealing with a specific roast platform in the iRoast2, and the same profiles may and often do not apply to other platforms. It was my experience that a fast start ensured I had sufficient time, as determined by total roast duration limited by IR2, to reach 2C with ample time to dial in a specific degree of roast. I tend to roast dark, just into 2C and just beyond. Any chance to extend 1C->2C (flavor delevlopment) in that small chamber of hot air is best done if one can get the mass to creep into 1C earlier in the profile, rather than later, where there's a greater chance to end with a baked load, or poor overall flavor development. One thing you could do is test a load by sending a single ramp to 450 for 12 minutes, and note the times 1C, 2C, and French happen, then begin stretching 1C->2C in creating ways. I doubt you'd find a slow ramp to 1C is beneficial, ultimately. :)
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Dr_Cherry
Senior Member


Joined: 16 Feb 2008
Posts: 2
Location: Hamtramck, MI
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Sat Feb 16, 2008, 8:42pm
Subject: Re: Okay, what is wrong here?
 

We've had our i-Roast 2 just under two weeks and thought I'd share our findings with the class.  We used Sweet Maria's suggested settings for a starting point:

350 @ 2:00
400 @ 3:00
460 @ 4:30

We roasted just under a cup and completely obliterated the first two batches well inside five minutes.  They went from cracking to burned in what seemed like seconds.

We read that our local power supply has an effect on the performance of the machine.  Since we have 200 amp service in the city and run the unit on a 20 amp circuit with nothing else, we figure we need to dial the temps down.

Finally we got down to:

320 @ 2:00
360 @ 3:00
410 @ 4:30

The coffee was hitting first crack right around five minutes (several different varieties).  We felt it was getting to target temps quickly and just stalling there and getting hot / smoking extremely fast so we finally added another phase.  We call this curve #6:

330 @ 2:00
350 @ 2:00
3:80 @ 2:00
410 @ 3:30

We're getting the first crack after the five-minute mark now and the temp adjustments prolong it.  We've also managed to delay the second crack until 1:30 into the last phase which give us more time to decide how long we want to let the last one go.

Today we roasted an Organic Sumatran and stopped it with about 1:30 to go in the last phase.  It's a good nice Full City roast, stopped just after the second crack.

Finally, the internal temps taken by the machine are only 10-20 degrees lower than the programmed temps.  I think depending on your power supply, your results will vary.
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steamer
Senior Member
steamer
Joined: 11 Feb 2005
Posts: 903
Location: socal
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Expobar Brewtus IV R
Grinder: Mazzer Mini-B Baratza...
Vac Pot: Krubs Moka Brew, vacPot
Drip: TechV, and many more
Roaster: Hottop
Posted Sun Feb 17, 2008, 5:43am
Subject: Re: Okay, what is wrong here?
 

1st rule is to keep a log of results of every origin, Kona will not roast with the same settings as Java, Every bean will be different so your temp would need adjusting. I used to start all roasts at 350 and build from there.
A Kona would look like this:
4@350
3@400
2.5@425
2@450 or till just at 2nd crack

I base my times on time setting, like 11.5 minutes (above)
Or 12 minutes, also a 10 minutes.
Then I would keep those settings as 1,2,3,4...
Then set each orgin to those times, worked pretty well, but you need to log and nothing wrong to using all five stages.
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jeffnet
Senior Member


Joined: 26 Jan 2008
Posts: 12
Location: Oregon
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: Maestro Plus
Roaster: Freshroast+8
Posted Sun Feb 17, 2008, 10:44am
Subject: Re: Okay, what is wrong here?
 

so, if I do what you post  for Kona

4@450
3@400
2.5@425
2@450


I hit FC in about 5 minutes... then the thing just "takes off" and within a minute it get really dark and begins SC.  It looks darker than it should when entering SC. (batch size 150g, and it gets dark and oily fast).  That is why I think the machine is just going way to hot even though the onboard temp appears below the programed temp.  I have tried almost a dozen differnt profiles, (some with low starting temps and some with high) half a dozen different coffees, a varied batch size from 100g to 150g, and no matter what, I get FC at about 5min and then very soon after that the beans get very dark and they look like Full City or Full City+ at about 6 minues.  Sometimes I clearly hear the beginning of SC and sometimes not.  Doesn't matter cuz the beans are too dark to continue without burning them up. Anything beyond 6 minutes takes the beans way too dark.  Maybe something is wrong with the machine itself?  (I live in a normal residential neighborhood in a house with a typcial 110 outlet.  The house is only 11 years old so wiring should be fine).  Using the same outlet with my FR+8 I get to SC in about 6 mintues.  I wanted the iroast2 to be able to extend the roast times.  Should I just try to exchange the machine?
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Steve_G
Senior Member


Joined: 28 Apr 2007
Posts: 117
Location: Arizona, USA
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: Cuisinart
Drip: Mr Coffee
Roaster: I Roast 2
Posted Sun Feb 17, 2008, 1:48pm
Subject: Re: Okay, what is wrong here?
 

Do the resistor mod before you wear yourself out with profiles and voltages and ambient temps. Once done, your IR2 will purr along (or roar along!) quite nicely in any environment, with nice results.
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jeffnet
Senior Member


Joined: 26 Jan 2008
Posts: 12
Location: Oregon
Expertise: I like coffee

Grinder: Maestro Plus
Roaster: Freshroast+8
Posted Sun Feb 17, 2008, 11:18pm
Subject: Re: Okay, what is wrong here?
 

so I want to do the resistor mod on the iroast 2 and I have read the posts about how to do it but still have questions.   I took the bottom of the Iroast2 off and was able to pull out the connector piece with the resistor in it.  The question is then what?  can i pull  the resistor out of the connector and then push in a new resistor?  or do I have to get a new connector and a new resister, make sure the new connector fits the exisitng one, and put the new one in.  Does the new resistor simply push into the new connector?

Where can I buy the connector and the resistor?  a previous post indicated the type of connector, XHP-3... as far as the resistor goes I just ask for a 1.87ohm resistor or do I need other info like wattage?  or any other identifiying info.

Any more detailed instructions would be appreciated on doing this mod.  I have no electronics background, so pretend I you are explaining the process to a 1st grader :)   thanks.  

If anyone has an XHP-3 connector with a resistor installed that is between 1.8ohm and 2.1ohm, I am more than willing to purchase it from you.  thanks.
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