Our Valued Sponsor
OpinionsConsumer ReviewsGuides and How TosCoffeeGeek ReviewsResourcesForums
Articles: Products First Look Feedback
Bodum Granos Automatic Espresso Machine
Stefano's Espresso Care
Repair - Parts - Sales
Factory Authorized &
Trained Technician
www.espressocare.com
 
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered  
Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Discussions > Articles > First Looks... > Bodum Granos...  
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
showing page 2 of 3 first page | last page previous page | next page
Author Messages
mattyj
Senior Member
mattyj
Joined: 5 Apr 2004
Posts: 1,092
Location: Sydney
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Expobar Office Pulser
Grinder: Mazzer Mini
Vac Pot: Hario Mocha 3 Cup ... broken...
Posted Tue Jun 21, 2005, 6:26pm
Subject: Re: Bodum Granos Automatic Espresso Machine
 

My recommendation is to take the portafilter to a krups repair centre, or a small appliance shop that stock krups parts, and find a plain basket that fits. Use that instead of the pressurised basket, and it should be good!
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
TimMorris
Senior Member


Joined: 21 Jun 2005
Posts: 2
Location: London
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Granos
Grinder: Krups
Posted Tue Jun 21, 2005, 8:45pm
Subject: Re: Bodum Granos Automatic Espresso Machine
 

Matty,

Thanks for replying.

I know that the Sunbeam Aromatic that the Granos is alledgedly based on has a 53mm diameter, but I don't know whether that is an internal or external measurement. My filter measures 52.65mm (external diameter), 51.32 (internal diameter), 23.00 (external height measured at the rim).

Anyone with a Krups filter basket that matches those dimensions? The nearest major Krups service centre that stocks spares is 200 miles away, so if I can find out which part no I need I can order it.

Tim
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
mattyj
Senior Member
mattyj
Joined: 5 Apr 2004
Posts: 1,092
Location: Sydney
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Expobar Office Pulser
Grinder: Mazzer Mini
Vac Pot: Hario Mocha 3 Cup ... broken...
Posted Tue Jun 21, 2005, 9:40pm
Subject: Re: Bodum Granos Automatic Espresso Machine
 

just searched for an old post, where i mentioned the part ...

go to the krups website (www.krups.com.au) {This is the australian site, you might need to check if krups have a site for your country} to find his nearest service centre, and from there, order part #0907163. or it could be 0907/63 ... the sticker was hand written, so i can't be quite sure. The part is from the vivo and novo models (not sure what model numbers...), and is a plain, rounded double filter, no crema enhancing bit.

Hope that helps!
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
mlafe
Senior Member
mlafe
Joined: 17 Apr 2003
Posts: 9
Location: California
Expertise: I live coffee

Espresso: Bodum Granos - LOVE IT
Grinder: La Pavoni
Vac Pot: Bodum - LOVE IT
Drip: no way
Roaster: hot air
Posted Sat Aug 6, 2005, 8:20pm
Subject: Re: Bodum Granos Automatic Espresso Machine
 

I just wanted to put my 2 cents in on this machine.  I purchased this machine the same week that Bodum released it and have been using it ever since.
It's by far the most beautiful machine I've seen.  I was using a Saeco Classico.  I was always happy with the classico as it makes the best espresso shot ever.  The steam is a little weak and watery though.
When I got the Bodum I couldn't stop playing with it.  I loved that you can program it for exactly how long you like your shots. I also loved the fact that the used hot water was not put back into the water resivour for re-use.  I don't like the idea of using water that has already been heated for your next shot. The drip tray is fantistic, deep, heavy duty and even stylish.  The steam power is great but I can't seem to do a no-foam drink if I tried (although why would I ever want to do that!)  The thing that was strange about the steam knob is that you can't adjust it higher or lower, there is only one setting, but it's a really good setting.
I see from your review that your opinion is that  the machine doesn't heat up sufficiently to brew a shot when allowed to cool down or unless you run lots of water through it.  Well I too was not satisifed with the temperature, so I found a trick to heat it up quicker and hotter.  I always steam my milk prior to making my shot.  At that point, the machine is the perfect temperature and my shot comes out with a thick rich, golden crema.  If I don't do this, the crema is weak and light because the machine is not quite hot enough.

