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dman777
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Posted Sun Jan 8, 2012, 12:46am
Subject: Kona Coffee- Beans Supposed be Dry?
 

Hi,

I just got my Kona coffee in from Smiths Farms in Hawaii. It's a very good company and it was very pleasurable to buy coffee from them.

I have a question, I am thrown off by the coffee bean appearance. I am new so I don't know. I just finished my Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee bag. The Blue Mountain Coffee beans were dark and very oily....which I liked alot. The Kona Coffee I got the beans are a lighter brown color, and there is hardly any oil that I find on them...their appearance is very dry(at least compared to the blue mountain coffee). Is this a trait of Kona beans?
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NobbyR
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Posted Sun Jan 8, 2012, 3:23am
Subject: Re: Kona Coffee- Beans Supposed be Dry?
 

It's a result of the different roast. The darker the roast the oilier the beans get.

There are many roasts:
  • Cinnamon Roast: The lightest drinkable roast, immediately before first crack with light brown, toasted grain flavors and sharp acidic tones.
  • New England Roast: Moderate light brown, still acidic but not bready (traditional roast for Northeastern U.S.), coffee, at first crack.
  • American Roast: Medium light brown (traditional roast for the Eastern U.S.) at first crack ending.
  • City Roast: Medium brown (the norm for most of the U.S.), good for tasting the specific character of a coffee bean.
  • Full City Roast: Medium dark brown beans with occasional oily sheen, good for varietal character and bittersweet flavors; at the beginning of second crack.
  • Vienna Roast: Moderate dark brown (traditional Austrian roast) with light surface oil, more bittersweet, caramely flavor, acidity muted; in the middle of second crack, occasionally used for espresso blends.
  • French Roast: Dark brown, oily beans with burnt undertones, acidity diminished; at the end of second crack, a popular roast for traditional espresso blends.
  • Italian Roast: Very dark brown and shiny, burnt tones become more distinct, acidity almost gone, thin body; the common roast for traditional Italian espresso blends.
  • Spanish Roast: Extremely dark brown, nearly black and very shiny, charcoal and tar tones dominate, flat, with thin body. For the traditional Spanisch Torrefacto sugar is added during the roasting process.

In this line the roasting temperature and time rise with every step.

 
***
"This drink of the Satan is so delicious that it would be a shame to leave it to the infidels." (Pope Clement VIII on coffee, when he was urged to ban the beverage)
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JPDyson
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Posted Sun Jan 8, 2012, 9:02am
Subject: Re: Kona Coffee- Beans Supposed be Dry?
 

Oil is a factor of roast level and time. Even lighter roasts can produce oil after long enough. However, darker roasts produce them quicker. So, the oil is usually a sign of either dark or aging coffee. Neither are my preference, so I frown when I see oil.

 
--Josh
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steamer
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Posted Mon Jan 9, 2012, 1:52pm
Subject: Re: Kona Coffee- Beans Supposed be Dry?
 

I roast my JBM normal beans the same as my normal Kona/Maui, normal meaning bean size. JBM peaberry and Kona/Maui pearberry will be darker in the roast. My Kona and JBM I dont take that dark, dump them at or before 2nd crack.
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LavaRock
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Posted Tue Jan 10, 2012, 4:11pm
Subject: Re: Kona Coffee- Beans Supposed be Dry?
 

I try not to have Kona roasted too dark (oily) because the darker you roast, the more charcoal the taste. I like to be able to experience the nuances of a coffee.
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konacoffeefarmer
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konacoffeefarmer
Joined: 31 May 2008
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Location: Kealakekua
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Posted Tue Jan 10, 2012, 6:46pm
Subject: Re: Kona Coffee- Beans Supposed be Dry?
 

...their appearance is very dry... Is this a trait of Kona beans?

Wrong question, my friend! The longer the roast, the darker and oilier the beans get. The aromatic oils are still contained within the beans at a medium roast level, and the fruit sugars have not yet caramelized. You ordered a medium roast with your Kona from Smith Farms: This roast shows the true quality of the Kona aroma, while the darker the roast the more evtl. faults are covered up. Any specific regional taste profile becomes a tad more generic. But if you are a dark roast fan, order dark roasts--who's to judge but you?

