Our Valued Sponsor
OpinionsConsumer ReviewsGuides and How TosCoffeeGeek ReviewsResourcesForums
Articles: How-To Article Feedback
How to Use a Pour Over Brewer
Coffee Kids
Help folks who help folks in coffee producing nations.
coffeekids.org
 
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered  
Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Discussions > Articles > How-To Feedback > How to Use a...  
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
showing page 8 of 9 first page | last page previous page | next page
Author Messages
Daniel437
Senior Member


Joined: 20 Apr 2012
Posts: 22
Location: Berlin
Expertise: I love coffee

Posted Fri May 25, 2012, 4:13am
Subject: Re: How to Use a Pour Over Brewer
 

Awesome guide, Mark. I think too many people are scared of the pour over. I included a link to this article in my guide, "Gourmet Coffee on the Cheap– The Ultimate Guide"
Click Here (www.coffeekrave.com)
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
BeanSurfing
Senior Member
BeanSurfing
Joined: 29 May 2012
Posts: 1
Location: Sydney
Expertise: I live coffee

Posted Tue May 29, 2012, 2:00pm
Subject: Re: How to Use a Pour Over Brewer
 

Wow, you guys are seriously into your coffee!

The filter coffee scene is just starting to hit mainstream here in Sydney and I think many "barista's" need to learn the basics before embarking on manual pourovers etc.

I have seen in the US full brew bars with like 10 pourovers on the go as customers grab their morning coffee. Is this the norm there? Australia is by far an espresso and milk coffee culture so how would you approach a gradual move toward an increased filter coffee demand?

Rgds,

BeanSurfing.com.au
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
Timmer78
Senior Member
Timmer78
Joined: 6 Dec 2012
Posts: 12
Location: New Mexico
Expertise: Just starting

Espresso: Quick Mill QM67
Grinder: Baratza Vario/Bodum Bistro
Vac Pot: none
Drip: Technivorm KBG-741/Hario V60
Roaster: Fresh Roast SR500
Posted Thu Jan 17, 2013, 9:57pm
Subject: Re: How to Use a Pour Over Brewer
 

I just bought the Hario drip pot and have made a few brews before I saw this guide. I had been using the technique on SeattleCoffeeGear's review for the Hario Drip Pot. What surprised me with this guide is he recommends stirring the slurry and I have definitely not tried that. I haven't seen anyone stir the slurry on youtube either.  Maybe in the guide he isn't using a hario drip pot?

One other question for those of you using the Hario Buono kettle. I've seen flow restrictor's on the web and was wondering if anyone has a DIY method using anything from the local hardware store (lowes/home depot) etc that will do the trick. Thanks!

- Tim
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
dugsdale
Senior Member


Joined: 10 Aug 2013
Posts: 4
Location: NYC
Expertise: I love coffee

Grinder: Hario hand ceramic burr...
Drip: ancient Melitta porcelain...
Roaster: Porto Rico Coffee Co.
Posted Sat Aug 10, 2013, 8:59am
Subject: Re: How to Use a Pour Over Brewer
 

Very late to this thread, but wanted to post a comment or two. I notice no one's answered a previous question about water temp., other than "just off the boil," and I wanted to raise it again. I've been using a Hario hand burr grinder, Melitta paper filters in an old porcelain cone I've had for decades, and various espressos from my local coffee emporium. This setup seems to work beautifully, but I'm experimenting a bit with water temperature. (The experimentation has been more or less forced on me; the idea of heating a kettle of water to boiling, in the middle of a sticky, sweltering summer, strikes me as unnecessary torture.) Instead I've been using an (also ancient) appliance called a Sunbeam Hotshot, which is a water reservoir housed in a tall rack. It heats the water in the reservoir to a reliable 180 degrees, and holds at that temp long enough for you to take care of 'bloom' chores; by the time you pour the rest into the cone it's probably 175 or so. This seems (to me anyway) to make an excellent cup of coffee.

If anyone has seriously tried varying water temperature in an otherwise standardized setup, I'd love to hear about it.

Also, an earlier poster referred to paper filters as 'glued.' They're not glued, they're CRIMPED. I use Melitta white paper as opposed to brown paper because in my experience the crimp doesn't hold on the brown filters, and you end up with 1/2" of coffee sludge at the bottom of your cup. I DO however pour some boiling water through the white paper filters before I put the ground coffee in, to leach out any leftover processing artifacts, which may be laughably anal to some folks, and well, maybe it is.

