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Enkerli
Senior Member
Enkerli
Joined: 1 Aug 2004
Posts: 724
Location: Montreal, Qc
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: (At cafés, not at home)
Grinder: Hario hand grinders
Vac Pot: (Moka Pot) Bialetti Brikka
Drip: Steep and release pour-over
Roaster: iRoast-2
Posted Sun Feb 11, 2007, 1:41pm
Subject: Proper or Good? (Brewing Turkish Coffee)
 

Been brewing coffee using some ideas from this thread. No idea how close my methods are to what would be proper in a specific part of the world but... Man! This is good!
Just roasted 130g of Ethiopian Sidamo to somewhere within second crack, just before getting visible specks of oil on the bean surface. Actually, not quite the "silk" phase, but very close.
Ground some of it at my Bodum Antigua's finest grind level. Put the grounds in my ibrik-style pot (with too wide an opening), poured water over the grounds, stirred the solution with a chopstick, put the pot on a preheated electric stove burner on high. When the cap started to rise, I took the pot of the heat, stirred a bit, and waited a few seconds. I then held the pot at some distance over the burner and waited for the liquid to rise. I then stirred again, and poured part of the coffee in one of my glasses. Brought back the pot to the burner to heat up again and there has been some boiling involved. I took the pot off the heat and poured the coffee in the other glasses.
No matter how inadequate my technique was, the coffee was delicious. Full of all sorts of neat flavours, many of which are hard to describe.

One thing about brewing methods is that they really enable you to taste different things. Thanks to this thread, Mark's how-tos, and some experimentation, I get to enjoy coffee in a new way.

 
Alex
http://enkerli.com/
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ChrisC
Senior Member


Joined: 11 Dec 2006
Posts: 113
Location: Montreal, Canada
Expertise: Pro Barista

Espresso: PID Rancilio Silvia
Grinder: Rocky Doserless, modded
Vac Pot: $35 from Chinatown
Drip: Brewt
Posted Sun Feb 11, 2007, 3:11pm
Subject: Re: Proper or Good? (Brewing Turkish Coffee)
 

Hey Alex,

Glad you've been having fun! I was doing a lot of experimenting with this style of coffee right after getting back from Greece, using a package of pre-ground and a pot I bought there. Got some good tasting coffee, but couldn't get the foam the way it was served in Greece, even though they were using pre-ground too. I'm going to try again soon with some fresh ground beans, perhaps I'll have better luck.

We'll have to discuss this at the next Montreal jam!

Take care,
C
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Enkerli
Senior Member
Enkerli
Joined: 1 Aug 2004
Posts: 724
Location: Montreal, Qc
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: (At cafés, not at home)
Grinder: Hario hand grinders
Vac Pot: (Moka Pot) Bialetti Brikka
Drip: Steep and release pour-over
Roaster: iRoast-2
Posted Sun Feb 11, 2007, 3:46pm
Subject: Re: Proper or Good? (Brewing Turkish Coffee)
 

Well, I'm not getting that much foam. And I haven't had true Turkish-style coffee nearly enough to really evaluate how proper my brews are.
Important thing is, I'm having fun and the coffee tastes good to me.

 
Alex
http://enkerli.com/
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ChrisC
Senior Member


Joined: 11 Dec 2006
Posts: 113
Location: Montreal, Canada
Expertise: Pro Barista

Espresso: PID Rancilio Silvia
Grinder: Rocky Doserless, modded
Vac Pot: $35 from Chinatown
Drip: Brewt
Posted Sun Feb 11, 2007, 4:57pm
Subject: Re: Proper or Good? (Brewing Turkish Coffee)
 

Absolutely, that's the goal -- but I can personally testify that if we can figure it out, the foam makes it even better. :-)

Cheers!
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Det_Nosnip
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Joined: 23 Feb 2007
Posts: 12
Location: Chicago, IL
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Gaggia Carezza
Grinder: Starbucks Barista
Drip: Some Mr. Coffee thing
Roaster: Not yet!
Posted Fri Mar 9, 2007, 11:38pm
Subject: Grinding Turkish Coffee
 

So I got a Turkish mill to grind turkish coffee, but when I use it, the coffee ends up with a very metallic taste...any suggestions as to how to fix that?
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kahvedelisi
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kahvedelisi
Joined: 1 Apr 2006
Posts: 221
Location: istanbul/Turkiye
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Rancilio Epoca ST1
Grinder: LaCimbali Jr, Rancilio MD...
Vac Pot: Hario MCA-3
Drip: filter cone, Aeropress,...
Roaster: Air Popcorn Popper
Posted Sun Apr 22, 2007, 4:47pm
Subject: Re: Grinding Turkish Coffee
 

Det_Nosnip Said:

So I got a Turkish mill to grind turkish coffee, but when I use it, the coffee ends up with a very metallic taste...any suggestions as to how to fix that?

Posted March 9, 2007 link

One reason can be inner meaterial used. If it's cast iron it happens (probably burrs oiled against rust etc) grind some rice, then some coffee beans, then rice again and coffee beans, do this couple times (till at the end you get rid of rice). Also fill it as much as you plan to use, don't keep your beans in it. Grind and empty rest of your unused beans. Plus freshness of your beans, the pot (cezve/ibrik) you're brewing in, water etc may effect the taste.

