Our Valued Sponsor
OpinionsConsumer ReviewsGuides and How TosCoffeeGeek ReviewsResourcesForums
Articles: How-To Article Feedback
Brewing Turkish Coffee
Cafe Espresso Machines
Video reviews, nationwide installation, leasing options... Nuova Simonelli, Rancilio, La Marzocco.
www.seattlecoffeegear.com
 
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered  
Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Discussions > Articles > How-To Feedback > Brewing Turkish...  
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
showing page 3 of 18 first page | last page previous page | next page
Author Messages
MarkPrince
Moderator


Joined: 19 Dec 2001
Posts: 5,582
Location: Vancouver, BC
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: KvdW Speedster
Grinder: Compak K10 WBC
Vac Pot: A bit too many
Drip: Clive Coffee Drip Stand
Roaster: Hario Glass Retro Roaster
Posted Sat Nov 19, 2005, 2:10pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

the way I was taught, which could very well be wrong:

Eeee breeek.

Mark

 
CoffeeGeek Senior Editor
www.twitter.com/coffeegeek www.flickr.com/coffeegeek, www.instagram.com/coffeegeek (you get the picture)
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
dahlor
Senior Member
dahlor
Joined: 25 Aug 2005
Posts: 41
Location: USA (KC, MO area)
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Bezzera BZ02S
Grinder: Rancilio Rocky
Drip: coffee drinker says WHAT?
Roaster: Fresh Roast Plus 8
Posted Sun Nov 20, 2005, 7:53am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

Thanks Mark.  My vowels were way off.  My pronunciation had way more to do with personal possessiveness and terracotta building materials. :-)  So what about the scientific/artistic/chemistry lesson that we love to call an "in depth" look at the Turkish method?  Any possibilities of that happening?
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
chris_haake
Senior Member


Joined: 15 Jan 2005
Posts: 15
Location: Grand Forks, ND, USA
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Sun Nov 20, 2005, 12:00pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

Great article! I've been brewing Turkish coffee for about ten years now. An old friend used to own a Turkish import store (he's from Turkey), and he sold me the equipment and taught me how to brew it. It took a little practice, but eventually I was able to savor delicious Turkish coffee any time I wanted (usually after a large meal).

One thing I'll point out is this: in the article, it says to grind the coffee with a hand mill or a good burr mill. I've never seen a burr mill that could grind the beans finely enough. For Turkish coffee, the grounds need to be POWDER...that is, almost like talc. This will not only release the flavor properly, but the finest of the powder will suspend in the water and give Turkish coffee that heavy body that makes it so distinctive. Having extremely fine grounds also means that most of the powder will settle into a dense mat on the bottom of the cup, staying out of your mouth (provided you don't stir the cup). Most burr grinders are really only capable of going down to a fine expresso grind.

Gobs Said:

y future mother-in-law also said that in some areas in Europe that serve Turkish coffee, they give you a sweet soft cube sort of candy (not s sugar cube) to suck on. This softens the taste of your coffee without sugar or milk.

Gobs

Posted November 17, 2005 link

This is what we call "Turkish delight." I don't know what it's called in Europe of the Middle East. It's lightly flavored, sometimes with saffron. It's basically the same type of candy as those fruit-slice jellies one sees in candy shops...you know, the ones that look like slices of orange, water melon, and so forth, except that in my experience Turkish delight isn't as sweet. Cheers, everyone!
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
Gobs
Senior Member
Gobs
Joined: 5 Sep 2004
Posts: 41
Location: Hr
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Sun Nov 20, 2005, 4:27pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

chris_haake Said:

This is what we call "Turkish delight." I don't know what it's called in Europe of the Middle East. It's lightly flavored, sometimes with saffron. It's basically the same type of candy as those fruit-slice jellies one sees in candy shops...you know, the ones that look like slices of orange, water melon, and so forth, except that in my experience Turkish delight isn't as sweet. Cheers, everyone!

Posted November 20, 2005 link

That is exactly how it is although the one I tried was coated with a certain powerder similar to confectioner sugar so it is slightly sweetened. I too am not sure of the name but when I find out and have an available photo, I will post it. Although it's Turkish in origin, as all good things, it has spread around in neighboring countires and as far as I know, the one I tried was bought from Bosnia. But I think it may be available now in a local Slovinian operated mall.

I also find the grind of the coffee for the Ibrik to be very fine (powder fine) and stronger for that matter compared to the once I use on the espresso machine. I did try using the gounds in an espresso machine and the first shot as predicted had a lot of grounds on the cup but when 14g is used an tamped heavy, you get a significantly less amount of grounds. Not a bad shot but better left to be prepared on the Ibrik.


