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Brewing Turkish Coffee
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CraigA
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CraigA
Joined: 19 Dec 2001
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Location: Rexdale, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
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Posted Sat Jun 18, 2011, 3:37pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

cjs33139 Said:

CraigA,
From my research on Turkish Coffee sites I have found, maintained by actual Turks or those of Middle Eastern descent, their coffee takes a few minutes to prepare, maybe even 5 minutes, so how can yours only take 15 to 30 seconds?

Posted June 18, 2011 link

I'm not starting the timing from the start with cold water in the Ibrik & coffee up to the time the water starts to 'roll' at the narrow necked part of the Ibrik. I'm starting with fresh cold water & heating to the 'rolling' point (208 - 210░F Ibrik's brew temp), then adding my coffee.

I then do the traditional 3 rise ups & that's the part that takes 15 - 30 seconds. A standard shot on my Silvia takes 20 - 25 seconds & with that degree of coffee fineness, the Rocky was at an 8 setting. For the Turkish coffee the Rocky was about 2 notches above the zero point & I suppose twice as fine hence the shorter contact/brew time with the water. When I pour over the bloom & coffee, I stop short (the hold back liquid below the tapered neck) to try & keep as much of the expended coffee back as possible.

It seems to work for me, & I like the end result. {;-)

 
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kafes
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Joined: 7 Jul 2011
Posts: 3
Location: CALGARY
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Thu Jul 7, 2011, 11:25am
Subject: Re: Sandbox heater?!
 

I don't know what the sandbox maker is called, specifically.  It is very effective though.  It turns out a beautiful coffee.  Here's a greek site selling these machines.  Other commercial sites just call them electric coffee makers.  The things sticking out from the pots in this photo are a little sort of whisk that is more effective than a spoon, for those inclined to stir their coffee in the process.

kafes: E101_196x200.PNG
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mikeelovescoffee
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mikeelovescoffee
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Location: Beaverton
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Posted Mon Jul 11, 2011, 4:22pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

Love this article! I tried turkish coffee once and loved it. I cant wait to get home and try making this for myself!
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sidthecat
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sidthecat
Joined: 27 May 2010
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Location: L.A.
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Posted Mon Mar 19, 2012, 8:39am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

I had an Israeli mechanic who made exquisite coffee with his blowtorch. I remember trying to make it on a hot plate while waiting to pitch a story idea at long-defunct Turner Animation, with mediocre results. Best cup of coffee I ever had anywhere was a cup of Turkish at a Mediterranean restaurant in the Beverly Center back when the place mattered. They served it with a strip of lemon peel and it was nirvana in a cup.
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victoriab17
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Joined: 3 Feb 2013
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Location: LAKELAND
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Posted Sun Feb 3, 2013, 9:27am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

I have a question about the brewing process. I'm no coffee expert, I'm just looking into this as a present for my boyfriend who is a coffee enthusiast.
So it's kind of expensive to buy the grinder and the ibrik, so I was just wondering if there was any way to brew without the ibrik? Or does that just ruin it?
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kafes
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Joined: 7 Jul 2011
Posts: 3
Location: CALGARY
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Sun Feb 3, 2013, 12:20pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

victoriab17 Said:

I have a question about the brewing process. I'm no coffee expert, I'm just looking into this as a present for my boyfriend who is a coffee enthusiast.
So it's kind of expensive to buy the grinder and the ibrik, so I was just wondering if there was any way to brew without the ibrik? Or does that just ruin it?

Posted February 3, 2013 link

The briki/ibrik is pretty important.  The sloped sides of the pot work to help create the little layer of foam on the top.  The greeks call that the ka´maki, and it's considered a must-have for a proper coffee.  The narrowness allows the coffee to rise, indicating its readiness, without making the coffee reach a full boil.  There are small, stainless steel versions of the ibriks which are cheap and should be relatively easy to find.  Most turkish, greek, or middle eastern grocers probably have them.  Amazon sells small ones online as cheap as about $7.  

The grinder is not necessary, given that good coffee can be easily purchased, and it's already perfectly ground.  Stylistically, there are some differences.  Greek stuff tends to be a light roast; mild, but rich and nutty.  Some of the more common brands are Bravo and Loumidis.  Turkish and lebanese style seems to lean towards a very dark roast; also quite delicious.  Often, the lebanese coffee contains cardamon, so check the package to know whether you're buying it with or without cardamon.  

I've seen coffees made at lebanese restaurants, and they sometimes use a slightly different process.  They will put the sugar and water in the briki, heating it until it's starts to steam, and then they will add the coffee.  It rises shortly after, and produces a milder flavour than if the coffee is in from the start.  I have to say that I prefer this method when using a darker roast from Lebanon or Turkey.  

Most importantly, do not allow the coffee to reach a full boil.  It should rise in the briki, and then be removed from the heat promptly.  If it boils, the flavour will be ruined, and the grounds will not settle properly to the bottom of the cup when served.  

Şerefe!
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ironmike
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Joined: 18 Aug 2013
Posts: 1
Location: İstanbul
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Sun Aug 18, 2013, 6:41am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

hi all,
this is a great site. Thanks for the work in creating and maintaining it.
For those in Turkey - I have recently moved to Istanbul to work - I would like to ask if you can recommend any stores on the Asian side to purchase a reasonable espresso machine. Depending on prices in Turkey, I will look for a Delonghi EC155 or a Gaggia 14101. I'm living quite a way east, near Via/Port, Pendik.
many thanks in advance,
Mike
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Happiest
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Joined: 17 Nov 2012
Posts: 32
Location: South of tundra
Expertise: I love coffee

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Posted Sun Sep 15, 2013, 4:55pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

can anyone speak to the proper amount of cardamom seeds that need to be added to the fine grounds? I've had this prepared many times, by an old friend of mine, however it was always from a preground Vac bag and I'd like to recreate the experience by using fresh ground along with Cardamom seeds that I plan on grinding in a pestle.

Any ideas?
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AnanasaHandmade
Junior Member
AnanasaHandmade
Joined: 11 Aug 2014
Posts: 1
Location: Dubai
Expertise: Just starting

Posted Mon Aug 11, 2014, 1:50am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

Turkish coffee is one of our favorites, we recently visited a Turkish coffee expert in Dubai, and she even reads the cup! You can read more about it by visiting our blog on Ananasa
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KettyRoberto
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KettyRoberto
Joined: 13 Oct 2014
Posts: 1
Location: Tampa, FL
Expertise: I like coffee

Posted Mon Oct 13, 2014, 4:22am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

Nice Information. Where is coffeegeek shop in Tampa,FL?

 
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