I've been using this for almost a year and am really happy with it.  Every machine has it's own personality and after you learn all the tricks to make your machine happy, then it's a beautiful thing!  And it looks so great on the counter too.
back to top
 View Profile Visit website Link to this post
bkcedar
Senior Member


Joined: 15 Oct 2005
Posts: 1
Location: Seattle
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Bodum Granos
Grinder: Solis
Vac Pot: Hitachi Gnome
Drip: N/A
Roaster: N/A
Posted Sat Oct 15, 2005, 9:57am
Subject: Re: Bodum Granos Automatic Espresso Machine
 

I purchased the Bodum Granos online with only the word of Coffeegeek and a little from the seller. I was a little surprised at the actual size of the machine. It is bigger than I imagined. It's looks remind me a little of a game we had when I was growing up called Cootie(sp?).

I love this espresso maker. It is absolutely beautiful in my kitchen. It has style galore. I love the heating chamber (which not being an espresso drinker, I use for my showpiece tamper and my vacuum espresso shot glasses) and I love the water reservoir so clear and easy to view. I love how easy it is to fill with filtered water. And I really love how easy it is to keep clean. This has been a real issue in the past with some of my Italian machines.

I love everything about the design of this machine except one thing. The steam wand needs to be on a ball joint. Currently it has only one plane of movement and you cannnot aim it anywere but it's arc. I know it's lazy but I like to start the steaming process with the pitcher on the plate and dip the steam arm down to it for a while. I will pick it up when it is starting to get some action and I hear the milk is heating up. I have figured out ways around it but I hope the engineers at Bodum are reviewing this perilous oversight.

Functionally, It is absolutely the best machine I have ever had anything to do with in it's price range. I am sorry but I cannot justify spending more than $500 US for a coffee maker at home, especially when there are options like this one which, despite my earlier note on it's shortcomings, is the best milk steamer I have ever worked with on any machine for home or professional use. The frothing attachment seems to me to be some kind of bone thrown to Americans to help it sell. Fotunately it is easy to remove and the machine looks and operates much better without it.

This machine produces the most consistent crema and pulls rich espresso flavor from even commercial blends. It is a pleasure to operate at home. If it's in a transitional heating mode you can still push the button for a single shot or a double shot (programmed for perfection) and walk away. No baby sitting on this machine and the 19 bar pump really works hard. Definitely the supreme leader in it's price category.

I never use an espresso maker to make tea with the hot water setting since it is never quite hot enough and produces a tainted flavor.  This machine is no exception. It is not a substitute for a teapot on the stove except uner extreme circumstances. It is handy to run hot water through the steaming wand but only as a cleaning tool. This does not color my sense of the machine because I don't use it for this purpose. That being said, my wife loves the consistent smooth rich steamed milk she can get from this machine for her Tazo Chai Tea Lattes. She has never been able to produce a great smooth froth from our earlier (semi-commercial) espresso machines. With our Budum she gets what she wants every time.

So there is my two cents. I recommend this machine without reservation for beauty and functionality in a semi-automatic. If you need gauges and swiches and total control every moment--look elsewhere. If you want to have consistent brews and great steaming look no further.
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
emgrubo
Senior Member


Joined: 25 Nov 2005
Posts: 1
Location: Geneva, Switzerland
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Bodum Granos
Posted Fri Nov 25, 2005, 5:23am
Subject: Re: Bodum Granos Automatic Espresso Machine
 

Hi,

I bought the Bodum Granos after your review, and to be honest, because of its design. I had to exchange the first machine after 3 days, because the espresso was very light (like American coffee) with any kind of coffee (Lavazza, 2-3 brands of Arabica...). The second one is a little bit stronger, but I am not convinced compared to other machines I had or professional coffee makers. Is your espresso also not very strong?

The second and I ask it because nobody in the reviews is talking about it, but the machine (the first one and the second one) are VERY noisy. I understand that this is not a plastic machine, so there can be a difference, but it is still very loud (metallic noise), surprising my friends not only me... I am wondering if I am doing something wrong (already did read the user guide several times and no clue). Am I unlucky and I had 2 bad machines in a bad serie?

Thanks !