Gobs

 
"I never discovered anything with my rational mind."
- Albert Einstein
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
Rann
Senior Member


Joined: 29 Apr 2003
Posts: 12
Location: Tel Aviv, Israel
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: NS Oscar
Grinder: NS MCF
Posted Thu Nov 24, 2005, 6:59am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

That is exactly how it is although the one I tried was coated with a certain powerder similar to confectioner sugar so it is slightly sweetened. I too am not sure of the name but when I find out and have an available photo, I will post it. Although it's Turkish in origin, as all good things, it has spread around in neighboring countires and as far as I know, the one I tried was bought from Bosnia. But I think it may be available now in a local Slovinian operated mall.


If I'm not mistaken you're referring to "Lokum" (pronounced with the accent on the 2nd syllable). Here in Israel it's usually coated with sugar powder, sometimes with coconut flakes. As to Cofeer's earlier comments, I also learned from my mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, all from Bulgaria of Turkish descent, that it's only boiled twice, the trick is to form the froth during the first boil and then distribute it among the cups, and the quality of the cup is largely judged by the quality and consistency of the head. Unforunately I have yet to learn to do it right. The foam is called kaimak (at least in my family). It's s lovely way to enjoy coffee.

 
Rann
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
scooterboy
Senior Member
scooterboy
Joined: 24 Feb 2004
Posts: 251
Location: melbourne, australia
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: silvia no-mods; L7 plumbed
Grinder: mazzer mini-T; mini-E
Vac Pot: bialetti brika
Drip: braun electronic
Roaster: none yet; maybe one day
Posted Thu Nov 24, 2005, 3:51pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

Gobs Said:

The foam is called kaimak (at least in my family). It's s lovely way to enjoy coffee.

Posted November 20, 2005 link

Yeah, in my family (greek background) i know it to be called kaimaki and the sweets as loukoumi (but figuratively translated to turkish delight)

MarkPrince Said:

the way I was taught, which could very well be wrong:
Eeee breeek.
Mark

Posted November 19, 2005 link

Thanks Mark, for a minute there, i thought that the coffee pot was made by apple computer inc :)

i know this as a briki (which just translates to kettle).  i don't know why (at least in my family - if not most greek speakers that i know) they add the i to the end!  

regards

paris
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
dolcimelo
Senior Member


Joined: 15 Jan 2005
Posts: 139
Location: Nagano, Japan
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Elektra SXCD, Aero Press,...
Grinder: Mazzer Mini
Vac Pot: Cona B
Drip: Not since getting the tap...
Roaster: iRoast2
Posted Sat Nov 26, 2005, 6:05am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

Although Mark is sure right when he notes that there are very many ways to brew this kind of coffee, a Lebanese friend who sells Middle-Eastern foods (including coffee) has also pointed out an interesting fact. It is not actually necessary to boil the coffee at all, and he never does. The coffee will froth up before the water boils, if you heat it at the right rate, and this will also create more froth (usually, after three real boils, the froth will evaporate). How this affects the taste I'm not sure, but it can't be a bad thing. He also pointed out that some coffees do not taste well with sugar when made in this way, whereas others taste better sweetened, so it might be worth experimenting before deciding how you like it - certainly, adding sugar changes the taste remarkably. A couple of firm raps with a spoon on the side of the pot after brewing will also help settle the grinds before pouring, and I am told a few drops of cold water will do likewise. Really, too much is made of the grounds, which are not a problem, and are essential for fortune telling.

If you have trouble getting the froth into the cups, then try spooning a little into the bottom of each cup during the first two froth-ups (this might, however, be regarded like spooning milk froth onto the top of a cappuccino!).

One last and very interesting method (which my father told me was Syrian, but who knows?) is to slowly add hot (not boiling) water to the powdered coffee while whipping it with a spoon or other implement until it forms a very thick paste which is then diluted into a drink, but still very thick. I'd be interested to know if anyone has more details on this method. It almost sounds like a coffee version of Japanese matcha.

