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verbum
Senior Member


Joined: 11 Mar 2008
Posts: 5
Location: istanbul
Expertise: Professional

Espresso: K80
Grinder: Rancilio Md 80
Drip: Rancilio Class 8
Roaster: Caffe River
Posted Tue Mar 11, 2008, 9:51pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

Hi, i found this forum from nowhere and enjoyed it. I would like to share some tips and information about turkish coffee, as well. It's not easy to prepare turkish coffee without seeing how it's made. So if you are desperate about it or if you have no time to deal with it, these machines are your savior;
Click Here (www.arcelik.com.tr)
tp://www.arcelik.com.tr/Cultures/en-US/ArcelikProducts/7489870100.htm?&productCode=7489870100

Lokum would be fine with turkish coffee. Lokum is called turkish delight around the world, the word comes from lokma means 'a bite'. Kaymak is made of the cream of the milk, means 'to slip'. These are all ancient turkish words.( at least 10 centuries old :)).
You may drink a good turkish coffee not only in Turkey. There are many independant countries now, were the cities of ottoman empires. So for example; You can find turkish coffee in Greece, Bulgaria, Croatia, Romania, Syria,Egypt... The coffee doesn't taste the same but is similar.

Appropiate coffee would be Yemeni coffee. But it's not a must!! Any arabic coffee would be fine.
The coffee will taste better if the beams are double roasted!
The coffee beams must be grinded like powder.
Do not brew more than two cups in cezve.  

And finally, there is this special kind of turkish coffee; mandabatmaz (means:buffalo doesn't sink :)) which is very heavy and dense. x2 coffee brewed in hot water.
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bavlar
Senior Member


Joined: 8 May 2008
Posts: 1
Location: turkey
Expertise: Professional

Posted Thu May 8, 2008, 5:34am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

As a turkish women, I must advice some details about brewing turkish coffee:
If you want to drink a delicate turkish coffee; the most important points are;
you must use cold water, the ground coffee must be fresh.
If you buy turkish ground coffee, do not hesitate to use espresso machine to make coffee.
Use the steamer to brew it. the taste is excellent. It means that you don't need CEZVE.
P.S.: in turkish we dont use the name IBRIK, we say cezve only.
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JeffPersson
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JeffPersson
Joined: 11 May 2008
Posts: 268
Location: Goodyear, AZ
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Mini Vivaldi II & TWIST v2
Grinder: SM90, Preciso, Porlex, PeDe...
Vac Pot: Yama 8-cup
Drip: trifectaMB, HG, Chemex...
Roaster: Behmor 1600
Posted Tue May 13, 2008, 6:31pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

My friend originally born in Qatar and his wife from Lebanon introduced me to this style of coffee. It is absolutely wonderful. They use a coffee with cardamon in it, which was surprising to me as I had never heard of cardamon outside my family's traditional Scadinavian cooking. It was only then I learned of cardamon's widespread appeal. Who knew?  :)

 
My wife plans to sign me up for the first season of Coffee Gadget Hoarders.
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SuZannelovescoffee
Senior Member


Joined: 2 Sep 2008
Posts: 1
Location: Oklahoma City
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Tue Sep 2, 2008, 10:12am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

A nice tutorial.....I've been drinking Turkish coffee since around 1990.....my ex-husband is from Saudi and I learned the "art" from him.  As traditional arabic coffee drinkers prefer, cardamon was an essential ingredient, which took some getting used to.  Add a traditonal arabic dessert and after dinner satisfaction skyrockets  :o)
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Crow
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Crow
Joined: 18 Dec 2008
Posts: 57
Location: Reno, Nevada
Expertise: Just starting

Grinder: Zass Havanna
Vac Pot: Cona Old no. 2
Roaster: Poppery II
Posted Sun Jan 11, 2009, 9:53pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

The Turkish coffee section at Sweet Marias claims that the one (and only) thing a blade grinder will do well is Turkish coffee.

I can testify that our Krups 208 (25 year old) blade grinder will make the tiniest grains imaginable in 10 seconds and very uniform in size. Krup's still makes several widely available similar models: oval shaped body, see through top, stainless chamber and blade, cleans in seconds with damp paper towel and dedicated toothbrush, costs less than dirt.

It's not worth a *&$ for anything else except Turkish.

Makes sense.

First, grind 2 seconds and you have grain sizes from huge to medium and some of everything in between.

Press another 2 seconds and you have another ridiculous mixture, only smaller.

Another 4 seconds and you have 100%  Turkish talcuum, for the grinder cannot make any grains smaller than that.

