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What is a Latte and what is a capacino?
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Discussions > Coffee > General > What is a Latte...  
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Comforse
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Comforse
Joined: 20 Mar 2014
Posts: 2
Location: Canada
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Thu Mar 20, 2014, 1:43pm
Subject: What is a Latte and what is a capacino?
 

I'm sort of new to the coffee world.   What is a Latte and what is a cappuccino?   I love the Tim Horton's French Vanilla Cappuccino.   Someone told me that it was really a latte?   What would I require to make a equivalent French Vanilla at home?
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TheRealScubaSteve
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TheRealScubaSteve
Joined: 22 Feb 2014
Posts: 97
Location: Massachusetts
Expertise: Just starting

Espresso: Delonghi EC155
Grinder: Baratza Encore
Posted Thu Mar 20, 2014, 9:00pm
Subject: Re: What is a Latte and what is a capacino?
 

A cappucino is 1/3 espresso, 1/3 steamed milk, and 1/3 foam.

A latte is a shot(s) of espresso and steamed milk.

Instant mixes are nothing more than instant coffee, powdered milk, and flavoring. In that sense, it really isn't a latte either, but flavored instant coffee. To make either a latte or a cappuccino, you'll need an espresso machine, the ability to steam/froth milk, and french vanilla syrup/flavoring if that's what you're looking to replicate.

 
"But it is not a perfect world and none of us are god-shots.  As for me, I am a little over extracted and therefore slightly bitter and my crema is thin..." -Buckley
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Comforse
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Comforse
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Location: Canada
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Mon Mar 24, 2014, 9:32am
Subject: Re: What is a Latte and what is a capacino?
 

Thanks!  So I need an expresso machine, so I can create froth, and a good French Vanilla recipe.  Can I use Almond/soymilk instead of regular?
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TheRealScubaSteve
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TheRealScubaSteve
Joined: 22 Feb 2014
Posts: 97
Location: Massachusetts
Expertise: Just starting

Espresso: Delonghi EC155
Grinder: Baratza Encore
Posted Mon Mar 24, 2014, 2:33pm
Subject: Re: What is a Latte and what is a capacino?
 

There are stand alone milk frothers, but an espresso machine would be best to make an authentic latte or cappuccino. Freshly roasted beans are an important part of making espresso in addition to a good grinder. Not as important, I suppose, since you'll essentially be masking the true coffee flavor, but you'll see a boost in taste nonetheless.

You can use any milk that you like so long as you like the taste, but certain milks froth better than others. I'm sure there are plenty of recipes online. Torani, DaVinci, and Monin are the big flavored syrup makers.

 
"But it is not a perfect world and none of us are god-shots.  As for me, I am a little over extracted and therefore slightly bitter and my crema is thin..." -Buckley
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boar_d_laze
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Espresso: La Cimbali M21 DT/1 Junior...
Grinder: Ceado E92; "Bunnzilla"
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Drip: Chemex + Kone; Espro Press
Roaster: USRC Sample Roaster
Posted Mon Mar 24, 2014, 10:26pm
Subject: Re: What is a Latte and what is a capacino?
 

The Tim Horton stuff is neither cappuccino nor latte.  It's a flavored instant coffee mix, and there's a world of difference between it and them.  Your taste is yours; and if you prefer the Tim Horton style of drink to more traditional, "real" drinks, there's nothing wrong with that.  

Even entry-level equipment isn't cheap and there's a lot of practice necessary to develop the skills to make cafe quality drinks. Before investing in espresso equipment, go to a good cafe (many aren't very good at all), try freshly crafted cappuccinos and lattes, and see what you think.  

Rich
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Buckley
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Joined: 25 Jan 2011
Posts: 423
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Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Tue Mar 25, 2014, 3:31am
Subject: Re: What is a Latte and what is a capacino?
 

You can make your own pretty cheaply if you like the taste of Tim Hortons.  This is not a put-down, I respect your determination to search out what you enjoy.  To approach the richness of a shot of espresso you can buy an Aeropress or a mokapot.  Search these out on this forum or Google them.  You can make a passable milk froth with an inexpensive milk-frothing wand from Ikea - heat the milk slightly first.  If you think that strong coffee (or to your liking) will do the trick, then consider buying a french press.  As we say all over this forum, the key to making really good coffee or espresso is to freshly grind good quality beans.  "Freshly grind' means to grind what you need and use it within 15 minutes - not 'bring the beans home, grind them all up and put them in a jar'.  For what you want, you can probably get away with buying good quality groound coffee for your set-up (aeropress, mokapot, FP) but most of us would consider that the taste goes stale shortly after opening the bag or can.  Each set-up requires its own coarseness/fineness of grind - you will have to experiment with that.  You may notice the flavor falling off after several days if you go the pre-ground route.  As your demands for taste evolve, you make want to buy a good quality coffee grinder to go with your coffee or moka maker.  A good entry grinder will cost about US$200 and up - more than your brewer but it will be the key to better tasting coffee at home.  Then you can add your milk, french vanilla, whatever you like.  Grinder discussions are plentiful all over this forum.  Please do not waste your money on buying a US$100-120 'Krups', 'Mr. Coffee' or other cheap, designer grinder and certainly stay away from whirley blade chopper grinders, only get a burr grinder.
Good luck,
B
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