 
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kahvedelisi
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kahvedelisi
Joined: 1 Apr 2006
Posts: 221
Location: istanbul/Turkiye
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Rancilio Epoca ST1
Grinder: LaCimbali Jr, Rancilio MD...
Vac Pot: Hario MCA-3
Drip: filter cone, Aeropress,...
Roaster: Air Popcorn Popper
Posted Sun Apr 22, 2007, 5:09pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

as an answer to "no foam" well you're probably boiling it and no other reason :) Believe me no other reason because for the sake of not waking up people (4 am here) I used 5 months old pre ground and i was able to get crema like foam 10 min. ago (well some skills required too heh heee) Anyways what I mean unlike other brewing styles turkish doesn't require fresh beans for getting crema/foam. You can achive almost same foam results with older beans etc but sure the taste will not be as good as fresh ones ;)

Beware: Turkish coffee (or greek coffee or any other type of coffee) should not be boiled. Just bring it to boiling level but NEVER let it boil. Also "one time, two time, three time" is not the right way. Yes it's another style and yes the result product may taste good to some but if we are talking about "proper" turkish brewing you don't do that (just think about proper espresso brewing then you'll see what I mean). Stirring after it reached to level of boiling?? NEVER. You only stir at the begining just before you put it over flame or right after you put it over flame, but you don't stir again. Also if you're having difficulties, I recommend brewing turkish in one cup sized cezve, you'll get better results, then you can move on to bigger sizes.

Btw I wrote this several times but I'll repeat again (though it's not a rule, and you don't have to do like this, I personally am trying all kind of roast levels and beans from different origins) turkish coffee beans sold in turkish and greek market are Rio minas low grade beans. Roasted to (generally) light city, or city or city + Darkest roast for turkish I've ever seen was full city + (not counting my own experiments) Well from my own experiments I can say, turkish brewing style and very dark roasts are not going well together (according to my taste), but again I'm not an expert at roasting when compared to people here ;)

 
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kahvedelisi
Senior Member
kahvedelisi
Joined: 1 Apr 2006
Posts: 221
Location: istanbul/Turkiye
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Rancilio Epoca ST1
Grinder: LaCimbali Jr, Rancilio MD...
Vac Pot: Hario MCA-3
Drip: filter cone, Aeropress,...
Roaster: Air Popcorn Popper
Posted Thu May 17, 2007, 7:56am
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

Ay ay ay! I liked this video and wanted to share :D

 
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Enkerli
Senior Member
Enkerli
Joined: 1 Aug 2004
Posts: 724
Location: Montreal, Qc
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: (At cafés, not at home)
Grinder: Hario hand grinders
Vac Pot: (Moka Pot) Bialetti Brikka
Drip: Steep and release pour-over
Roaster: iRoast-2
Posted Thu May 17, 2007, 6:05pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

It's a nice video to see the consistency we can get. There should be videos which really show the brewing method. Looked at some but it was hard to pick out what was happening in the cezve/ibrik. Difficult to film, it seems.

My method is probably not up to standards but I'm getting pretty satisfied with the results. And I do get a fair bit of foam.

 
Alex
http://enkerli.com/
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kahvedelisi
Senior Member
kahvedelisi
Joined: 1 Apr 2006
Posts: 221
Location: istanbul/Turkiye
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Rancilio Epoca ST1
Grinder: LaCimbali Jr, Rancilio MD...
Vac Pot: Hario MCA-3
Drip: filter cone, Aeropress,...
Roaster: Air Popcorn Popper
Posted Thu May 17, 2007, 8:37pm
Subject: Re: Brewing Turkish Coffee
 

Enkerli, the result you see in that video, well it doesn't require any skills all you do is add water, coffee and sugar if you want, rest is done by an electric turkish coffee machine Beko brand =D  This one to be more precise

I had started a topic about this type of machines and cezves before "Turkish Coffee Machines"

IMO if the aim is taste, consistency and ease of use then nothing can beat an electric one. But if the aim is doing it in traditional ways, again consistency and good tasting results are not far away too. But whenever I try to explain in forums, people prefer shutting their ears for some unknown reason :)) REALLY there is no need for brewing instructions video, because there are no secrets or tips or anything to exagerate. All you need is right tools and again whenever I speak of right tools I recieve tons of ancient and historical Turkish coffee item pictures, low flame gas burners, ibriks (btw which is for serving liquids such as water or sherbet actually, but NOT for brewing turkish coffee), stir throughoutly, no don't stir, one sec. one sec. stir to left then to right, add sugar before, no no, after, no it's best if you add it during the process, add cardamom, black pepper, ginger, hot chili  bla bla bla...WAAAH!! Turkish coffee is the easiest way of brewing coffee, yet people want to see it as a scientific invention and complicate it as much possible.

Actually at youtube there's a very detailed video about brewing turkish coffee, a young turkish girl explains it to her friend from USA, total 11 minutes in 2 videos, all english :) And people leave comments under it "interesting, nice, yeah!" what they don't know is this --> at the begining of second video, where she "finally" puts the cezve over stove, her mother enters the kitchen and she asks in Turkish "hey what are you doing", girl replies "turkish coffee", mother replies sternly "how you'll do that you don't know, you'll add sugar, coffee, so empty some of that water!", then it gets even funnier, she doesn't know how much coffee she should add, her mother behind gives instructions, while she also prepares cups etc :))) Later on this girl even babbles something like "always low flame, if it is not low, coffee won't be good" and I'm rolling my eyes, rolling, rolling, rolling!

PS. you don't need to see inside cezve, just make sure what's in it doesn't flow outside (which means don't let it boil), even if the coffee is stale it will still produce foam. Boiled coffee is not turkish coffee, it's another version.

 
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