Greg
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
darrylr
Senior Member


Joined: 3 Apr 2005
Posts: 253
Location: Washington
Expertise: I live coffee

Posted Mon Nov 28, 2005, 11:56pm
Subject: Re: Bodum Granos Automatic Espresso Machine
 

Greg, I've used a Granos and yes it is noisy, but not noiser than other machines I've used that are in the same class.   The Granos has a vibe pump like other machines of this ilk, and vibe pumps are quite noisy and also, as the name suggests, produce a lot of vibration of the machine.  It's normal.  

Regarding your espresso being too weak, it's not likely a machine problem given that two machines have been the same for you.  Here are
more likley possibilities (any alone or several in combination):

  1. Machine isn't warm enough.  Be sure to let it warm up a good long time, and with the portafilter locked in place.  I'd suggest 20-30 minutes to give it a warmup for best results.  Beware the auto-standby timer that turns off the heating element at 30 minutes.  Until you've pulled your last shot from the machine, periodically keep it awake by doing two presses of the hot water button on the front panel.  No water will dispense (you need to twist the black knob for that) but pressing the button will keep the machine awake.

  2. To help get the brew temp up to snuff, I'd suggest optionally using the manual brew button to drop a couple ounces of water through the portafilter first, then quickly load it up with coffee and pull your shot.  Running some water first helps to pre-warm the brew head.  

  3. Be sure you're using enough coffee in the portafilter.  Don't put in less than the recommended amount.

  4. Be sure you're not running too much liquid for the amount of coffee.  A single shot is only an ounce.  If you're using the double shot filter basket, I wouldn't go over 1.5 oz.  Your best bet is to skip the automated dosing buttons and use the manual dose button.  Let it pour only so long as the stream of espresso is coming out a nice brown color.  As soon as it starts to get light, what's called "blonding", stop.

  5. If you're using espresso pods instead of ground coffee, absolutely don't go over 1 ounce of liquid.  Again, controlling the pour manually to avoid blonding is the best bet.

If you're not using pods, I really recommend that you buy high quality beans and grind them fresh, just before brewing your shots.  While stale beans or preground coffee won't cause a weak brew per se, you will find that the brew will have less body (and certainly less flavor) and this could contribute to a perception of less strength.

Overall I think the Granos is a really nice, high quality machine, especially for one at that price point and you'll be able to get good shots from it once you master the technique.  This would be true for any espresso machine that isn't a superauto machine.  The tips I've given would apply to just about any consumer machine, not just the Granos.

Darryl
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
picha69
Senior Member
picha69
Joined: 18 Dec 2005
Posts: 2
Location: Boston MA
Expertise: I live coffee

Posted Sun Dec 18, 2005, 5:21pm
Subject: Re: Bodum Granos Automatic Espresso Machine
 

I just want to thank to all of you, who have taken up the time to review this machine.

I spent the last three weeks researching for a more elaborate espresso maker. I am a "proud" owner of Mr.Coffee espresso (looks exactly like the Breville ESP8XL Cafe Roma Espresso Maker but not as shiny and of course not made of stainless steel. The espresso is crappy no matter what I try. The "longest" time of brewing is not more than 15 sec at most.... you do the math.

I think that after this extensive and exhaustive research, I am ready to write reviews, if not for the fact that I know exactly what most of the reviews miss when assessing a machine. At this time I cannot help with any sort of review of the Bodum Granos (it is most likely somewhere sitting in a FedEx warehouse waiting to be delivered soon to me), but I can give you a brief overview of the process of my research (so that you do not repeat this terrible experience), and to elucidate the detailed dynamics of my decision-making, culminating with the purchase of the Bodum Granos for not more than $319.00 plus 5% sales tax.

First, I wanted a good espresso machine. Not like my crappy Mr. Coffee, more suitable to be called Mr.Coloder-Hot-Water-Coffee-Destroyer. Then, I wanted it to be <b>semi-automatic</b>, or just automatic, but in no way sueprautomatic. I can't stand the idea that I can't see what is happening behind the walls of these office-like-printer-scanner-copier-full-of-digital-s*** boxes. My wife, on the hand, is in love with the superautomatics. Thanks God, they are so much more expensive, when you need to get a "good" one! So, we settled for a price range of not more than $500, preferably less.