When the weather moderates a bit, maybe i'll try some "science fair project" experimentation with water temperature, 'just off the boil' versus '175 more or less.' Till then, if anyone has any thoughts, I'd love to read them.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
IMAWriter
Senior Member
IMAWriter
Joined: 4 Jul 2002
Posts: 5,864
Location: Brentwood, TN
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Bezzera Strega
Grinder: Forte, OE Pharos,...
Vac Pot: Adcraft SS, Yama 8 cup
Drip: Brazen, Kalita, Chemex,...
Roaster: Behmor 1600, CO/UFO combo
Posted Sat Aug 10, 2013, 9:50am
Subject: Re: How to Use a Pour Over Brewer
 

Doug, 180 is WAY too low a temperature. Brew should be at 200-203, as you'll quickly lose water temperature whilst pouring.
Glad you pre-rinse. It is necessary to extricate the chemical taste from the filters.

Slightly off topic, but you mentioned using "espresso blends" for drip.
IMO, in most cases, this is not such a tasty thing. Most espresso is roasted either darker, or at differing profiles than a roast meant for drip/French press, etc.
Instead, I'd recommend trying a SO (single origin) like a tasty El Salvador, Guatemalan, Ethiopian Yirgacheff, etc.

You may find you'll now taste a cleaner, more defined cup.

Again, get a good electric kettle. Many are priced at $29, some more. They generate little or no kitchen heat.

Last thing, do you have a proper curved spout pouring kettle?
With your setup, it may not be as critical, but with a Hario/Kalita, Chemex, etc it IS. You want a slow, CONTROLLED pour.

Let us know how things are going.

 
Rob J (LMWDP #187)
My Music Production web site:
www.robertjason.com
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
dugsdale
Senior Member


Joined: 10 Aug 2013
Posts: 4
Location: NYC
Expertise: I love coffee

Grinder: Hario hand ceramic burr...
Drip: ancient Melitta porcelain...
Roaster: Porto Rico Coffee Co.
Posted Sun Aug 11, 2013, 11:49am
Subject: Re: How to Use a Pour Over Brewer
 

Thanks, IMA, I appreciate the feedback. I'll have to prospect some electric kettles. I also appreciate the single origin suggestions; I've been drinking basically nothing but epresso (Italian or Brazilian) for years but will try the ones you mention. (Parenthetically, I don't drink espresso 'blends,' if by blend you mean "our 'gourmet' cherry-vanilla-mocha-supremo frou-frou flavor with a little espresso thrown in' kind of thing, just straight-up espresso. It'll be fun to A-B that with some of the varieties you recommended.)

Your comment about espresso roast being intended for a different mode of preparation than I'm using (if I'm understanding you correctly, that is) makes me wonder if I should adjust my grinder to a finer grind (like the espresso machines use). We'll see--I look forward to trying out your suggestions--and appreciate your response!
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
IMAWriter
Senior Member
IMAWriter
Joined: 4 Jul 2002
Posts: 5,864
Location: Brentwood, TN
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Bezzera Strega
Grinder: Forte, OE Pharos,...
Vac Pot: Adcraft SS, Yama 8 cup
Drip: Brazen, Kalita, Chemex,...
Roaster: Behmor 1600, CO/UFO combo
Posted Sun Aug 11, 2013, 2:05pm
Subject: Re: How to Use a Pour Over Brewer
 

dugsdale Said:

Thanks, IMA, I appreciate the feedback. I'll have to prospect some electric kettles. I also appreciate the single origin suggestions; I've been drinking basically nothing but epresso (Italian or Brazilian) for years but will try the ones you mention. (Parenthetically, I don't drink espresso 'blends,' if by blend you mean "our 'gourmet' cherry-vanilla-mocha-supremo frou-frou flavor with a little espresso thrown in' kind of thing, just straight-up espresso. It'll be fun to A-B that with some of the varieties you recommended.)

Your comment about espresso roast being intended for a different mode of preparation than I'm using (if I'm understanding you correctly, that is) makes me wonder if I should adjust my grinder to a finer grind (like the espresso machines use). We'll see--I look forward to trying out your suggestions--and appreciate your response!

Posted August 11, 2013 link

No no. An espresso BLEND is more than 1 bean in it, such as a Brasilian blended with an Ethiopian Sidamo and Sumatra.