Matt
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
dahlor
Senior Member
dahlor
Joined: 25 Aug 2005
Posts: 41
Location: USA (KC, MO area)
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Bezzera BZ02S
Grinder: Rancilio Rocky
Drip: coffee drinker says WHAT?
Roaster: Fresh Roast Plus 8
Posted Sat Nov 26, 2005, 9:39am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

So, does anyone have any tips of preferences on the blend of bean used for this brewing method?  I know the stronger roasts get even stronger with different methods of brewiing, so what's a good place to start with the Turkish brew?
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
dolcimelo
Senior Member


Joined: 15 Jan 2005
Posts: 139
Location: Nagano, Japan
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Elektra SXCD, Aero Press,...
Grinder: Mazzer Mini
Vac Pot: Cona B
Drip: Not since getting the tap...
Roaster: iRoast2
Posted Sat Nov 26, 2005, 8:37pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

dahlor Said:

So, does anyone have any tips of preferences on the blend of bean used for this brewing method?  I know the stronger roasts get even stronger with different methods of brewiing, so what's a good place to start with the Turkish brew?

Posted November 26, 2005 link

Well, I tend to use so-called 'dark Lebanese', although there are degrees of darkness, and I prefer not to use the charcoal type. That said, you may be surprised at how sweet even a very dark roast can be when made with this method. This style of brewing confounds a lot of received wisdom about the dos and don'ts of coffee making, and we  should probably be asking ourselves why this is. With such a fine grind and high temperature, it should always lead to a bitter, over-extracted brew, but my experience is that, if you use appropriate coffee and don't overdo it, you will usually end up with a lovely, sweet, full-bodied little cup, unlike anything else.

Try to find a shop specialising  in Middle-Eastern food, which also sells coffee, and get their advice. They will usually be only too happy to tell you what's best and be glad you have an interest. My own supplier also used to roast on the premises before he moved to a different shop, which was fantastic. But the coffee is almost always fresh because of the large turnover. Some will even sell Yemeni or Ethiopian varieties that are very difficult to find elsewhere. Probably, anywhere that can pulverise it for you will sell appropriate coffee, so try as many kinds as you can to see what you prefer. And my advice is to make it strong first. This will bring out the best flavour and foam. If you really don't like it this way, then you could dilute it. But it is really meant to be a strong, short drink, and trying to make it weak when brewing will not work. I also always eat something small and sweet with it.

Hope you find something you can enjoy.

Matt
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
Gobs
Senior Member
Gobs
Joined: 5 Sep 2004
Posts: 41
Location: Hr
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Sun Nov 27, 2005, 2:22am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

I found a few Turkish coffee links that might be of interest to everyone here.

  1. TC1
  2. TC2
  3. Lokum recipe

On the bottom of the second link, it says, "Coffee should be black as hell, strong as death, and sweet as love." and I have seen that a few times on coffee related topics and I think Mark has metioned it a few times as well. In this quote, it says that it is a Turkish Proverb. I'm wondering if it is?

Gobs

 
"I never discovered anything with my rational mind."
- Albert Einstein
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
showing page 3 of 18 first page | last page previous page | next page
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Discussions > Articles > How-To Feedback > Brewing Turkish...  
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered     Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
Discussions Quick Jump:
Symbols: New Posts= New Posts since your last visit      No New Posts= No New Posts since last visit     Go to most recent post= Newest post
Forum Rules:
No profanity, illegal acts or personal attacks will be tolerated in these discussion boards.
No commercial posting of any nature will be tolerated; only private sales by private individuals, in the "Buy and Sell" forum.
No SEO style postings will be tolerated. SEO related posts will result in immediate ban from CoffeeGeek.
No cross posting allowed - do not post your topic to more than one forum, nor repost a topic to the same forum.
Who Can Read The Forum? Anyone can read posts in these discussion boards.
Who Can Post New Topics? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post new topics.
Who Can Post Replies? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post replies.
Can Photos be posted? Anyone can post photos in their new topics or replies.
Who can change or delete posts? Any CoffeeGeek member can edit their own posts. Only moderators can delete posts.
Probationary Period: If you are a new signup for CoffeeGeek, you cannot promote, endorse, criticise or otherwise post an unsolicited endorsement for any company, product or service in your first five postings.
Stefano's Espresso Care
Repair - Parts - Sales
Factory Authorized &
Trained Technician
www.espressocare.com
Home | Opinions | Consumer Reviews | Guides & How Tos | CoffeeGeek Reviews | Resources | Forums | Contact Us
CoffeeGeek.com, CoffeeGeek, and Coffee Geek, along with all associated content & images are copyright ©2000-2014 by Mark Prince, all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Content, code, and images may not be reused without permission. Usage of this website signifies agreement with our Terms and Conditions. (0.303868055344)
Privacy Policy | Copyright Info | Terms and Conditions | CoffeeGeek Advertisers | RSS | Find us on Google+