After days and days on the Internet (and please note, I am a busy man), my choice was narrowed down to a handful of machines, most of them available for comparison on bizrate, epinions and pricegrabber (dot com for all). The choice was the following:

Rancilio Sylvia; Gaggia Classic; Bodum Granos; La Pavoni Napolitana PA-1200; Solis SL-70 and SL-90; Starbucks Barista and La Pavoni Cellini (a bit over $500). My favorite was the Napolitana  but I dropped it out after I was unable to find not even one comprehensive review. I still regret about it.

The Gaggia Classic was not selected based on an elaborate assessment, comprising subjective social construction of things that I did not like to hear. In other words, the reviews I read, although very praising of the machine, stroke some cords of doubts that would have chased me forever, if I were to buy this machine. The most important being: (a) could rust; (b) small boiler; (c) very delicate in terms of operation.

La Pavoni, as I already said, in both cases -- Napolitana and Cellini -- was brushed aside due to lack of any reliable information about it.

The Solis SL-90 was forgotten after a few not so good reviews of its automatic features, especially the fact that after the first shot, the temperature drops significantly, and the overly exposed "crema" feature, derived from the pressurized portafilter and spring baskets (but, yet again, what do I know about those things coming from the experience of my Mr.Coffee, who seems to me more and more like an euphemistic nickname of an impotent nerd :) ).

Starbucks Barista sucks, if not only for the fact that every "starbucks wanna-be" has it. Also, a friend of mine has one, and I am not impressed by it. The crema is so "forced" to be, that it stays in the cup long after the coffee is gone. The shot per se is sour and the second one is detectably weaker... Should I continue? Another friend of mine has the old version of the Barista, which is automatic and is much nicer. Unfortunately, I hear, it has been pulled out of the market, due to incessant defects and malfunctioning (my friend had to fix it twice so far). Bottom line, no Starbucks maker!!!

So, to the final line! Last night I managed to narrow the choices down to the final two - Sylvia and Granos. My wife is not trilled at all by the futuristic view of the Granos - too "unorthodox" for her taste... I am ambivalent about it. Looks fashionable, that is true, but the Napolitana is my favorite among the initial choices. So, what made me chose Bodum Granos?

I will be frank - I got scared by Sylvia. Oh, she scares me, so much! I am terrified, petrified, stupefied, horrified... What if I spend $500, and it turns out that it is not the impotency of my Mr.Coffee that has been wrong, but my own intellectual incapability to learn how to make my espresso? Plus, the look is not so great, let's face it! Sylvia looks like a retro (80s), plain and simple espresso maker. I don't care, if my friends ask me how could I spend so much money for such "an ordinary" machine. They said the same about my Saab, but the car is incredible. What I care is that every time I look at Sylvia, I will doubt her. It is like a marriage - if your wife does not take proper care of herself and her outlook, you will find yourself salivating after the "hot chicks" all the time, no matter how great, smart, compassionate, loving and caring she might be. <b>Plus, every "espresso-big-shot-authority-conn aiseur-stupidity-bashing-maniac" wanna-be out there probably has one already. Too bad it is just one that everybody seem to want these days. Where is the fun? I want an espresso machine that cries out "I am eccentric! I am funky! I am not your traditional espresso machine! Yet,  I am very very capable! So, just dare to underestimate me!

In a nutshell, I may come to regret the Bodum choice (and I can't really go out and buy another machine, due to some budgetary restrictions imposed by the IMF, the World Bank, and the roll-back taxes), so I hope (and cross fingers) that I made the right choice. For one thing I am sure, there will always be another machine out there, that will be better, nicer, etc. bla-bla. The only important thing is for this one, that is due to come soon, to work properly.

That was my lepta for now, I will come back with some "first impressions" later on Happy holidays to everybody!

Oh, and please forgive my spelling and style, just an ESL problem I still struggle with :(
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
darrylr
Senior Member


Joined: 3 Apr 2005
Posts: 253
Location: Washington
Expertise: I live coffee

Posted Mon Dec 19, 2005, 11:50pm
Subject: Re: Bodum Granos Automatic Espresso Machine
 

Hi Lubo, it was interesting to hear your thought process on your decision.  I'll look forward to hearing your comments.  I've seen the Granos and I think it is a beautiful machine and seems very well built.  It is all metal, and a beautifully polished metal at that--certainly unique at this price point in that regard, and at $319 you got quite a good deal.