I need to get you out of the coffee gutter! LOL
We don't do flavored coffees here, nor Starbucks (unless at the airport, and then GRUDGINGLY.)
Also, no canned (Italian) coffee, unless there is nothing else. You want coffee roasted within a week of when you purchased it for best results.
When you do a manual pour-over, you shouyld see what's called "bloom." This is a expelling of the excess co2/carbonation still present in the roast due to it's freshness.
If you Don't see this, your coffee is too old. It will be bitter, and most likely oily.

I would recommend you check out a book/or purchase it written by a real guru of good coffee, Ken Davids. he has many, but start with "Coffee a Guide to Buying Brewing and Enjoying."
It was/is my bible. He was a few others, ALL worth owning. Great reading as well.

 
Rob J (LMWDP #187)
My Music Production web site:
www.robertjason.com
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
coffeeblack
Senior Member


Joined: 8 Dec 2005
Posts: 6
Location: GrantsPass, OR
Expertise: I love coffee

Grinder: Braun
Drip: paper / cone
Posted Sun Aug 11, 2013, 3:36pm
Subject: Re: How to Use a Pour Over Brewer
 

I'd like to commend the PEETS coffee filters, made with oxygenated instead of bleached paper.

(I'm on a crusade to get the world to use a slightly less white standard for their paper  - -  ALL their paper  - -  one of these days I'm getting my website running, not done it yet, sigh:
JASMN.com  - -   Just A Shade More Natural     - -  think of the immense quantities of bleach the environment wouldn't have to cope with.)

PEETS is a pioneer in good coffee, Berkeley CA based; they also have a program where they ship FRESH roasted coffee, splitting the ship costs; excellent folks, excellent coffee (Mine is ***** whole bean {secret, ho ho...}).  To sign up, become a Peetnik, call them, 1-888-PEETNIK.
NO I don't have any connection with them except to use their products  - -   and to stop in for a cuppa at the Vine Street shop in Berkeley when I visit the Bay Area...
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
IMAWriter
Senior Member
IMAWriter
Joined: 4 Jul 2002
Posts: 5,864
Location: Brentwood, TN
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Bezzera Strega
Grinder: Forte, OE Pharos,...
Vac Pot: Adcraft SS, Yama 8 cup
Drip: Brazen, Kalita, Chemex,...
Roaster: Behmor 1600, CO/UFO combo
Posted Sun Aug 11, 2013, 3:50pm
Subject: Re: How to Use a Pour Over Brewer
 

Doug, I've copy/pasted a partial list of artisan roasters throughout the US. Our Member Jason Lewis compiled this.
Zin's Roaster list:
California:
Barefoot Roasters, Santa Clara, CA (12-ounce bags)
Bluebottle Coffee Co., Oakland, CA (16-ounce bags)
Ecco Caffè, Sonoma, CA (16-ounce bags)
Flying Goat Coffee, Healdsburg, CA (12-ounce bags)
Four Barrel Coffee, San Francisco, CA (12-ounce bags)
Graffeo, San Francisco, CA (16-ounce bags)
Henry's House of Coffee, San Francisco, CA (16-ounce bags)
Klatch Roasting, San Dimas, CA (12-ounce and 5-pound bags)
Peet's Coffee & Tea, Emeryville, CA (16-ounce bags online; 12-ounce bags in markets; 8-ounce, 16-ounce, 2-pound bags in Peet's stores)
Ritual Coffee Roasters, San Francisco, CA (12-ounce and 16-ounce bags)
Verve Coffee Roasters, Santa Cruz, CA (12-ounce bags)
West Coast Roasting, Los Angeles, CA (16-ounce bags)

Idaho:
Doma Coffee, Post Falls, ID (16-ounce bags)

Illinois:
Intelligentsia Coffee, Chicago, IL (8-ounce and 16-ounce bags; 1-kilogram and 5-pound bags)
Metropolis Coffee, Chicago, IL (16-ounce bags)

Kansas:
PT's Coffee, Topeka, KS (16-ounce and 5-pound bags)

Massachusetts:
Atomic Café, Beverly, MA (12-ounce bags; 2-pound and 5-pound bags)
Barrington Coffee Roasting Co., Lee, MA (16-ounce bags)
George Howell's Terroir Coffee, Acton, MA (12-ounce bags)

Minnesota:
Paradise Roasters, Ramsey, MN (12-ounce bags)

Nebraska:
Coffee Emergency, Lincoln, NE (8-ounce and 16-ounce, 2-pound and 5-pound bags)

New York:
Gimmie! Coffee, Ithaca, NY (16-ounce and 5-pound bags)

North Carolina:
Counter Culture Coffee, Durham, NC (12-ounce bags)