We were born in a central California and 1/4 the population in that town were wealthy Assyrians (Iraqi Christians). Many of them made Turkish coffee with Ibriks using cheap blade grinders for it.
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mahirturkishcoffee
Senior Member
mahirturkishcoffee
Joined: 27 Jan 2009
Posts: 11
Location: Turkey
Expertise: I live coffee

Posted Tue Jan 27, 2009, 5:14am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

It's good to see there're hundres of replies about Turkish coffee! :)

I'm writing a blog completely dedicated to Turkish coffee: Mahir's Turkish Coffeehouse

I read some replies about automatic Turkish coffee machine, here is a guide about the machine:

Automatic Turkish Coffee Machine (Photo Guide)

Please contact me if you've any question regarding Turkish coffee, which is beyond coffee...

 
Mahir's Turkish Coffeehouse
www.turkishcoffeehouse.blogspot.com
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turkishcoffeeworld
Senior Member
turkishcoffeeworld
Joined: 6 Jan 2008
Posts: 6
Location: Corona
Expertise: Professional

Posted Fri Mar 13, 2009, 9:13am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

Hi Mark,

First of all I love the CoffeeGeek and truly appreciate your work in creating this immense knowledge base for everyone to enjoy.  But I would like to ask you a one question:  Why Turkish OR Greek coffee?  As you know, what makes it Turkish is that; Turks, having had a long history of roasting nuts (going all the way back to the Central Asia), decided to roast the coffee beans (rather then boiling it as the Arabs were doing - and they still do; it's called "mira").  In addition, they grind the beans in flour mills to make it powder like, then mixed it with water and cooked it over low heat.  Method was perfected in the Ottoman palaces and then spread to the people.  This is well known and documented.  My question to you is; what makes it a Greek coffee?  

Please also note that, the The Greek junta that came into power in 1974 - at the height of the anti-Turkish hysteria about Cyprus - issued a decree banning the use of words that had "Turkish" in it; like centuries old "Turkish coffee", "Tourkolimani" (Turkish port – name of the main port in Pireaus), etc.  Up until then, Greeks simply called it "Turkish coffee" and most people in Greece call it "Turkish coffee" today.

Since everybody around the world (including the Greeks) already know that it is Turkish coffee; why not just give the credit to where it's due?
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mahirturkishcoffee
Senior Member
mahirturkishcoffee
Joined: 27 Jan 2009
Posts: 11
Location: Turkey
Expertise: I live coffee

Posted Fri Mar 13, 2009, 3:00pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

To me, it's meaningless to change names of somethings that are known all around the globe under one name... Think about `french kiss`, `french fry`, or `russian salad`... But sometimes we try to rename these well-known concepts because of political, economical, historical, or racial reasons. For instance, during the cold war period, some right-wing Turkish politicians tried to replace expression `russian salad` with `american salad`...

I think for the `Greek Coffee` case, the explanation mentioned in the post above is right... If you take a look at Greek writers Elias Petropoulos and Ilías Petrópoulos's book `Turkish Coffee in Greece`, you can find similiar information...

I don't want to carry this issue to a `national discussion` level... You can call your coffee `greek`, `albanian`, even `mars`if it's okay for you :-) it shouldn't bother us... But, I personally believe that if we're talking about almost boiling finely powdered roast coffee beans in a special pot, then from a historical point of view it's Turkish coffee.

In my Turkish coffee blog, I wrote something brief about variants of Turkish coffee. I'm planning to work on this issue and write a more comprehensive one.

Variants of Turkish Coffee

 
Mahir's Turkish Coffeehouse
www.turkishcoffeehouse.blogspot.com
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therealbean
Senior Member


Joined: 4 Mar 2009
Posts: 3
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Sat Apr 11, 2009, 12:30pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

Brewing Turkish Coffee

A great "how to", I was always a little apprehensive about trying to brew my own Turkish coffee, but that guide has made it really easy to understand and taken the mystery out of the process, thanks again

 
http://therealbean.co.uk
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Arby
Senior Member
Arby
Joined: 16 Apr 2009
Posts: 16
Location: Toronto, Canada
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Steel Moka Pot
Drip: Glass Carafe & Cone Filters
Posted Thu Jun 11, 2009, 12:12am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

I very much appreciated this look at Turkish coffee, which I have not yet tried. This is very interesting. The wiki info is also substantial, although it suffers a little from a lack of professional editing./ The thing about this is that it's different, and discovering it only makes one's examination and experience of coffee more interesting, a good thing.

 
** 13.5 trillion $ sit in tax havens, while political 'leaders' - who create deficits regular people don't ask for with tax cuts for tax evading corporations - whine that they can't afford social spending due to those deficits!!! **
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