I've only sampled the espresso on the Granos using ESE pods and since I've only ever tried pods on one other machine it's hard for me to say how well the Granos stacks up to other machines.  I've never used any of the other ones you researched.  The guy who runs this site, Mark Prince, has done first-look review of the Granos, which I imagine you've seen.  He gave it a good rating based on the first look and promised an eventual follow up where he'd be comparing it to the Solis.  Hopefully he'll chime in with any new thoughts he has on the machine.

Good luck with the machine and let us know how you like it.

Darryl
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
Lasse
Senior Member


Joined: 2 Apr 2006
Posts: 1
Location: Denmark
Expertise: I love coffee

Espresso: Bodum Granos
Grinder: none
Vac Pot: Bodum Santos
Posted Fri Apr 7, 2006, 10:08am
Subject: Re: Bodum Granos Automatic Espresso Machine
 

"Most of the people who will eventually read this first look and subsequent Detailed Review of the Bodum Granos will find the review via a Google search after spotting the machine at a upscale kitchen store, and they just want to know more about the machine."  
Oh yes this is the correct description of what happened.

This a side - I am a member now and I actually bought the Granos based on the reviews of Mark and the posts on the topic. I agree with the majority, it is a very likable machine. I am a student and therefore only have limited amounts of money to spend on machines like this - you know how crazy the price range is!
I have had the machine a week now -so it is all very new! I to had problems with the "bottle connecting device" it does not take in air - which at some point will become a problem :-). I am considering taking it (the bottlething) to the main Bodum store to hear what they have to say - it seems to be a generel problem - but you can just pour the water into the water container anyway.
I have to ask -when is the big final review comming?? It seems a high number of testing months have passed - and I am very excited to hear the final verdict on Granos. Thank you for a great homepage that became the deciding factor in my purchase.
The kindest regards Lasse

Lasse: Billede008.jpg
(Click for larger image)
back to top
 View Profile Link to this post
showing page 2 of 3 first page | last page previous page | next page
view previous topic | view next topic | view all topics
Discussions > Articles > First Looks... > Bodum Granos...  
New Topics updated topics   New Posts new posts   Unanswered Posts new unanswered     Search Discussion Board search   Discussion Board FAQ faq   Signup sign up  
Not Logged in: Log In to Postlog in
Discussions Quick Jump:
Symbols: New Posts= New Posts since your last visit      No New Posts= No New Posts since last visit     Go to most recent post= Newest post
Forum Rules:
No profanity, illegal acts or personal attacks will be tolerated in these discussion boards.
No commercial posting of any nature will be tolerated; only private sales by private individuals, in the "Buy and Sell" forum.
No SEO style postings will be tolerated. SEO related posts will result in immediate ban from CoffeeGeek.
No cross posting allowed - do not post your topic to more than one forum, nor repost a topic to the same forum.
Who Can Read The Forum? Anyone can read posts in these discussion boards.
Who Can Post New Topics? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post new topics.
Who Can Post Replies? Any registered CoffeeGeek member can post replies.
Can Photos be posted? Anyone can post photos in their new topics or replies.
Who can change or delete posts? Any CoffeeGeek member can edit their own posts. Only moderators can delete posts.
Probationary Period: If you are a new signup for CoffeeGeek, you cannot promote, endorse, criticise or otherwise post an unsolicited endorsement for any company, product or service in your first five postings.
Rancilio Silvia - How to
Step by step guide for easy brewing and steaming with the Rancilio Silvia
www.seattlecoffeegear.com
Home | Opinions | Consumer Reviews | Guides & How Tos | CoffeeGeek Reviews | Resources | Forums | Contact Us
CoffeeGeek.com, CoffeeGeek, and Coffee Geek, along with all associated content & images are copyright ©2000-2014 by Mark Prince, all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Content, code, and images may not be reused without permission. Usage of this website signifies agreement with our Terms and Conditions. (0.243341207504)
Privacy Policy | Copyright Info | Terms and Conditions | CoffeeGeek Advertisers | RSS | Find us on Google+