We remind our first time customers that the medium roasts beans appearance doesn't mean that they are old and stale. Also that they are smaller than the dark roast beans, as the roasting process lets beans swell up causing the bags of different roasts look unevenly filled.

In a nut shell, you got one of the best Konas around there! Enjoy!
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Lespauldude
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Lespauldude
Joined: 28 Feb 2013
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Location: Long Island, NY
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Thu Feb 28, 2013, 4:37pm
Subject: Re: Kona Coffee- Beans Supposed be Dry?
 

dman777 Said:

Hi,

I just got my Kona coffee in from Smiths Farms in Hawaii. It's a very good company and it was very pleasurable to buy coffee from them.

I have a question, I am thrown off by the coffee bean appearance. I am new so I don't know. I just finished my Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee bag. The Blue Mountain Coffee beans were dark and very oily....which I liked alot. The Kona Coffee I got the beans are a lighter brown color, and there is hardly any oil that I find on them...their appearance is very dry(at least compared to the blue mountain coffee). Is this a trait of Kona beans?

Posted January 8, 2012 link

Just opened up one of 2 one lb. bags from Smith Farms myself and noticed the same. I had spoken to Cecilia (Cea) Smith about her roasting method and she stated that it's a medium roast just before second crack. Looking forward to tasting a coffee that many have commented favorably about. Cea and Bob (and pets) have quite a nice little plantation going for sure. I'm contemplating doing my own roasting eventually. Between forced-air and rotating drum methods, what would be the preferred method? I understand that forced-air roasting happens quicker therefore you may not have much time to get it to exactly where you want it. Any suggestions? I appreciate any advise. Thanks!

Scott
Long Island, NY
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deleted
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Joined: 11 Jun 2014
Posts: 198
Expertise:

Posted Mon Jul 1, 2013, 11:54pm
Subject: Re: Kona Coffee- Beans Supposed be Dry?
 

NobbyR Said:

It's a result of the different roast. The darker the roast the oilier the beans get.

There are many roasts:
Cinnamon Roast: The lightest drinkable roast, immediately before first crack with light brown, toasted grain flavors and sharp acidic tones.
New England Roast: Moderate light brown, still acidic but not bready (traditional roast for Northeastern U.S.), coffee, at first crack.
American Roast: Medium light brown (traditional roast for the Eastern U.S.) at first crack ending.
City Roast: Medium brown (the norm for most of the U.S.), good for tasting the specific character of a coffee bean.
Full City Roast: Medium dark brown beans with occasional oily sheen, good for varietal character and bittersweet flavors; at the beginning of second crack.

Posted January 8, 2012 link

Vienna Roast: Moderate dark brown (traditional Austrian roast) with light surface oil, more bittersweet, caramely flavor, acidity muted; in the middle of second crack, occasionally used for espresso blends.
French Roast: Dark brown, oily beans with burnt undertones, acidity diminished; at the end of second crack, a popular roast for traditional espresso blends.
Italian Roast: Very dark brown and shiny, burnt tones become more distinct, acidity almost gone, thin body; the common roast for traditional Italian espresso blends.
Spanish Roast: Extremely dark brown, nearly black and very shiny, charcoal and tar tones dominate, flat, with thin body. For the traditional Spanisch Torrefacto sugar is added during the roasting process.

In this line the roasting temperature and time rise with every step.

Thanks NobbyR for providing the answer....
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deleted
Senior Member


Joined: 11 Jun 2014
Posts: 198
Expertise:

Posted Mon Jul 1, 2013, 11:55pm
Subject: Re: Kona Coffee- Beans Supposed be Dry?
 

Moderate dark brown (traditional Austrian roast) with light surface oil, more bittersweet, caramely flavor, acidity muted; in the middle of second crack, occasionally used for espresso blends.
French Roast: Dark brown, oily beans with burnt undertones, acidity diminished; at the end of second crack, a popular roast for traditional espresso blends.
Italian Roast: Very dark brown and shiny, burnt tones become more distinct, acidity almost gone, thin body; the common roast for traditional Italian espresso blends.
Spanish Roast: Extremely dark brown, nearly black and very shiny, charcoal and tar tones dominate, flat, with thin body. For the traditional Spanisch Torrefacto sugar is added during the roasting process.

In this line the roasting temperature and time rise with every step.

Thanks NobbyR for providing the answer....
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