Oklahoma:
Double Shot Coffee, Tulsa, Oklahoma (16-ounce bags)

Oregon:
Stumptown Coffee Roasters, Portland, OR (12-ounce bags)

Pennsylvania:
Caffè Fresco, Port Griffith, PA (12-ounce AND 16-ounce bags; customer choice)
Len's Espresso Blends, Pittsburgh, PA (16-ounce bags)

Texas:
 Cuvée Coffee, Austin, TX (12-ounce and 2-pound bags)

Utah:
Caffè d'Bolla, Salt Lake City, UT (12-ounce bags)

Washington:
Batdorf & Bronson Coffee Roasters, Olympia, WA (16-ounce bags, with some limited offerings in 12-ounce bags)  (Note: B&B also has a location in Atlanta, GA)
Cafè D'arte, Seattle WA (16-ounce and 2-pound bags)
Caffè Vita Roasting Co., Seattle WA (16-ounce bags)
Espresso Vivace Roasteria, Seattle, WA (8-ounce bags, priced per pound)
Victrola Coffee, Seattle, WA (8-ounce and 16-ounce bags)
Zoka Coffee, Seattle, WA (12-ounce bags)

British Columbia:
49th Parallel Roasters, Vancouver, BC (12-ounce bags)
Caffè Artigiano, Vancouver, BC (16-ounce bags)
Discovery Coffee, Victoria, BC (sizes???)


That said, as you're in NYC, check out some local roasters. Often, they'll sell you 10-12 day old coffee at a discount. usually, for drip up to 20days, if stored properly will give you excellent results.
I'd add Red Bird Roasters (or Redbird Coffee) They are in Montana,and have excellent coffee and really excellent prices.
Same with Veltons Coffee in Washington St.

 
Rob J (LMWDP #187)
My Music Production web site:
www.robertjason.com
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
dugsdale
Senior Member


Joined: 10 Aug 2013
Posts: 4
Location: NYC
Expertise: I love coffee

Grinder: Hario hand ceramic burr...
Drip: ancient Melitta porcelain...
Roaster: Porto Rico Coffee Co.
Posted Mon Aug 12, 2013, 10:36am
Subject: Re: How to Use a Pour Over Brewer
 

Well, thanks everybody. this is a lot of really good information and I appreciate it. I think the first thing to do is standardize all my measurements and quantities (water, coffee etc) and then follow your lead on stuff to try out (and there's plenty here). Thinking of going the Hario V60-2 route for filters & cone, maybe acquire a Bonavita electric kettle (love the spout on those things), all of which would clear the decks for some serious coffee experimentation. Really looking forward to the trip, and again, humble thanks to all!
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
showing page 8 of 9 first page | last page previous page | next page
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Discussions > Articles > How-To Feedback > How to Use a...  
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered     Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
Discussions Quick Jump:
Symbols: New Posts= New Posts since your last visit      No New Posts= No New Posts since last visit     Go to most recent post= Newest post
Forum Rules:
No profanity, illegal acts or personal attacks will be tolerated in these discussion boards.
No commercial posting of any nature will be tolerated; only private sales by private individuals, in the "Buy and Sell" forum.
No SEO style postings will be tolerated. SEO related posts will result in immediate ban from CoffeeGeek.
No cross posting allowed - do not post your topic to more than one forum, nor repost a topic to the same forum.
Who Can Read The Forum? Anyone can read posts in these discussion boards.
Who Can Post New Topics? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post new topics.
Who Can Post Replies? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post replies.
Can Photos be posted? Anyone can post photos in their new topics or replies.
Who can change or delete posts? Any CoffeeGeek member can edit their own posts. Only moderators can delete posts.
Probationary Period: If you are a new signup for CoffeeGeek, you cannot promote, endorse, criticise or otherwise post an unsolicited endorsement for any company, product or service in your first five postings.
Commercial Equipment
Nuova Simonelli, La Marzocco, Rancilio. Nationwide installation. Instant financing options.
www.seattlecoffeegear.com
Home | Opinions | Consumer Reviews | Guides & How Tos | CoffeeGeek Reviews | Resources | Forums | Contact Us
CoffeeGeek.com, CoffeeGeek, and Coffee Geek, along with all associated content & images are copyright ©2000-2014 by Mark Prince, all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Content, code, and images may not be reused without permission. Usage of this website signifies agreement with our Terms and Conditions. (0.250407934189)
Privacy Policy | Copyright Info | Terms and Conditions | CoffeeGeek Advertisers | RSS | Find us on Google+